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I'd like people's opinions in regards to what they feel would be the best dog breed to handle both upland game and waterfowl hunting. Many thanks.
 

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I say a Chihuahua. They can really get out there and chase down wounded geese as well as flush quail. ;D

Just kidding. My vote is a Labrador Retriever as they are great with pheasants as well as waterfowl. The best part of them they are great members of the family, especially if you have kids.

Good luck with your choice.
 

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I would have to know where your hunting warm or freezing conditions. In the latter I would have to say Chessie, there great in all weather conditions !
 

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not hot weather ! seen them suffer in a dove field !
same for some black labs , had one , second lab was yellow for that reason , in cold weather she gets a vest !
not meant as a cut I like chessies ! and love labs !
 

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Yes they are better in the cold ,but I have had Labs & drathaarrs they all have to be watched for overheating. The drathaarrs have a hard time in the freezing weather here in ohio. They are all great dogs, but my choise is still the chessie for all around bird dog.
 

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I have a question on dogs not an answer to the question.

(1) When you hunt in a slough or flooded timber standing knee deep in water, where does the dog stand? Does the dog just stand in the water too, or do you have to take some sort of platform for the dog to stand on?

(2) Once a dog has been properly trained, do they mostly retain their training or do they have to be constantly worked to refresh and maintain their knowledge? I go out waterfowl hunting two or three weekends per year. I might go upland bird shooting once per year. If I had a trained dog, would he remain a good hunting dog after three years of this frequency (or INFREQUENCY) of hunting outings?

(3) How much does it cost to have a black laboradour trained as a hunting dog, ball park figure here.

(4) We live in a suburb and have a modest, although not tiny, backyard. Labs are big dogs and like to run. Is it inappropriate or ill advised to have a lab under these circumstances? Are there better hunting breeds for this living situation?

We are full up on dogs in our house right now -- two minature schnauzers and one chihouahaua -- but these dogs won't be with us forever, sadly. One of the schauzers is 10 years old and the other is 8 years old. I've been thinking of getting a hunting dog when we need to restock dogs.
 

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1) I've had my dog stand several times. If it's really cold, I try not to do it, but she doesn't seem to get cold anyway. I've also used a boat, I've tied her to trees a ways off, and I've used the bottom half of my climbing tree stand as a platform. To me, the only real concern is if the dog can't touch. I don't think a dog could take that.

2) I hunt quite a bit more, but I still do some off-season training. They'll never forget retrieving or hunting, but they will forget field stuff like heeling, holding, etc... I probably drill 5 days a week in the summer, 1 day in the water and 4 in the field. The difference between a good dog and great dog is half genetic and half hunting experience.

3) I did it myself. It takes a great deal of time, but it's rewarding. It wasn't a cost thing, it was a quality thing. Once my dog had the basics I hunted specifically for her. I'd go shoot pigeons, rails, doves, etc. Things I wouldn't hunt on my own, but that provided the needed exposure to real birds and real bird smells. I consider game farms to work for this as well.

4) Not inappropriate at all. Just get your dog out. Labs make surprisingly good house dogs.
 

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most hunters take a position where the dog can get on a stump or other structure , some carry or build a strap on seat for them , on occasion i have placed my dog on higher ground up to 30 or so yards away . but no ya can't expect them to thread water !
depending on level of training you desire $ 1500.00 up !
know of one that was $ 40000.00 a real gem of a finished dog ,
my feeling is this if you want a machine a perfect dog , a competition dog then the trainer is the best way to go .
but if you want a hunting dog that learns how you hunt then train it yourself , help from a trainer is good as long as you and the dog get trained together !
and you always train it keeps you in contact with the dog !
a lab adapts well , so if a park or other space is near enough to go to they would do fine ! as long as you take them !
 
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