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Discussion Starter #1
FYI: It appears that Ithaca finally went belly up. They moved from Ithaca, NY to Kings Ferry, NY about 18 years ago and recently moved to Auburn, NY. All of their phones at both locations are disconnected, their Web site closed down and no one has been able to reach anyone at Ithaca. They claimed to be re-organizing, but this is no way to keep a customer base if you are in fact trying to reorganize. It is sad to think they went away and there will be no more Ithaca guns.
 

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Seems like Ithaca goes belly up once every ten or twenty years. This is nothing new for most American gun companies.
 

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I too have toured the Ithaca Gun Plant in Kings Fairy some years ago. I own a 12 gauge model 37 made in the late 60's and love it.... a Deerslayer model w/ 20" smoothbore barrel. To a left-hander it's a god send for being a down ejector. Having been a retired metallographer, I was interested in their construction techniques and I believe as others have said before that milling a receiver out of a 6 pound block of steel is just too expensive and not cost effective in today's market. They can't compete in a world market.

The company was reorganized some years ago by a handfull of ex-employees and scraped by with old equipment and out-dated techniques and facilities! I hope and pray that if they can hold it together long enough to reorganize, they would consider out sourcing, going to a precision cast receiver that will save more time and money. Having retired from a foundry facility that have made cast parts in the past for Remington (at the time for model 1911 auto sidearms). Today that foundry is making very large turbine blades for land-based generators with amazingly "tight" controls. I'm sure Ithaca could still produce an excellent product and maintain their unique design with precision cast receivers.
Jim
 

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Ramrod: Ithaca was taken over by employees about 17 or 18 years ago and did pretty good for quite a while.
 

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SavageT. I know what you are saying. On my tour I was surprised at the age of their machines, most older than me.There are a LOT of steps in simply milling,drilling and profiling that 6 pound block into a receiver and especially on non computerized equipment. I beleive they told me their barrels were made for them in France, so they outsourced some things I guess. I too think they should have considered cast receivers, Ruger sure has made it obvious that it works.. I also think that Ruger cast a lot of stuff for other companies,not just for their needs. I am sure there are other companies that could provide this service and cut down on all tha machine work that goes into the gun. I personally could get by without the roll "engraving" they put on the receiver. It looks ok at best and is just another step in the process. Did they show you the twin action arm model 37 they were playing with. I guess people wanted them to have 2 arms like the Rem 870. Ithaca's opinion was they could do it easy enough but it didn't give them anything they weren't getting with the one arm. Except a forearm that was more stable. Anyhow, I hope they in fact reorganize, but I have the feeling we may have bought our last New Ithaca..
 

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What would a new Ithaca 16 gauge shotgun be selling for at a dealer? I tried looking at the website and it is down. I thought they had a deluxe version of the model 37

Thanks,
 
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