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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does it mean anything if the shot placements are strung in a horizontal line vs a vertical grouping or regular round grouping on the target? Could it mean that the velocity and load is fairly uniform, but I was not "holding" well?
 

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It depends. Are we talking pistol or rifle? Benched or offhand? What distance, what conditions, what basic ballistic performance of the load?

Horizontal stringing in a benched rifle is often a result of failing to appreciate just how much a gusty wind can affect the flight of a bullet. Too, bad bench technique can cause all kinds of problems at the target.

For ofhand pistols, there are all sorts of holding errors that can push bullet impacts left or right (though usually not both).

We need a little more information before a good answer can be found. For example, has this particular combo shot well for you in the past and has suddenly gone sour? Gradually? Or is this a new combo that you haven't yet fully tested?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I am testing this load. The wind was blowing pretty good - 10-15mph $ gusty. This was at 100yds. shooting off a concrete bench with a sandbag. It just looked kind of odd that they were within 1/2" of a drawn horizontal line but spread out about 6 inches in total right to left. It could have easily been me. I am thinking about moving down to 50 yds so I can see the bullseye better. The only thing I changed on the load was neck sizing vs full length sizing. I am going to start to change the seating depths and see if that will tighten them back up.
 

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A gusty wind, unless you're paying a great deal of attention, can easily cause the horizontal stringing you're describing. If I were you, I wouldn't bother moving in to 50 yards. Just try again on a calm day and I'm betting you'll be quite happy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I forgot to mention this fact. Could the fact that I did not clean the cases, especially in the neck area cause the bullet to seat to one side and give irregular flight? I am guessing now that with the same powder charge they have close to the same veloclity and that is why they were so close on a vertical plane. Anyone care to try this one? Should I go buy a tumbler?

Facts: benchrest shooting, scope, 100yds, same load previously shot 1.5", warmer by 30 degrees.
 

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Possum said:
I forgot to mention this fact. Could the fact that I did not clean the cases, especially in the neck area cause the bullet to seat to one side and give irregular flight? I am guessing now that with the same powder charge they have close to the same veloclity and that is why they were so close on a vertical plane. Anyone care to try this one? Should I go buy a tumbler?

Facts: benchrest shooting, scope, 100yds, same load previously shot 1.5", warmer by 30 degrees.
Possum,
Sorry for not responding but I've been left hangin' out there on the line too many times also! I've noticed that trigger snap/pull can cause horizontal stringing. I own a tumbler but to be honest, they don't clean inside the case for schmidt! What you need to do if you are concerned is to use a liquid cleaning/brightning bath such as "Iosso Case Cleaning Kit" $14.99 in Cabela's catalog. All a tumbler will do is save you some time that you would put into cleaning with steelwool and Brasso externally. Inside the case has to be done with brush. Last point and I'll go away. Did you seat the bullets for standard published C.O.L. case over-all length, or did you try to measure the throat length of your gun and set the bullet out to that length (less .005-.020")? As you know, the closer the bullet sits to the rifling, the more consistant the results.

Jim
 
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