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Discussion Starter #1
Nothing you guys haven't seen from me before.
Built for a 48" barrel. Shipping to Philadelphia.
Don't have the barrel in my possession.

Zulu























 

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Very, very, nice! I love a nice naval carriage. I have made two myself, but they pale in comparison to that one.
 

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Very, very nice, Michael. I think a large portion of what catches our attention on your carriages is the finish and we all know how important a well-sanded piece of wood is to obtain those excellent results. Could you, once and for all tell us precisely how you sand both Fir and Oak wood with the differences noted? Mike and I stand back and say, WOW every time we are standing in front of your work in Cypress! Thank you. Is there any time for hand sanding in your method??

Tracy & Mike
 

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T & M,
That's funny! I've never really been quite satisfied with my finishes.
My lovely assistant does all the finish work but I do all the sanding. I generally start with a palm sander and 80 grit paper. Then to 150 grit, then to 220 grit. When you think you are done sanding, do it again. With the fir that I use for my concrete 1841 six pounder, I just use the 80 grit. All that wood is very rough cut and I don't want it smooth. I sand it just enough to get the hair off of it.
The rough cut wood gives the carriage the look I am trying to achieve.
Zulu



 

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T & M,
That's funny! I've never really been quite satisfied with my finishes.
My lovely assistant does all the finish work but I do all the sanding. I generally start with a palm sander and 80 grit paper. Then to 150 grit, then to 220 grit. When you think you are done sanding, do it again. With the fir that I use for my concrete 1841 six pounder, I just use the 80 grit. All that wood is very rough cut and I don't want it smooth. I sand it just enough to get the hair off of it.
The rough cut wood gives the carriage the look I am trying to achieve.
Zulu



Thanks Michael, we sure appreciate you sharing important information like that. I have decided to make our stand for this heavy British Seacoast Gun from White Oak because I want it to be sturdy as well as look nice. I will have quite a bit of hardwood to finish and the thought of sanding all those surfaces with a wood or rubber sanding block makes my hand hurt. I think that I will invest in a palm sander. My planer and jointer, with the blades recently sharpened with diamond wheels, finish White Oak so smooth that I believe that I can skip the 80 grit and go with 100, 150, and then 220.

Best regards,

Tracy
 
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