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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Fist some background. Here in North Dakota turkey hunting is a fairly recent (12-15 years?) event and populations are nowhere near that of some states and maybe 1/4 of the state has huntable populations. We have to draw for a tag which on average you get once every 3 or 4 years so none of us natives have a lot of turkey hunting experience. The Unit I am currently hunting issued 150 permits for an area of roughly 7000 square miles of mostly flat farmland. needles to say you don't have a lot of competition at hunting spots. The week prior to the opener (which I missed) the birds were bunched up and not responsive to calling. Many people filled on the opener and reports are the birds would come a running without much effort. Weekend two take my son out. birds are still responsive but most are with 2-3 hens but still come in well. Weekend 3 birds are starting to get quiet really have to work to get a response and most birds are alone or with 1 hen. Given I have seen no other hunters in the area am I correct in assuming that most of the birds are bred and the breeding is tapering off?? One thing I did find out is it pays to have more than one call . I was starting with a pushbutton call and switching to the box call with which I could get more volume and definately got more responses. I'm also hunting with a pistol and will not shoot at strutting birds any more. Hard to tell where the body is with all those feathers. Any advice from anyone will be appreciated.
 

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:D You still got good hunting yet. When the hens start to nest the toms will wander around looking for a hen.They are still in the mood. Watch and see where the turkeys want to travel after they fly down so you can position yourself where they want to go.Locate them in the evening so you can be in position well before light in the morning. A coyote howl or owl or crow or a gobble can get them to sound off. In the morning they should gobble on the roost and hopefully a little calling will get them to fly down to you. It might help to have a decoy. Toms respond to hens and also to other toms and jakes they think are competing for their hens. I hope this helps.I'm in Wisconsin and my season doesn't start tilll May 7.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
One of the biggest obstacles I have is that I have permission to hunt a piece of property and it seems the birds spent most of their time and probably roost on the adjacent posted property. I'm confident that the owner will allow me to hunt there as he did once before but just have not been able to connect up with him yet. In the mean time I'm forced to try to call the birds off the posted stuff which is posing quite a challenge. Pulled a bird this morning but couldn't take the shot because he was on a small rise with farm building a couple hundred yards behind him behind him (remember I'm using a pistol) then he got in the woods behind me and literally ran in circles till I lost track of him. He seemed more responsive to the gobbles of more toms across the road than my hen call. As much as I would like to locate the birds roosting the night before my hunting area is about 45 minutes from home and most nights it is just impossible to do. I do have some located on the edge of town that I am able to "put to sleep" but they are hanging near the golf course so I have to be carefull how I set up and have had problems getting a safe shooting angle. I might switch to the bow for these birds.This is really begining to get in my blood.
 
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