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Discussion Starter #1
I've never looked through a Weaver scope until this last Friday while at the range. I didn't get a chance the find out what the power range was but it was exceptionally clear and it had the very fine crosshairs in it. I really really liked the fine crosshairs and the target knobs for adjustment. It was on a guys very expensive target rifle that he asked me if I wanted to give a try to.

If anyone is considering buying a weaver I think it'd be a fine scope.

Now it's got me thinking about putting something similar to it on my TC encore 30-06 though. We'll just have to wait and see. Anyone else using a scope with target knobs and a very fine crosshair?
 

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Anyone else using a scope with target knobs and a very fine crosshair?
Neither feature is very well suited to a hunting rifle which I assume your .30-06 to be. They are fine on varmint/target rifles but not for big game rifles.
 

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Those tall target knobs get caught on brush and the fine cross hairs are hard to pick up on game with. Most[/color] people would be best suited if they stuck to powers of 10X or less for their hunting rifles. You do not see tall target knobs on a 3X9. If your deer/antelope is too far out there to see with 9X or 10X, then is more than likely too far out to shoot. I can pick up on black birds (about 2" X 4" target) at 250 yards with a 10X. In field conditions it gets very difficult to hold a high power scope still + the field of view is cut down. Just my 2 cents
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I agree that the fine crosshairs would be harder to pick out, but for whatever reason it really seemed to make things easier on me while I was at the range. As far as target knobs go, my nikon 6-18 has the "kind of" target knobs on it, but you also have the caps screwed in on top of them. I wouldn't want the huge ones, but maybe another nikon like the one I have.

When it's all said and done, I'm more of a target shooter with hunting rifles than a hunter with target rifles. I spend much more time at the range then I'll ever get to spend hunting and I'm hoping that makes me a little bit better of a hunter in that department. Now I just have to work on stalking, scents, lures, ...... and everything else.
 

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teddy12b - Everyone has to decide what is best for them. Shooting your hunting rifle in the off season is a must. It makes you more familiar with your gun and gives you confidence when the shot presents itself. Every hunter should be shooting very, very many more rounds at paper than they do at game. Just because you do shoot a lot more at paper, does not make it a target rifle. Ask yourself this question. Did I buy this gun for hunting or did I buy it for a target gun. Let the answer to this be your guide to scopes. You would be surprised at how little difference shooting with 9X power scope is than a 24X scope. The 24X will shoot tighter groups, but not as much as you might think. I would be surprised if it shot even .5 MOA better. Bench rest shooters are trying to get the nth degree of accuracy. They take special care in their reloading, use special guns and use special scopes. Each one of these components will not get you a whole lot more accuracy, but some. A run of the mill hunting rifle with a little care will get you 1" groups @ 100 yards. The gun it self will yield the biggest gain in accuracy, with special care in reloading and scopes coming in second. Hunting rifles do not need that kind of accuracy. Target/varmint guns are not vary well suited to hunting, and hunting guns are not very well suited to target/varmint shooting. If you bought this barrel for target/varmint shooting, why did you choose a 30-06? Why wouldn't you get a 308 or a 260 for long distance target shooting for instance. They have less recoil and in general shoot more accurately than a 30-06. High quality brass is more available and cheaper for a 308 than a 30-06 for instance. I used to think that I had to have a high powered scope for my varmint guns, but I find myself turning it down when I actually get into the field to shoot the critters. I am now doing my paper work at 12X to 16X, not 20X or 24X. I find that even 16X is too high to shoot in the field. Just some thing to think about. Like I said only you know what is best for you. Just do not let the lure of tight groups be your guiding factor if it is a hunting rifle. ;)
 
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