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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
I hope someone out there can help. I am looking to make a rolling block in 45-70. Which of the old military calibers/action is best to use for this? I am looking to add to my collection and I just like to tinker. Looking for a starting point.
Any help would be GREATLY appreciated,
Thanks,
Dennis
 

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rolling block action

Dennis,

The best starting point for your .45-70 rolling block project would be a complete action or rifle in the Model 1902 7mm series. This particular model is best suited because it is the strongest of the military rolling blocks, and it has the small firing pin and breechblock firing pin hole.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks,
I'll start looking for one of those.
Dennis
 

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John Traveler is right; the 1902 (I think it's also known as the #5) with the block lever extending out to the side instead of upward is the strongest action. It was designed for rimless, smokeless cartridges like the 7x57.

If you find an older Roller in good shape for a reasonable price, I'll be happy to take the worthless piece of junk off your hands for a few bucks.

Actually, for a BPCR any of the older Rollers in good shape are also very good if they are in good condition. Remington was said to have used some of the best steel of any of the manufacturers. There is no reason to steer away from the models having the large firing pins; some people who build custom rifles actually prefer them to the smaller firing pins.

Clarence
 

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John Traveler, Is the 1902 action any stronger than the 1897 which is also a #5 ? From all I can tell, my 1897 is just like my 1902's except the breech block lever turns up just like the #1. It also has the larger barrel shank and small firing pin like the 1902.
 

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Remington Rolling Block

JCP,

The model 1897 and 1902 use the Number 5 action, and have the same strength and heat treating designed for smokeless powder. The only difference I've noticed is that Remington apparently used sliding bar extractors on early 1897's and the rotary extractors on later 1902 models.

For a .45-70 rifle, there is nothing wrong with the earlier BP rolling block actions, as long as the firing pin hole/firing tip pin are in good shape, and the action is correctly barreled and fitted. Very early BP actions lack the firing pin retractor, and should be avoided.

Contrary to what some shooters believe NO RUGER-level loads for any of these rolling block rifles, PLEASE!
 

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Thanks John, Today at the C&E gunshow at Charlotte NC I actually saw a #5 Roller chambered for 30-06. The man selling it said it had been reamed out to shoot blanks for hollywood movies. This makes it even more dangerous because the bore is still 7MM. I advised him to plug or remove the barrel before some gets hurt.
 
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