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Hello and thanks for your input. I am debating which of these two to get for a new deer gun. The lease we hunt in western Oklahoma is WIDE open, lots of tree stand hunting, ground blinds, and 200-300 yard shots over alfalfa and wheat fileds are the norm.

Began looking at the 257 Wby Mag, but dang, the ammo is high.
I am looking at the Savage model 12 varmit rig (SS/Lam) 26" tube
and a Tikka in the 7-08. Also, any opinions on bi-pods would greatly welcomed too.

So gents, let's hear the pro's and cons. Thanks for the input and have a great 4th o'July.

Sincerely,

OUrabmen
 

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i did the exact same thing....came down to the .25-06, the .270, and the 7mm-08.

i chose the 7mm-08 because:

1) it has more energy further from the muzzle, and
2) it has the ability to be used with heavier bullets in case i want to use it for something bigger than deer, and
3) it is said to pack less recoil than the others and since i wanna shoot for fun and not for pain, thats up my alley.

-Matt
 

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mjbgalt said:
i did the exact same thing....came down to the .25-06, the .270, and the 7mm-08.

i chose the 7mm-08 because:

1) it has more energy further from the muzzle, and
2) it has the ability to be used with heavier bullets in case i want to use it for something bigger than deer, and
3) it is said to pack less recoil than the others and since i wanna shoot for fun and not for pain, thats up my alley.

-Matt
I agree and I'll add one more to that list:

4. Great performance for less powder(for handloaders).

At the end of the day, in most situations, there is no substitute for calibre and 7mm-08, while not as flat as a 257 Wby, is a great long distance cartridge.
It made its name in metallic silohuette and it's much kinder to the shoulder.
If all you do is hunt deer and you don't mind forking out for cases & powder go ahead with the 257 but a 7mm-08 is far more flexible.
 

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I have to say the 7mm-08 also. I picked a Winchester Classic Compact up not too long ago and i love it. Shoots great too. haven't got to hunt with it yet but it will probably be all i carry this season for hogs and deer.
 

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I have used the 25-06 and 100 gr. Sierra bullets for years on everything from rabbits (head shots) to deer and elk. I have killed a bunch of deer and elk with that round at all types of ranges. I have NEVER lost an animal with the 25-06. I've never had to track an animal I shot with the 25-06.

I do consistant lung shot and don't try any fancy head shots or neck shots.

The 25-06 is fast and flat and the hydrostatic shock to the lung with the fast flying bullet turns the lungs into jello.

I'm not knocking the 7-08....just telling you what I have done IN PRACTICE as apposed to in theory or what the books have to say. By the way, the 25-06 is an easy shooting gun that seems to be very, very accurate with the 100 grain sierra.

My first 25-06 bolt action rifle shot a 3 shot group I could consistantly cover with the base of the cartridge. My new Encore 26" 25-06 barrel, with very little testing yet is shooting a 4 shot 100 yard group of 0.44. That's with a 3x9x40 tasco cheap-o scope on it....don't know what I would be shooting group-wise with some decent glass to look through.
 

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All are great hunting cartridges (including the .257 Weatherby - my two have performed great), but a compromise could be the .260. You can kill grizzleys with 140-grain bullets just fine, and the .260 shines as a long range target cartridge with slightly less recoil than the 7-08. I've killed deer and caribou with mine, and shooting targets at 600 yards with 107-grain VLD bullets is great fun without getting beat up by recoil. You really can't go far wrong with any of them. :D
 

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Lone Star said:
You can kill grizzleys with 140-grain bullets just fine,
Well, you can probably kill elephants with 140 grainers too but I'm not lining up to try.
No one is impugning the 25-06 or 257 Wby, it's just that at the end of the day calibre counts.
Deer are one thing, but I'll leave .25 cal shots on elk to others.
A bigger cal provides less margin for error and for bigger game this is an important factor.
 

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Well, you can probably kill elephants with 140 grainers too but I'm not lining up to try.
I think that you do realize that if the original poster wants to use a 7-08 class cartridge, the difference in performance on large game between a 140/.264 bullet and a 160/.284 bullet is minimal - that was my point. He was asking about the suitability of this class of cartridge for deer and perhaps larger game. My hunting partner used his M788 in .308 to kill several inland grizzleys with 165-grain bullets before he got a .375; oddly, his hunting and shooting skill made the little 7.62 work fine. Of course it isn't the optimum choice, but that wasn't the original poster's question, was it?

BTW, I've killed two grizzleys (actually one was a brownie) - how many have you? :D
 

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I feel the 7mm-08 would be a good choice!

It was first introduced to shoot metallic silhouettes at all distances and proved itself well!

Remember, it's up to the one behind the trigger to do the homework! Practice (a lot) at the distances you expect to shoot!

Good Luck;
 

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Lone Star said:
I think that you do realize that if the original poster wants to use a 7-08 class cartridge, the difference in performance on large game between a 140/.264 bullet and a 160/.284 bullet is minimal - that was my point. He was asking about the suitability of this class of cartridge for deer and perhaps larger game. My hunting partner used his M788 in .308 to kill several inland grizzleys with 165-grain bullets before he got a .375; oddly, his hunting and shooting skill made the little 7.62 work fine. Of course it isn't the optimum choice, but that wasn't the original poster's question, was it?

