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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thinking about getting into rifle/pistol reloading, but right now don't want to go big bucks. Anybody using a Lee hand loader (not the Press)? I have loaded many 100's of shotgun shells using an old Lee hand loader, and wonder if a Lee loader would work as well with .30-30 rounds. $20 plus the cost of components seems like a bargain to me right now.

thanks

alan
 

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I started with one, but decided I wanted to load for a lot more than just one or two chamberings and went with a press, but they work fine and load decent, accurate ammo without spending a lot of money on equipment, it's a great way to get your feet wet without a big investment in time and money. There are a lot of handloaders that use them as their only reloading tool and have for many years. ;)

Tim

http://www.beartoothbullets.com/tech_notes/archive_tech_notes.htm/51
 

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Ive Had pretty good results loading with them. I dont crimp with it. I got a scale, to try some different loads got some loaded up now just gotta find time to shoot. Jay
 

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I started out loading for my 6.5x55 Swede with a Lee Hand Loader. I did not use the supplied dipper but used a scale to work up a load. The ammo I now load in my press is the same load and is neither more nor less accurate than when I used the hand loader. Just faster. I say go for it.
 

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I don't know how many thousands of 6mm rounds i hammered together with one of those, but it had to be at least 3. Then I got one for 30-30 and another for 8mmx57. THEN I got an RCBS press.
 

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If it is all you can afford right now, then go for it. If you can dig up a little more then get one of Lee's reloading kits. I think those go for around $70. But either way, at least you get into reloading and have the satisfaction of rolling your own ammo. And be sure to get a loading manual as well.
 

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I've got most of the reloading whistles and bells that there is but this year I will be doing some of my deer hunting with a .300 Savage with a vintage weaver scope on it. To keep things in perspective, I'll be loading my hunting ammo with a Lee Loader. (I'll throw my powder charges with a scale tho)
 

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I started with one in 12 ga shotgun and probably loaded many thousand shell with it. When I decided to get into reloading for center-fire rifles and pistols and not wanting to spend a lot I went for this loader in I think .44 mag. It loads shells quite well and other then being slow I found only two things wrong with it. It does not full case size and this should not be a problem if you are reloading factory bullets you have shot only in your gun. If you are shooting two guns of the same caliber this could cause problems. At the time I was using it I had both a .44 Handi and a Ruger Deerfield.I soon found out that the bullets fired in the Handi, which had a larger chamber, could not then be resized in the classic loader and then fired in the Deerfield. The other problem with the Classic is that you will have an occasional primer go off while you are seating it with a hammer. This isn't so bad with small rifle/pistol primers but will sure get your attention with large ones. It is a harmless occurrence as long as you have good nerves. I still have 4 or 5 of the sets collecting dust on a shelf in my reloading room. Eventually I went to a single stage press and have not used them for years. They are a good way to get into reloading and see if it is for you. I still load shotgun shells with mine.

RJ
 

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It was at least 20 years ago when my Brother in law was showing me how he loaded rounds for his .30-30 using the Lee hand loader.
When it came time to seat the primer, both of his kids who happened to be nearby put their fingers in their ears ;D ;D
I guess that this is not a common problem but does happen now & again.

Now that you have your Lee hand loader and are thinking about purchasing a scale, I would also get the Lee Autoprime tool.
1. You do not have to touch the primers which will reduce contaminating them with finger oil & such.
2. You can feel when the primer just does touch the bottom of the pocket which may make for more consistent ignition and enhance accuracy.

You will eventually need this stuff anyway and it will be money well spent.
 

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I 2nd the Lee Autoprime tool,its what I use for all my priming.Also a scale so you can work up loads safely.The Lee Loader is a great way to start and makes very good reloads.I have one for every caliber I own,and use them when I just want to neck size.Works for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ordered a hand loader, along with their improved powder measure kit, manual, couple of different bullets and brass.
We'll see how it goes.

Thanks for the info ya'll.

alan
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Got my stuff yesterday. Can't believe how fast Midway delivered. Got 100 cases, three different weight bullets (110, 125 and 165 grain), and the loader and powder measure set. Headed out to to buy some H335 and primers.

Thanks ya'll.

alan
 

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tn_junk said:
Got my stuff yesterday. Can't believe how fast Midway delivered. Got 100 cases, three different weight bullets (110, 125 and 165 grain), and the loader and powder measure set. Headed out to to buy some H335 and primers.

Thanks ya'll.

alan
Excellent way to start reloading, I started that way myself in the early ‘60s.

A couple tips;

Get;
One of the larger MTM storage boxes, one with an internal tray, as it will hold all your reloading stuff.

A plastic headed mallet. These are available at most hardware/lumber yards.

Some 0000 steel wool to clean the outside of the neck. A small tuft wrapped around the neck and twisted does a quick job. May also be used with discretion to clean the outside of the cases.

A clean .30 cal bore brush on a small pistol rod to clean the inside of the necks. Push it straight in and slightly twist pulling it out. Usually one pass cleans the carbon and debris out pretty well.

A small screw driver to clean the primer pocket but the Lee primer pocket cleaner is inexpensive and works well.

A Lee chamfer tool for chamfering the inside of the case mouth and the outside if necessary. A small knife blade will do also for the inside.

The Lee hand priming tool is almost a must unless you want the be-jesus scared out of you when a primer pops tapping them in.

A Lee powder funnel, works much better than pouring through the sizer.

A tapered punch can be used to flair the case mouth if you are loaing cast bullets.

A loading block to hold the cases that you’ve put powder into.

Nice, or next to have;

Lee’s powder dippers.
A good powder scale.
A powder trickler.
At least one good reloading manual.
A dial caliper.

All the above will fit into the MTM box.

Most of the above will also be required when you advance to a single or progressive press.

Larry Gibson
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Appreciate the info Larry.
I have the Lee dipper set, and calipers and micrometers. I have loaded many 100's of shotgun shells with a Lee hand loader and am already immune to the primer pop. Going to load a few up tonight and maybe go to the range tomorrow and see how my .30-30 Handi Rifle likes hand loads.

alan
 

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Definately use the Lee Auto prime.
As for Lee Loader for 45 ACP; yes, I have and no I don't recommend it. Only Lee Loader I don't like.
 

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I loaded a few hundred 30-30 on the original Lee, also 30-06 and maybe a 1000+ 41 mags. But it was the 41 that convinced me to go to a press. Definately get a scale and the auto priime. Still use the Auto prime. I never set off a primer with the Lee kit but I think I got the Old prime tool pretty quickly to avoid the potential problem - and to do a better job.

Pay attention to case length in the 30-30 if you shoot them a lot. The Lee trimmer works pretty well too.
 
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