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Discussion Starter #1
ok hi all i am new to reloading.

i have a few ?s

i would like to know what i need to start reloading in particular 9mm for now and if i can get a full setup with the brass and bullets and powders and primers for around $250 to $300

Can you guys give me a list to help me i Know i have to get a couple reloading books plan on doing that soon.ty in advance :grin:
 

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First you need a press. I'd suggest a lee turret press not the greatest for loading rifle ammo but for a pistol it's great.
Then dies lee are the least expensive and work well.
Brass if you've been shooting awhile you probably have that if not you can probably get it locally.
Primers powder and bullets are up to you get a couple manuals and see what there is data for i suggest RCBS and Speer.
And if you plan on using the brass for more than a couple reloads you'll need a case trimmer again i'll suggest the lee.
You should come in under $300 but that depends on what you get.
 

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The first thing you need is a good reloading manual. PERIOD

My personal favorite for beginning reloaders is the Lyman. It will explain everything you need, with descriptions of your choices with pro's and con's of each.
 

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To add to ButlerFord45's reply, the Lyman manual for pistol & rifle has jacketed and lead bullet data. It's a great place to start.
 

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I recently got setup to reload for 45 colt

about $200 for a
4 hole auto indexing Lee turret press deluxe kit
set of dies
1lb of powder
100 winchester bullets
100 winchester primers
with tax

then spent about another $100 bucks on casting equiptment and lead
and recently just bought a Lee auto prime hand tool, and lee universal depriming die, so i don't have to resize the brass everytime for another $20

soon prolly going buy another pound of powder and a box for primers or about $40 bucks

so total for me so far has been about $360 to start pumping em out in quanity.
 

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to SA shooter

How do you get away with not sizing the brass before reloading it.?Doesn't seem like you'd get any friction on the bullet to build up pressure against.Are you just neck sizing,and does that work?

Inquirng mind , ya know. 8)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
got a link for lymans site or where to find the manual
and ty all for the quick responses
what would be a good digital scale to get. :D
 

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I'm staying out of this one, especially after reading all the different advice given.

We have one guy who doesn't resize his brass, another who claims you have to trim 9mm brass, and another who buys primers 100 at a time.

Oh, the **** I'm going to stay out of this!

Buy the RCBS Rock Chucker kit and the RCBS Accessory kit. Get yourself a set of RCBS carbide taper crimp dies and an RCBS shellholder.

Now, after you get all that stuff home, open the box that has the Rock Chucker kit. Take out the Speer manual, close the box, and read the manual three times.

Oh, and forget about a digital scale, at least for now...

If you shop well, you can get the two RCBS kits for around $300. They will include:
Rock Chucker Supreme Press
5-0-5 scale
Uniflo powder measure
Speer reloading manual
Hand priming tool
Hex key set
2 case loading blocks
Case lube kit
Powder funnel
Deburring tool
Powder measure stand
Powder trickler
Primer pocket brushes
Stainless steel caliper
and case neck brushes

A 3-die carbide taper crimp RCBS set should run you around $33, and the shell holder another $4.
 

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You can go two ways: single stage press or progressive (i.e., slow or fast). If you work for a living and plan to shoot more than about 50 rounds per week, then go with a progressive. Specifically a Dillon 550. Getting set up well with a progressive will cost about $600. You'll need the press, dies, a good scale, some extra priming tubes, and a set of allen wrenches. Don't let anyone try to convice you that you need to start with a single-stage (slow) press because you're a beginner. If you need lots of cartridges, you won't be happy with a single stage.

If you don't want to shoot a lot or have a few hours per week to devote to reloading, then the RCBS Rockchucker kit, RCBS hand priming tool, and a set of dies will get you set up very nicely. The Rockchucker kit costs more than some others but it will last a lifetime and the equipment is of very high quality.

Dillon claims 500 rounds per hour with their 550 model. I get about 250 if I include all steps from the time I start setting up to the time I am done reloading and start washing my hands.

I get about 50 rounds per hour with the Rockchucker.

Generally the advice given here is very good. You get better results by asking pointed questions.

Wear eye protection. Wearing thin vinyl gloves (like surgical gloves, but more resistant to wear) is a good idea too because it makes it easier to clean up afterward.

You will want a case tumbler not long after starting reloading. These cost about $80 to $100.

Avoid Lee products. That's my best advice.

For powder, consider Winchester 231. It's a versatile handgun powder that is easy to work with. For bullets, try round nosed cast 9mm bullets to see if they work well in your gun. They're a lot cheaper than jacketed bullets and they cause a lot less wear on the barrel.
 

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ButlerFord45 said:
The first thing you need is a good reloading manual. PERIOD

My personal favorite for beginning reloaders is the Lyman. It will explain everything you need, with descriptions of your choices with pro's and con's of each.
Just start with this advice. I can't improve on it, so I thought I'd just reinforce it in your mind.
 

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Just my opinion --- I don't think any new reloader should start with anything but a single stage press / Why because it makes them do all the steps one at a time.

Some people don't like Lee products i do / For someone just starting out it is a low cost unit and if you decide to not reload your not out alot.

ALWAYS /ALWAYS get a reloading manual or two and read - read - read before you ever try to load your first round :money:
 

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crazyhorse said:
ok hi all i am new to reloading.

i have a few ?s

i would like to know what i need to start reloading in particular 9mm for now and if i can get a full setup with the brass and bullets and powders and primers for around $250 to $300

Can you guys give me a list to help me i Know i have to get a couple reloading books plan on doing that soon.ty in advance :grin:
I just recently got set up. I got the Lee turret kit for $79 from Cabelas, added the Lee perfect powder measurer for $14 got calipers for $39 and was set except for dies, powder, primers and bullets. I got dies for 38/357 and 44sp/mag for $19.95 each. So far I cranked out about 1000 rounds and have had a blast. The reloading is as much fun a s shooting.

