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Discussion Starter #1
I've always though how practical the pump action is and now I find myself looking at a pretty clean old Rem 760 in .30-06. There have been some good comments on these in this forum but I wonder if anyone can give some more insight on them. The main reason I like them is that I know that they are very fast with a follow-up if needed and they carry like a lever-action with regards to balance and handling, and I like levers alot. What are some, if any, downsides to this gun? Thanks....
 

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760

Duhhh!!

Remembering to pump it!!??

I know, much to my embarassment, I HAVE done it (usually use lever or bolt)!
 

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8) yep, I've short stroked mine a few times, trying to be quiet or readying for a follow up shot. The only other negative, and it's minor, the pump action tends to rattle a little bit at times. Other than that, I love it. Bought it when I was 14 and have used it for 30 years. Totally reliable and accurate. Balanced well etc... I'm a leftie, a pump action has been the best compromise for me over the years when I couldnt afford a left hand bolt or semi-auto. One concession, I did change the safety to left hand.
 

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The only down side I can think of is that they aren't available in more cartridges. That rifle and the .358 Winchester would be a marriage made in heaven.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the replies, gentlemen. Actually, L-Roy, I shoot an 870 pump gun alot so the function should'nt be too unfamiliar. I think I'll run on down and pick up that rifle. They are not seen very much around here for some reason so the prices are good. This one's down from $249 to $199. I can't see anything obviously wrong with it. Thanks again...
 

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.35Rem

Hey Guys,
Any good gunsmith could turn a 760-.35Rem into a .358Win in less than thirty minutes. Just rechamber it, and get a .308 case size magazine!

Diligentia, vis, celeritas!
 

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pumps

PA is the center of the pump rifle universe. The 760's were pretty good fire arms but the change to 7600 improved the strength of the lock up. Grice's gun shop in Clearfield, PA often has Remington make a run of Rifles made in non catalogged chambers(25-06, 260, 7mm08). The most recent was 35Rem which sold out quickly. I bought one with the thought that I would have it reamed to either 358 or 35 Whelen but it is so smooth and good shooting that it would be a shame to mess with it. A 35 Rem uses the same magazine clip as The 308 based cartridges by the way. By the way pump rifles do not sacrifice anything in terms of accuracy. I have owned 5 different calibers and have never had any trouble with accuracy especially a 270 Win that was easily a 1 MOA gun with Good handloads. Also, The quick to point and second shot capability in the brush or thick woods is a big plus and being manually operated they action is more reliable than a semi auto. The only problem is short stroking them! Regards, :grin:
 

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760 in .300 Sav.

Yesterday went to a small gunshow. Not much activity I suspect because of the timing. Came across a like new 760 in 300 Sav. I happen to like and reload for the .300 Sav. and I like the 760. I think it would make a great rifle for a granddaughter: if they did not like it, I would just have to keep it. Then I thought about what my wife would have to say about my need to buy it. Being I plan on spending a few thousand on an outboard motor I backed off. A very nice rifle. It was the basic model and was factory tapped for a scope. None had ever been installed. The gun looked like it had just arrived from the factory.

Rather doubt I will again attend a show between Christmas and New Years. A lot of guys looking but very few tables.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I opened this topic by asking about the 760 because I saw one that I was interested in. Too late. Someone nabbed it. It was a 30-06. I also would have preferred a .300 Savage as it is my favorite deer caliber. If it was a .300 I wouldn't have hesitated. Sure is a sweet cartridge out of my old Savage 99.....
 

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Looznit:

I have to agree on the .300 Savage round. In my Dad's house during the 60's it became the domniate deer round. There were three .300 Savages. I recall my bother taking a very nice buck with one on the run. He fire the three rounds so fast that I thought another hunter was firing. All three rounds hit in the chest shoulder area. The old Savage 99 was slick and accurate. I am sure that at the time my Dad :) bought my Remington 760 in .270 :grin: Winchester that if a 760 in the .300 Savage had been on the rack things would have been different. We wintered on the deer meat that ten tags in the fall brought us.

