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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A lady I was working for gave me an 1859 New Model Rem Army-Richardson Arms .44 a few weeks back. Seems like it is in good shape. The hand spring was not functioning right but I fixed that. I know that since I really don't know much about this particular gun it might be best not to be shot. But, I have had a few 'smith friends give it the o.k. What is a standard load? It will probably become a sidearm during the ML deer season so I would like to what is a safe but adequately powerfull load. Is it even possible to overload a BP revolver with BP to the point of danger given todays steel cylinders? What is a good powerfull load and what kind of velocity might I expect? What brand of powder? BP or sub.?

bfa
 

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I would suggest a load of 35grs of BP or sub except 777. 777 is powerful stuff and 30 gr nearly knocked me on my keester. I use it in rifle though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I forgot some vital info. The revolver is a brass frame model. Would I assume that this would shorten the life of the piece under heavy recoil? It would not have been my choice of BP revolvers... but it was a gift horse.

bfa
 

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Hold up on that load I gave you. Use that gun for a wall hanger. A load to take hunting or defense would probably rock that gun apart. That is why they tell you no conversions to be put into brass framed guns too. Liability thing, I suppose.
You could down load it to 25gr and shoot CAS with it. That is mild.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah, I have been around guns and shooting all my life, so I knew to check this thing out a little first. The brass frame kinda spooked my mule. I did visit a local ML shop at lunch. The owner said the gun looked unfired. He suggested that 28gr fff would be a max. Absolute max load. For volume shooting. He seemed to thing that it probably would not come apart since the cylinder was solid, but that it would punish the frame and cause it to loosen up if I repeatedly pounded it with heavier loads. I handled a Walker while I was there. Man what a chunk of steel. I go 6ft and 230, but that thing really put a strain on my right arm. I may pick up another Color Casehardened framed gun for a sidearm during the whitetail season. Thanks for the reply, sorry I left out such important information.

bfa
 

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BFA:

I used to trade with a little blackpowder shop in Little Rock for years. Assume it is still in business...R&L Gun Shop. Just off I30 south of town.

A fella named Roy owns the place. If your close, it might be worth your while to stop by and see what he has in stock. If he didn't have it...you didn't need it! Roy is also a good resource if you've got a question or two...great guy!

Be Safe! ...Chris :D


...how 'bout them hogs!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Chris,

Just looked R&L up in the phone book. Seems the shop is about a mile from where I sit all day. I will check them out. What took you from South west Little Rock to the Republik of Kalifornia?

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1858 Remington Cap & BAll

(6/4/03) BABY FAT ARKY: I've owned several cap n ball revolvers, including a 1858 Rem (steel frame). In my experience the only brass frame revolvers that should only be used for wall hangers are Colt style revolvers. That style of revolver have no top strap & the strain of seating the ball over a period of time loosens the steel cylinder pin in the frame. Had a Navy Arms (brass frame) Griswald & Gunnison 44 that happened to. I agree about shooting less than 30 gr fff, my 1858 Rem gave me no problems & yours should do fine. I've always wanted a 1847 Walker, but with my Ruger SS Old Army I can get 45 gr fff & wonder wad & still seat the ball. Good shooting....Ken :D :D
 
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