Oh yea I did get a brass polisher from Cabelas for $39 ( I think).

Cast bullets have been costing about $20/500 for Laser Cast, primers $16.85/1000. So far I have tried Titegroup (which I realy like) and Unique. I live near a Cabelas so stuff is easy to get fro a reasonable price. have fun.
 

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Lee Manual

SA shooter said:
I recently got setup to reload for 45 colt

about $200 for a
4 hole auto indexing Lee turret press deluxe kit
set of dies
1lb of powder
100 winchester bullets
100 winchester primers
with tax

then spent about another $100 bucks on casting equiptment and lead
and recently just bought a Lee auto prime hand tool, and lee universal depriming die, so i don't have to resize the brass everytime for another $20

If yu buy a Lee Turret Press get the Lee Manual. It has info on die set up and what autodisc or Lee dipper to use for different loads. I paid about 10 bucks for mine and it is well worth it if you use Lee equipment. I also like the Hornady Manual.
soon prolly going buy another pound of powder and a box for primers or about $40 bucks

so total for me so far has been about $360 to start pumping em out in quanity.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
i think because of money for the time being i will start out with the lee reloader then once i get good and learn on it i will go to the rcbs reloaders


i will probably be reloading for .40s&w and 9mm
i have to hi-point carbines that is what i will be reloading for 1 in .40s&w and 1 in 9mm.
both are for hunting small game up to coyote or fox size game

im splitting the powder between the $73.50
2 1/2 pounds for the 9mm and 2 1/2 pounds .40s&w

for the 9mm could you help me figure out the Reloading cost per rnd with this list.

rainier 9mm 115 Grain Plated Round Nose- $39.99/thousand =
5.0grns Blue Dot- $$67.08/5 lbs (35000 grns) =
CCI 500 x 2 - $16.11/thousand =
winchester bulk Brass 100rnd x 3 $9.84/thousand=

Total = rd or per box of 50, for 100.



for the .40s&w could you help me figure out the Reloading cost per rnd with this list.

Winchester 40/10mm, 180 gr, JHP-$43.75/thousand =
8.2 grns Blue Dot- $$67.08/5 lbs (35000 grns) =
Winchester Small Pistol x 3- $14.65/thousand =
winchester bulk Brass 100rnd x 5 $13.74/thousand=

Total = rd or per box of 50, for 100.


ty all for the help and this is one load i was looking at for each of them if you have other suggestions let me know like i said me new to this.

the reason i went this way i looked at stevespages.com reloading data for the 9mm and .40s&w was the same powder so it be easier on me

http://stevespages.com/355_1_147.html
http://stevespages.com/400_1_180.html
 

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Discussion Starter #17
jgalar said:
I don't shoot 147 grain in my 9mm, but I have had good results using other rainier bullets. Here is the 147 grain hollowpoint from Midway:
http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=435916

Here is rainiers's website which also has loading data:
http://www.rainierballistics.com/mainframe.htm

They would save you a few bucks. I would try smaller quantities anyway before ordering 1000. You may find a 115 or 124 grain bullet that shoots better.


ty for the midway site i forgot about them and that is the cheapest of seen the raniers for 500 for 28 bucks not bad at all the 147 is for bigger animals as in bigger than squirrel or rabbits 115 is for the little guys.

i found this review over on midway about the rainier 9mm 115s and look at what i found out
look at the bold part
Lance Dickison of Chouteau, OK

Review:
If you're one of those folks looking for a projectile that works well in not only your pistol but a light caliber carbine, this is it. I molly coated several hundren rounds with the Midway material and finished them off with a very light polishing in some old, loaded-up media to produce an excellent steel-grey thin molly coating. Tried them in a young gentelman's Highpoint Carbine who wanted some help getting his gun sighted in and man!; That decidedly inexpensive little rifle was throwing 100 yard groups in the 1.5" range consistently with iron sights. If you are reasonably responsible about cleaning your gun, I recommend this projectile with Unique as you can get good velocities and excellent case fill without going over the top on pressures, which you need to be careful with on 9mm anyway. The Second Amendment is the cornerstone of the US Constitution and human freedom! Please support the legislators who defend it.
 

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Crazyhorse,
Not counting brass, (you can pick it up by the buckets at the range) your cost per round for loading the 9mm is about .066 per round. That figures out to just under $3.50 per box. The .40 about 30% more due to the increased powder charge and bullet cost. Still a bargin. I haven't loaded any 9mm for a year or so due to the low cost of the Blazer ammo at Academy Sports. About $82 per K out the door.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Savage said:
Crazyhorse,
Not counting brass, (you can pick it up by the buckets at the range) your cost per round for loading the 9mm is about .066 per round. That figures out to just under $3.50 per box. The .40 about 30% more due to the increased powder charge and bullet cost. Still a bargin. I haven't loaded any 9mm for a year or so due to the low cost of the Blazer ammo at Academy Sports. About $82 per K out the door.
ty savage that is what i was looking for 3.50 a box is cheap and i can tailor the load to what im looking for now i have to find me a range nearby my house.

and if your figuring +30 percent for the .40s&w that would come out to $4.55 alot cheaper then $9 or $10 a box of 50
 

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crazyhorse said:
i will probably be reloading for .40s&w and 9mm
i have to hi-point carbines that is what i will be reloading for 1 in .40s&w and 1 in 9mm.
One thing about HiPoints is that they are particular about cartridge length. I've seen loads published for 147 grain 9MM that are over SAAMI max length. Not a safety issue, but they won't feed in a HiPoint. I know that for sure, because I've tried it. :oops:
 
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