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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to get some very precise reloading dies for the 7-30 waters. I want to make my loads as accurate as possible, so if anyone knows of a brand I should chose (IF any ar better than others), please let me know. I saw somewhere on a website some dies that have markings like a caliper on the seating die to help with seating depth and so forth.
Thanks,
Travis
 

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When I bought my first 7-30 barrel I bought an old set of Lyman's. Can't say I ever really liked them but shot 100 yard groups as small as 0.27" with ammo loaded using them. My current preference is for the Hornady dies with the Micro-Just Seater. I've got to where I hate to load ammo with any other.
 

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The seating dies are nice, but I haven't seen a lot of change in groups from changing seating depth. What interests me is a Lee collet neck sizing die for 7-30. I use one for .223, .243, and .220 Swift. They do seem to give better groups. While Lee does not make one for 7-30, they will do a custom if you send in 5 pieces of fired brass and $60 (??). If you want to experiment, contact them, buy one and let us know if they work.

I use the 7-30 for hunting and while I would like some more accuracy, it works as is. If someone else tries it, I may spend the money.

thanks
mike
 

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This has nothing to do with your question BUT how does one become an EX-CAJUN. I know you can become a dis-placed CAJUN but EX-Cajun is like a "little bit pregnant" either you are or you ain't. :eek:
NOTICE MY SCREEN NAME? is the reason I'm asking. :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well, OK, your right Crawfish. I'm a "displaced" cajun. I've been away from Louisiana (my home state) for so damn long, I've lost the desire for real spicy food! Although, the chilli peppers in New Mexico are starting to revive my tastebuds.
As for the dies, my problem is, I've been reading a book about benchrest shooting and what these guys do to improve accuracy is pretty interesting. I wanted to adapt a few of the tricks to see how good a group I can shoot. I'm getting my 7-30 Waters Improved barrel for my contender from Bullberry's in about a month and feel like I'm starting on the right foot. From what they say in the book, changing seating depth (along with other microscopic adjustments in loads) changes point of impact. Not much but every bit counts. It's all sub MOA which is of course MOD (Minute of Deer) but I just have never had a real tackdriving pistol.
 

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Fred does nice work, you'll be happy. For the dies, I like Redding but also like the Hornady seater that came with my 338 set. The micro seaters are ok but you really dont need them right away as a regular die and some careful measurments will also work. Seating depth and proper headspace can make a big difference in group size. One tool that's helped keep those measurements in line is the Stoney point OAL gauge and the Head and Shoulders gauge for measuring headspace of the brass. Helps you get everything consistant, and that's the key.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks everyone. I appreciate the input. I did some internet reading and heard mostly good things about Redding and Hornady dies. I called Bullberry, spoke to Troy and he said they carry the Redding. He also mentioned they cut the chamber to match the Redding die they carry so I figured then, it was a no brainer.
UPS should have them here in a few days.
Ordered a flash hole deburring tool from Midway to get the cases in shape and now I'm searching for an affordable ball caliper and case neck trimmer to measure neck wall thickness and get my brass all matching and ready to fireform.
All this for 1 deer.
Hopefully I'll get a chance to hunt in Mississippi on my buddy's land or in Louisiana where the woods are infested with whitetails. If not, it'll make a damn fine sillywet gun. I'll have to plan a trip up north here to the Whittington Center, NRA's big range.
 

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Wouldn't really get in a big hurry with the ball caliper neck turner quite yet. (BTW Lyman makes an inexpensive one) I have messed around with that a bit and really haven't gotten any real gains from doing it right off. BUT I have recently had to turn some necks on my 338 JDJ brass because they were getting a bit thick on one side and chambered hard. Now this is after approx 3 trimmings and 10-12 reloadings and a few overly warm loads thrown in there to boot. So far it's only shown up on 3 of the 20 that I use for load development but I'm going to turn them all just enough to even them up. I tried it on my 708 and what I ended up with was a neck that was even but it lost some tension and then accuracy suffered. Just something to think about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks Duffy!
From what I read in the book I'm reading, they suggested trimming the neck untill to about 75%. I'm sure that trimming a badly disfigured caseneck would result in much thinner brass there. If you don't mind, I'd like to hear more explanation on how the accuracy suffered from not enough neck tension. I thought that in a single shot gun, it realy didn't matter how tight the bullet was seated. Can you (or anyone else) elaborate on this?

Thanks,
Travis
 

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Travis,
I belive what was happening was that the lighter neck tension was changing the ignition or psi curve of the load. Now this is in a factory bbl that is very picky about what it's fed. It will shoot pretty good (if I do my part) but small things make big differences. (ie a primer change opens up a group 3/4-1 inch or better.) Now on the other end the SSK bbl just pretty much shoots what you feed it (within reason) What has happened with the brass is that the necks have gotten thicker on one side than the other. (about .001-.0015) The first sign of this problem was that I noticed a couple of rounds chambered firmly and when I removed them there was a shiny high spot on the neck. Well this just so happened to line up perfectly with the base of the bullet. Sooo what this told me was that the bullets were being pushed off center by the thicker brass and when I measured the runout they where off quite a bit. Off to the neck turning tool and sure enough the neck was thicker opposite of the high spot. But, I just take off enough to just even up the necks and no more. Most of the time it won't even touch one half of the neck, plus it still leaves them at the proper thickness for good neck tension when sized through a standard die. You have to remember that the BR guys are thinning them down because their chambers are very tight and a standard thickess brass simply wont chamber or will create high psi upon firing. That is the only reason for thinning them down less than the standard thickness. They also have bushing dies that will size the brass back to the proper neck tension which can't be done with a standard die. Most usually stive for a .003 fit on the necks but that could be different depending on what the bbl likes. I have to also say I am not a BR shooter, pro or otherwise. I just like like messing around with the mechanics of reloading/shooting/hunting to see what works and what doesnt. Some of this stuff will drive you totaly crazy! Just as long as your safe, have fun and learn something that's what everyones here for. 8)
 
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