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I am going to hunt with my bow for the first time next October. I have a compound bow that I have practiced with and I can consistently hit a 6" target at about 20 yards. I believe my draw weight is around 35-40# or so. I've been shooting aluminum arrows and have 4-bladed broadheads for hunting. I will be hunting small to medium-sized whitetail deer and have set up my stand location so that I have the best chance at getting a shot within this range.

From you experienced bow hunters out there: what are your suggestions on how to go about getting ready? Is my equipment adequate? Do I need more range or power to be effective? Your input is appreciated. :p
 

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advice...

#1 be proficient with your weapon.
2 know your limits and stay within them.
3 only take BROADSIDE shots at animal looking anywhere than at you.
4 control your scent/ play the wind. it is my experience that no matter how well you try, s soon as your set up the wind will change directions on you. so do your best to control your scent.
5. dont fall into the gimick trap. every year manufacturers come out with something "new and improved" or 3 feet per second faster. it doesnt matter. put a good shot on a relaxed animal (with luck) things will turn out.
6 dont get frustrated. bowhunting aint easy, i hunted 15 years before i scored. but you sure will enjoy it. just dont force it, and dont get frustrated.
...gotta go. will write more tommorrow.
 

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Pro Shop

Find a pro shop and just visit a few times first. Find out if they really care about the customer. If they don't, then find another until you find one that cares. Then ask them questions. It never hurts to actually buy something, even if it is a small purchase. There is a wealth of knowledge/information there, free for the asking. Heed myronman3's advice, too.
 

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New to bowhunting.

One thing that really opened my eyes about taking game with a bow, was a 3-d range. Not only does it encourage you to become better with your equipment, but gives you a better understanding of arrow placement on the animal's body. You can easily see where the arrow would have gone if it had been the body of a live animal. Rehersal reduces stress....hope this helps. Jeff :D
 

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another piece of...

good advice, jeff. there is nothing like 3-d targets to teach shot placement and angles one shoould try for.
 

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heres a good piece of advise

go out and try to bag some rabbits with that bow.. when you can get
one fairly consistantly... youve gotten good with that bow...
 

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I have several women and young adults that are shooting in the 40 to 45 lb range and several have taken deer with the setup. The key is to have good matched arrows to the bow and all were using fixed blade broadhead that cut on contact heads. 3D is great to get ready for the season and or just 3 bales of hay and keep on shooting.
 

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:D Interesting on bow weight. I have been hunting with a recurve,and longbow for over fourty years. I have seen and taken deer with a 25 lb bow when I was younger,lots younger. A 25 is about as low as you really wanna go but then im talking a recurve,not a cable bow. If the arrow is placed in the correct spot,heart lung,you will have venison. If not ya gunna have a long walk to get it,if ya gets it. I would rather not have a shoot through,even tho it leaves a better blood trail. I would rather have a solid chest hit,and have the head in the critter to do some additional cutting as it ran. It makes for a shorter run,if a run at all. A shoot through is not needed guys,a lot of it is tv hype for more bow speed,more toys and such on the arrows. A good clean shot is all ya need,shoot through or not........King
 

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Trail

Yeah King, but I'm blind in one eye and can't see very well out of the other and kind of need to just feel for the slippery stuff on the ground and you get more of that if you have two holes to leak it instead of only one!!
 

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:D L-Roy. I agree with ya on that. I like a heavy blood trail also. It makes the recovery a lot simpler and thats for sure. As a matter of fact,I really cant remember not having the arrow penitrate through both side of the animal. I shoot eskimo heads,and you can shave with them. A truely sharp head is worth a lot if the hit is a little bit off from where ya want it to be. A number of years ago the famouse moving/instant bush managed to get between my hunting partner and a nice little 4 point. The arrow was deflected into the hind leg,just under the pelvis bone. That head made it into the femoral artery,and after the hit,the deer only went about 30 yards,and went down. I somethimes have a problem seeing also,and I have been accused of being blind in both eyes upon occasion when tracking. Was wondering where ya went to,have not been seeing ya crop up fer a while. Stay safe. King
 

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One suggestion is for a light weight bow use cut on contact broadheads. My youngest daughter uses a 45 lb. pull Jennings she bought about five years ago and she got a nice 3 point mule deer this last year. 30 yards and the arrow went clean thru the deer. And like the rest have said PRACTICE and when you think your good enough PRACTICE some more. And not just at targets on the range, field practice. Get out and try stalking some rabbits, shoot at stumps. Remember that shooting outdoors, at game, sometimes requires you to shoot from other positions besides standing. Lawdog
 
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