Siskiyou
 

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Bought a 760 in 30/06 back in 1980 when I lived in the Catskill Mtns of NY. Hunted with it for ten yrs and collected a deer a year with it for a stretch of about six years in a row. I'm a lefty and had a lefty safety added. Most groups ran 1 3/4" at 100 yds.
Only downside:
Had two magazines for it, kept one in my pocket as a spare and one in gun so I hunted with 8 rounds with me. One of the magazines was a bit tricky to get latched for some reason. One day I was hunting the mountains and a small black bear was headed my way. Shot at him as he was loping along and missed. He stopped and was staring at me, from about 40 yds away. I jacked another round in and held on his shoulder and....click. Pumped again and another click. Then realized magazine had fallen out of gun from recoil. Bear wised up by this time and took off. Got spare mag out of pocket and got one more round off as bear was headed out of town. Never touched him. Never got another chance at a NY bear.
Sold the gun when I moved to the midwest. No fault of the gun, just "graduated" to bolt actions.
Greg
 

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:D This is my first visit here and I like what I see. One of the main reasons pump rifles are so popular in PA is that it's illegal to hunt with a semi-automatic rifle. If the rules were changed tomorrow, I wouldn't switch. I've killed a ton of whitetails over the years with my .308 Model 760 and a handload using 150 gr. Hornady Spirepoint bullets.
 

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Here is some info on the pumps, only accurate up to 1991 though

REMINGTON SLIDE ACTION RIFLE CHRONOLOGY

1952 Model 760A grade (Tootsie Roll) introduced; No checkering on stock, corncob lines on forearm, dovetailed rear sight, aluminum butt plate. First serial number was 1001, replacing Model 141.

1953 Introduction of ADL grade with cut checkering on high comb stock and five diamond design on forearm, drilled & tapped, grip cap, sling swivels standard. Also BDL Deluxe Special grade offered with select wood. Same calibers available as 760A grade.

1960 Carbine with 18½-inch barrel introduced. Rear sight attached with screws.

1964 New ADL grade with impressed checkering on stock and forearm replaced previous grades. All have Dupont RK-W (Gloss Epoxy) wood finish, grip cap and aluminum butt plate.

1966 Introduced BDL grade with a stepped receiver and impressed basket weave style checkering on forearm and stock with cheek piece in .270, .308 and .30-06 calibers only. Added left hand (buttstock and safety) model in BDL grade. 150th Anniversary model in .30-06 caliber only.

1968 ADL model restyled with skip line press checkering and white line spacers used at black plastic butt plate, black forearm tip and black grip cap. After serial no. 540,773 on 11-26-68, a new serial no. block started and shared with the semi-automatic model 742, starting at 6,900,000.

1974 Rear sight changed to an adjustable ramp configuration. ADL grade checkering design on stock at wrist area modified slightly.

1976 Limited production Bicentennial model with receiver marked with shield and eagle, flanked by scrollwork and “1776-1976”, .30-06 caliber only.

1978 New series of serial numbers started on 1-3-78 for 760 – B7,400,000 and for 742 – B6,000,000.

1981 Model 760 ADL and BDL designations replaced by model 7600 with straight comb stock and impressed checkering. Bolt was changed from fourteen small locking lugs to four larger locking lugs. All carbines discontinued. Introduced model Six with cut checkering on a monte carlo style stock with cheek piece and cartridge head medallion on the bottom of receiver designating caliber of rifle. All warehouse stocks of model 760 were exhausted by April 1981.

1985 Sportsman 76 model in .30-06 caliber with plain hardwood stock introduced. Model Six in .308 caliber introduced.

1986 Model Six in 6mm caliber discontinued. Limited run of carbines in .30-06 caliber only.

1987 Model 7600 carbine with 18½-inch barrel in .30-06 caliber made standard. Limited run of rifles in .35 Whelen caliber.

1988 Model 7600 becomes the second factory rifle chambered for .35 Whelen caliber. Model Six and Sportsman 76 discontinued. Last year to receive RK-W Gloss Finish and white line spacers.

1989 Stock and forearm restyled with satin finish and discontinued use of all white line spacers.

1991 Stock and forearm restyled with cut checkering pattern and monte carlo style stock. Gloss finish offered in .270 and .30-06 calibers only.
 
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