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https://www.crazycrow.com/green-river-blades





14.50$ and you come up with your own handle. Just don't think you are going to drill out those holes on the tang for larger pins. That blade is hardened, drill bit just sang till it burned.


In the end I went cheap and effective. I heated a piece of 3/4" pvc till it was soft, squished it some. Locked the blank in my vise and drove the PVC on with a rubber mallet. When I was done shaping/sanding the PVC I took heavy bank line and cord wrapped it for grip. No it does not look fancy, closer to a prison shank than anything else. But I have a handle that won't split, rust, rot, or come off, and has excellent grip even with a bloody hand.


The blades themselves are IMO awesome. And I am a carbon steel knife Q#$$%.


Just something to consider.


If I was doing it over again I would epoxy one blank, let it cure, drill it for pins, then epoxy the other side, cure, drive in pins. Then shape and sand and finish to your liking.But I like my 2 "End of the world as we know it" knives even if they are nothing to look at. Bit like me in that regard, tough as rawhide and fence wire,

a good working tool. Just short on the fancy side.


Image is nothing, function is all.
 

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Those are quality blades, and yes..just what Russell Green river uses today. I sold many of them when I was in the business. Back in the 1800s of course, Green River was strictly high-carbon blades.However; these high-carbon stainless is the equal of the best Germany has to offer.

You could utilize the holes that are in the blade.. Too complicated for me to explain..I'll see if I can find a video to post.

UPDATE:
Here is a video that shows how the pinning process goes. The good information starts at about the 2 minute mark. Since I generally make 1800 to 1840 "Mountain Man" reproductions, I do it slightly different, in that once the holes are drilled in the wood, I use a slightly larger drill to countersink the holes, then I cut the pins slightly longer than needed, so I can peen the pins over to fit the countersink, thus providing even better retaining power..


If one is careful to use light, aimed taps with a ball peen, they can be peened over without bending the pin. I use either 2 part epoxy or JB Weld to secure the scales. Don't try to peen one side completely, then the other side, or you may not have enough to complete the neglected side.. turn the knife often, so the sides are equally peened.

I use brass brazing rod.

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What is the material in that handle?
I remember the handle was bone, but I don't remember the specific type. :tango_face_sad:

I do remember that it was easy to work with and polished nicely. :tango_face_smile:
 

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I remember the handle was bone, but I don't remember the specific type. :tango_face_sad:

I do remember that it was easy to work with and polished nicely. :tango_face_smile:
Beautiful job... now if you could just hand checker it some, to provide some "blood grip".. It will probably take on a nice patina, over the years.

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