Graybeard Outdoors banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
332 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If so, can someone please give it to me :(. Missed a really nice buck with the bow this afternoon. 12 yards broadside. I guess I just used the wrong pin. Or maybe I just didn't use any pins. Not really sure what happened, but the arrow flew right over him. I watched it fly for a while and it even seemed like it flew in slow motion so I could agonize over the shot. Typical for me - choked at the moment of truth. Have always gottne buck fever really bad, even on does. Although I guess if it ever stops I'll quit hunting.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,927 Posts
Short answer NO. But what helped me is as soon as I know its a shooter is stop looking at the horns. Concentrate on that spot right behind his shoulder. The spot where I want my bullet or arrow to end up. That really smoothed out my Buck fever. Didnt cure it but gave me something to concentrate on .
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,670 Posts
I think you either get it or you don't. i'm one of those who doesn't get buck fever. It's a very matter of fact thing with me. I don't trophy either so maybe thats one of the differences. it's nice to get a good buck once in a while but it's not important to me. The only reason I know what buck fever is like is because I turkey hunt. But like what was said i have to just concentrate on my shot. Focusing like that seems to help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,354 Posts
Here is the deal. You care too much. Stop caring and the buck fever goes away. Don't get it when you see the deer out the car window do you?

Now here is the tricky part. If you didn't care, you would not be hunting now would you? I suggest you shoot the next five deer that walk by, fawn, does, bucks whatever. Alternately try to shoot every deer that walks past. By that I mean get set up for the shot, let the adrennalin flow, try for the shakes, commit to the shot, draw the bow, pick a single hair, whisper bang then let the bow down.

When you do decide to shoot a deer, don't look at it too much. keep it in your peripheral vision but don't focus on it. Stay still of course but look for other deer, try to tell yourself the deer is nice but you would really like to find a bit bigger one right now, matter of fact it is too dang small. Convince yourself you are going to let it pass. Heck let it pass, maybe, or quickly change your mind, draw pick a hair and release.

Convince yourself you don't care.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
"I guess I just used the wrong pin."

Practice more. I personally feel buck fever is usually a case of someone realizing at the moment of truth that they may not
be up to the task at hand and they start doubting their skill and second guessing their actions. With a bow that means practicing enough that you can judge the yardage out to 40yds. At 12 yds you should of known immediately what pin to use and If you were unsure it probably made you nervous as **** and it gets called buck fever. With a rifle it seems to happen with the guys who never go to the range or sight in their rifles. They finally get a buck in their sights and realize that they have no idea if the bullet will actually end up where they are aiming and finally understand what "bore sighted only" really means or realize that even at 50 yds, iron sights which you never practiced with seem awfully big and the buck seems awfully small. Other than first timers who aim at the whole animal instead of picking a spot, I never see too many regular range visitors, rifle or bow, suffer from buck fever, its always the once a year shooters. When you really think about how large of a target a deers vitals are and the large margin for error that exists its almost unreal the number of misses that happen every year. In my area, if you can shoot an 6 inch group at 50 yds you have a dead deer, yet every year someone cleanly misses. Don't mean to offend and I understand why it happens. Overall it takes a minimum of half a day just to sight in a rifle, let alone practice for any reasonable length of time when you include drive time to the range. Addin traffic and its a full day . Consider the cost, 25 bucks for 1 hr range time and 25 bucks for twenty cartridges, another 20 for gas and tolls and its amazing if anyone other than a true gun lover or bow hunter in the NYC metro area ever gets to a range. (bow hunters have it a little easier as there are closer ranges but its still a hassle.) Good luck to all. Just an opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
332 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I should clarify. I am in my forties and have shot somewhere between 20 and 30 deer, and several with the bow. However I get it often enough for it to be a real pain in the @$#. Also, I get it with does, turkeys and most anything else. I'm not a trophy hunter so it's not the rack that does it. I practice alot, but when it comes to the moment of truth, my brain often goes to mush.

