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Discussion Starter #1
I wanted to share a bit more about the Lee mold .45-70 bullets in 340 and 500 grains I have been using... I use 282 grains of tin solder per one pound of wheel weight material... Here are pictures of one recovered 340 grain bullet shot into a bundle of magazines... front and back shots. I am more than happy with the performance of these bullets...

 

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Ironknees,

Do you know the muzzle velocity of the bullets? What was your depth of magazine penetration?

That looks like the kind of expansion that I'm used to seeing with jacketed bullets!

The Blade
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Sorry, forgot to log in AGAIN. Also, the shots were from 50 yards. So, it's 1300 fps, 50 yards, and penetration of about 8 to 10 inches...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Nope... haven't recovered any from game yet... but then, I haven't shot any game with them yet, so that could be why... :wink:
 

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Tin and Wheelweights

IronKnees, you stated that you use 282 grs. of tin solder to a pound of wheelweights, that comes out to about 4%. You don't need to use that much. You will get better results by using 2%, 140 grs.. Assuming you are using 95-5 solder, I would use about 150 grs. per pound of ww. WW contain about 2.5% antimony and .5% tin. If the amount of tin exceeds the amount of antimony the bullets will age soften, so the amount of tin added should not exceed 2%. After casting I aneal my bullets, by placing them in a 350 deg. oven for an hour, then turn the oven off, and let the bullets cool to room temperature in the oven. This makes the bullets more ductile. You will get nicer mushrooms and less weight loss. 8)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Okay, guess I'll keep that in mind... I do use 141 grains of lead free (tin solder) per pound of wheel weight metal in my .38 special, .45 ACP and other handgun loads, and a couple of rifle loads, but for some that I want harder, I have used the 282 grain formula for a long, long time now... and of course have had GREAT results with it. Interesting... Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I just re-read you post and realized I missed a couple of things in my reply... I also anneal, pretty much the same way you do, or by the drop in cold water method. AND, my bullets absolutely DO NOT soften with age... I have tested batches (I keep a file card in with each batch indicating it's hardness) after they had some age on them, and in every case, they are noticeably harder... just for what it's worth. This, using my Seiko (spelling?) hardness tester...
 

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IronKnees, What load were you using? How was your accuracy?? I also have the Lee 340 mould and shot a pile of em today. Quenched wheel weights-as cast-tumbled in liquid alox-with 15 Gr. of unique--no filler. 1.5" @ 50 yards with Iron sights! Recoil is about like a 30-30. -Flap
 
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