BTW, I've killed two grizzleys (actually one was a brownie) - how many have you? :D
I haven't killed any grizzlies or brownies, not that it makes my point any less valid.
I don't doubt that your friend used his .308 to great effect.
But it still remains that non-mag mid-cal cartridges aren't really suitable for dangerous game, and that's what bears are.
And actually there wasn't any reference in the original post to "perhaps larger game[/color]".
Lone Star, I question neither your abilities or your experience but in the same way I'd not advise anyone to head out after a buffalo here in Australia without anything short of a 338 Win Mag I think grizzlies especially are not a game animal to hypothesise about. :?
Sorry if I seem in a mood to argue. :|
And to settle you mind on any other claims I agree that the 260 Rem or 6.5x55 are superb deer rounds practically on par with a 7mm-08 that deliver beyond their capabilities on paper, as does the 7x57 when properly loaded.
You will have to forgive me for liking 7mm a bit better than 6.5 just 'cos I think it's cooler. :wink:
 

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Kombi1976: You are right, the OP didn't mention larger game, that was in the second post, my mistake. But realize that I did not recommend these light calibers for large game! They can be used, and there is no difference between the .260 and the 7-08 for that role. That is all I said. Heck, I know a guy who shot a grizz with a .22LR and killed it with one shot - but I'd not recommend that.

My comment about your "inexperience" with shooting grizzleys makes my point very well. Those who have not hunted the big bears may not realize that many times these great creatures can be shot with virtually no danger to the hunter. Inland grizzley can often be seen feeding on open hillsides and can be shot successfully at 200-300 yards. The inland bears are generally not nearly as large as the coastal bears either. For this kind of hunting, cartridges like the .270 and 7mm Mags are often used, not because they are intended to be bear rifles, but because the hunter is after sheep, goats or caribou, he happens to see a grizzley on a hillside, so he uses what he is carrying. In this instance, shooting a grizzley at 250 yards is no more dangerous than shooting a sheep at that distance. When aproaching any dead game in this country, the wise hunter is ready to defend his game from other predators of opportunity at any time.

Hey, if you like the 7mm best that's just fine. Actually I'm more of a fan of the .257s and the .458s, but I realize that some folks prefer the .243s and the .375s. It is after all whatever floats your boat, but in reality much of the ballistic splitting of hairs is simply mental masturbation. :D
 

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ourabmen
I would like to look at what you will do with this gun as closely as possible.
The reason that I say this is because both guns will do the main job you
call for but yet they are quiet different as to the other things that they excell at.
I have a 25-06 that I am very fond of which is set-up like the Savage you
are looking at (a Sendero). You are right for looking at this barrel length
to extract the velocity possible with this great cartridge. Here are some
advantages of going with a 25-06. I list these because I do not know the
other things you may do with this weapon.
1. This is an outstanding varmit round. It is not good for high volume
shooting such as prairie dogs, most people myself included use smaller
rounds such as 223 for that, but for windy days & longer yardages
shooting groundhogs & larger it is one of the best.
2. It & the .257 Wea. are the best Antelope rounds one can possible use.
3. It is one of the flattest shooting non-magnum rounds commonly in use.
4. The recoil especially with the heavier barreled versions is very mild.
5. 3 & 4 make it easier than most cartridges to become very proficient
in long range shooting.
6. The bullet construction in this caliber seem to be very deadly with deer
size & smaller game. Some bullets like the TSX though has somewhat
egualized this however.
The 7-08 has advantages too.
1. It is an excellent woods/small tree stand gun because most of it's
potential can be realized with a shorter barrel & a lighter gun/short
action
2. It has all the power necessary for short to medium shots on Black
Bear & even Elk . A 25-06 can too but the heavier bullets of the 7-08
give it a little edge here.
3. There are alot of Target bullets available in 7mm & this round would
have an edge in Target/Sil/Bench Rest or Long Range Comp. shooting
that is at least where the yardages are known.
4. Actually both rounds are low in recoil.
5. If you have children or a wife that may want to take up the sport, the
7-08 due to being able to set-up a light & short package would be a
little better for them.
There is some overlap here but I am just showing where one has at least a slight edge over the other.
You said that 200-300 yards is the norm. If that means that over 300 yards will sometimes happen then the 25-06 will have an edge because of its better trajectory especially if you don't have time to use a range finder which many times in Deer hunting you don't.
In summary, I would choose according to the other possible uses I pointed out.
HOWEVER IF I ONLY DID THE HUNTING THAT YOU MENTION IN OK. &
THAT'S IT, I WOULD CHOOSE NEITHER ONE! I WOULD BUY A .270 WSM!
The reason is that with a 24" barrel bolt gun it would weigh between a
light 7-08 & a heavy 25-06 so obviously that would not be an issue.
With a good recoil pad like a limb saver & a little more weight than a
7-08 recoil would not be a concern either. THis gun would have the
TRAJECTORY OF A 25-06(ACTUALLY A LITTLE BETTER THAN FACTORY
25-06) & BULLET WEIGHTS OF THE 7-08 FOR THE ADVANTAGES OF BOTH!

Just a little different perspective!

Concerning shooting aids, I like the Harris bipods in the shorter version
with fixed stops. I have a couple of the longer ones & they are not quiet
as useful. I now use the Short Harris & carry Stoney Point shooting sticks
for when I have to sit instead of prone to shoot over Sage & such.

I hope this helps! Rod Smith Pocahontas, AR.
 

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Get the Savage in the .25-06. Flatter shooting, drops deer like they were hit by lighting and will survice for larger non-dangerous game like Elk. On top of that the Savage is the most accurate out of the box rifles being offered today. Lawdog
:D
 
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