But I think it comes down to what Empty Quiver said - try not to care so much, or at least convince myself I don't. I like that gameplan. Heding out right now. Will remember that - hopefully. My wife had another good one for me, which I will try to remember today. Her's was "Don't be stupid"!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,670 Posts
"Don't be stupid"!
leatherstockings tell your wife thanks! I hope I can remember that when spring turkey season rolls around.I have blown more turkey hunts because of my own stupidity than any other reason. calling again after I see them coming. Not sitting down the first time I here them gobble when I run and gun. second guessing my set up. not being patient enough! It also just occured to me that one reason I don't get buck fever is because I take my revenge for all the turkey hunts deer have blown for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,128 Posts
the best cure is exeperience the more I hve taken the fever hs went away. I look see if it is what I want and get ready to do the shot. This has come to me with yers of experience watching deer, shooting deer and basically got over the fever.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
332 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well, I had another opportunity today. This time a four pointer at ~20-25 yds. I actually stayed fairly calm, kept my composure, took my time, used a pin (and definitely the right pin) ....... and I blew the shot anyway. Deer was quartering away and I hit it in the rump. Trailed it ~600 yards. Will be out looking for it some more in the morning. I think I'll take up golf...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,354 Posts
Feel terrible for you. Ham only, it may just survive. Good luck, on the trail. Keep working and don't let one bad hit keep you out of the woods.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,618 Posts
The only way I got rid of it was by seeing more deer.
Sounds like you are on your way. You are seeing deer and they are comming back.
The only other thing I can think of is practicing from the same angle your stand is in, in the off season.
(one silly question. Are the broad heads you are using the same weight as the feild tips you practice with?)
Good luck
third shot is the charm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
723 Posts
I don't know if you are able to spend a lot of time in the woods or not, but I am an old fart, retired for many years. Go out year around and watch all game. Get as close as you can with out spooking it. Take your camera.
For turkeys, I go at dusk and watch them fly up into the trees. They are quite noisy about it. Next morning , I am right there waiting for them to fly down. If I don't move, they will walk right past me.
Whether I intend to shoot or not, for a deer, I pick my spot and hold on the heart and go "bang", quietly.
I find it rewarding and don't get buck fever any more. Hope this helps.


The Hermit
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
691 Posts
Not from back East,but live in Kansas.If I ever get over the"fever",I'll quit hunting and take up knitting.I've hunted,like most of you,for 35-40 years and have taken many big bucks,small bucks and too many does to count.Still get the same ole feeling in my gut and the shakes.I read once if I could breath life back in them,I would so I could do it all over again the next day.Enjoy the feeling and the mistakes it can make you have.Teach your kids or someone's kids to hunt and enjoy the out doors.So they can feel the"fever".Slow
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
332 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hey Slow,

Good point. I guess that fever feeling is something I should embrace. And I have shot quite a few deer so it is not like it always gets in the way. And I am teaching my boys the same love of the outdoors I have, so I've got that covered. Unfortunately they have my genes though, so they will probably get the fever real bad too!

PS - Woodduck - no such thing as a silly question, but yes, broadheads and field tips are both 100g
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,670 Posts
My son shot his first buck on 10/30/09 I asked him him if he got buck fever? He said what is that? I said a kind of nervous feeling in your stomach and second guessing your shot placement and he said yes. The deer was quartering to him and he shot it just in front of the left shoulder and dropped the deer in it's tracks. I guess he overcame it. He did good I am proud of him.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,574 Posts
Well if you ever quit getting buck fever, quit hunting. If the sight of a big buck does not cause your pulse to quicken and blood pressure to rise, it is no fun no more.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,526 Posts
billy - I sure have to agree with you there. I have hunted many large animals before and some have been real trophys, although that is not the reason I was hunting them.

And man, you sure are right - the pulse quickens, senses come on high alert, movements become stealthy (or so I'd like to think), but when I bring the rifle or pistol up to steady the sights and take aim it all comes together.

A high school classmate of mine wrote a book on Hunting Tips and Techniques (or something like that) and I'm going to get a copy for one of my younger hunting friends who prefers to bow hunt, but regularly misses with anything he picks up, bow or muzzleloader. I'm hoping it may help him to finally connect.

Go figure, this fella was my friend all through elementary and high school; we graduate, live in the same neck of the woods but don't see each other for 45 years and then encounter each other twice in the past 3 months. He mentioned he was going bow hunting with his two sons and I mentioned I was hunting Turkey with a pistol. He mentioned his book and I checked it out on Amazon and have ordered a copy.

There's nothing wrong with 'gettin' the fever', as long as you put it to work for you. jmtcw.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
332 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
but when I bring the rifle or pistol up to steady the sights and take aim it all comes together.
That's good Mikey. But that is precisely my problem. Like I said earlier, I've been hunting many years (~30 now I guess) and have shot my share of deer, turkeys, etc and yet still often enough it doesn't come together at that moment of truth - it falls apart! I need to figure out how to "put the fever to work for me". Although if I did that I wouldn't consider it buck fever :-\
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,130 Posts
Relax and think, i can see him,he dont see me if he knew i was here he wouldnt be. Even in the thickest woods you have more time than you think. Once you decidw to take a buck focus on the body not the head.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,431 Posts
it seems like i lost the buck fever when i decided to not take every deer that came in range. only the ones that presented a perfect shot.i still get a touch of it on a big buck but combat it by once i decide to take a animal i concentrate on the exact spot i want to bullet or arrow to go.for some reason instinct seems to take over, ive shot deer where i never heard the shot or remembered exactly where i aimed.i used to shoot a 18 inch barrel model 7 243 that would ring your ears and make yu deaf for 2 days but when fired at a deer i never heard the shot.thats kinda weird.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top