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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have the opportunity to do some night hunting on my next hog hunt, something I've never tried before. I've got the light with red lens that my guide recommended, but I have a question about the crosshairs. How easy will it be to see them at night? Would one of the crosshair illuminators be worth the $13 or so it would cost? Any experience you've had on this would be appreciated. Is night hunting as fun as I think it might be? We'll be hunting days as well on this one, but I figure we could try this as a little bit of a change of pace. (I also asked this question on the optics page, just to be honest). Thanks for the input.
 

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Can't help you on the red light, I never had to use one. I've always planned my hog hunting trips to coincide with the full moon, which provides ample illumination for shooting with a good scope. I can tell you that hunting at night is a hoot! It's almost creepy to not know just where the hog is coming from. I've hunted them over feeders this way and usually you don't know they're there until you hear corn crunching. Closer inspection through the scope reveals them though. I've also stalked feeding hogs by moonlight, now that's a lot of fun! In low light situations, I think a good scope will collect enough of that red light to make the crosshairs visible enough for good shot placement, even on black hogs.
 

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Flatlander,

I responded to your question regarding the "cheap" illuminated reticles. STAY AWAY FROM THEM - they're a joke.

As for night hunting - I have never used a "red" light, just natural light from a 1 million candle power spotlight, and I could see the cross hairs without any problems.

Zachary
 

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Flatlander.... I've never hunted hogs at night but, two young fellows in my lease used to hunt them at night. I think they carried a car battery to the stand and just used a regular Q-Beam. I think they just sat there in the dark until they heard corn crunching. Turned on the light and pop one or two. As far as I know they didn't use a red lens.

Some of the "game farms" over here actually have lights rigged up over the feeders just for night hunting. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I don't think we'll be quite in that situation yet. The guy that owns the land we're hunting on claims that the hogs can't see the red light and don't know you are there. I guess we'll find out when we get there. It should be fun all the same. I think that there are some feeders on one section of his property that we can use if we can't find them stalking them regularly. Man, I'm getting excited just talking about it!
 

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I have killed probably 60 hogs at night. We use standard spotlights-white light and scoped rifles. As long as you have the light on the hog you will be able to see your crosshairs without a problem.

It is actually much easier to use a scope at night than to try and line up the front and rear sights on an open sighted rifle. We have begun using a Sams Club spotlight, rechargeable 2 million CP, they are excellent. Most of the rechargeables we have had in the past were garbage but these things really work well. They will hold a charge quite well and the no cord is nice when you are dressing them out in the dark.
 

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There are some methodes...

Hi,...i'm new comer here!
I interested in this topic since "night hunt" is the most preferable method and legal here in my country. I 90% night hunt. :) and wildboar is the game.
Let me share on this thread...
1. I think you can use both strong spotlight or the red lens. I myself more like the first one. The light possibly to make their eyes "blind" in a moment while we can easily see them! In a not foggy night and open terrain, i can shoot them at around 250meter range with 1million CP spotlight, even more. I would say i'm specialist on this...8) Sometimes i use a Bushnell rangefinder, but you can also judge the range "more easy" if you're familiar with the field and have many experiences in "range's judging".
It is common here night hunting in "a team" (3-5persons) using a 4wheeler/jeep that has a "special construction" on top of the roof.
I "4wheelers hunting" in open terrain and if it's not a fullmoon. (darker night is more preferable for this method). A skilled driver and one or two skilled "spotlighers" are needed. (the spotlighter also as a "guide"). You know, not rare we found others animal when "searching" by the spotlights. In longer range, say more than 200meter at night...it is very difficult for "unskilled eyes" to "know what (game) is that?". Not rare we can only seen its eye(s)...even in brushy area. That's why i say "skilled".
Perhaps it was not your type of hunting method...?

2. "Stalking hunt" also another type. It can be a fullmoon condition or in a dark night. (also in the late afternoon). Here almost of us can walk in a dark night without any light, even we didn't know or familiar with the field. In a fullmoon night we can even find game's track (on the soil).
We then use the battery spotlight we carried if we feel there is/are wildboars overthere and shoot...! Sometimes i only use my scope, depends on the condition and if i'm sure "what is that".
European scopes like Zeiss, Scmid&Bender, or Swarovsky are favourite for hunting scopes here. (Leupold is favourite for target shooting because its second focal plane). A variable 3-12X magnification in heavy duplex reticle is fine. My Zeiss Diavari has adjustable luminated reticle, it was helpful in a quick aim and dark condition. (don't use fine duplex). I also make a lasersight system under my hunting's barrel (in front of the forearm) for a quick shot. The on/off button is right on the grip, easily to touch with my right thumb while aiming. But some wildboars was frightened with the laser's light!. I ussualy head shot, i could see the game's eyes become very "brightfully red" with my laser.
I also have a night vision device (russian made, gen 1+) that sometimes i used it when stalking or still nighthunting. Sometimes i hold the device with my left hand while my right hand hold the rifle and aiming and shot the game. The dot lasersight was helpful.
I guess a NV goggle will perform better.

3. It is similar thing when "Still hunt". It could be in a "treestand" or on the ground, depends on the field.
With a "skilled" ear, you can easily "detect" the game came from, especially if the wind "help"...
I have a "Bionic Ear" device i've sold last year (a big dish, speaker and a headphone), because it was too bulky and not efficient!. Now i only use what nature gaves me! :)

4. "Using Dogs", but i've never tried it. But i think that's a good one...
Just do not use a shotgun, even in a full choke...if you didn't want your dogs hurt or dead!

Okay, that's my "story"...
BTW, we're fans of bolt action here. 30.06, 8mm mauser and .308 were amongs the popular here. I shot .22lr, 223, 7x57, 7,62x39, .308, 30.06, 8x57. A little of 12 GA and .416rigby (but it was). I also shot "benchrest" and target paper/silhoutte, but due to "calibers selection" here, i'm a fan of 308.

Best Wishes,
Seb. (in Indonesia)
 

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experienced opinion

the big mail order companys sell optronics night blasters or blazers, something like that. Which are spotlights that mount right on your scope. They come in 100, 200, and 300 yard models . The new 300 is the smallest and handiest.

whether to use the red or white lens is determined by the amount of pressure the hogs you are going to be hunting have experienced. We have put a plain old white spotlight right on a hog at 40yds and they showed no sign of even noticing. We have also put a red lens spotlight on hard hunted hogs and they run off just as fast as when shot at. Try to set up in a relatively open area, because a lot of times when you hit them with the spotlight they will jump and run about 15 yds and then freeze. I assume they are trying to identify some dangerous scent or sound in connection with the light. If your bait is set up about 3o yds from the thick stuff they will still be in the open when they freeze, offering an easy shot. The trick is to stay calm and not just throw a shot at them when they first jump. simply follow with the light and wait for them to stop. If you shoot and miss before they stop you will definitely spook them, and if they dont stop they were pretty spooky anyway, but they may go off in the brush and come back later.

If you for some reason you think your hogs have had quite a bit of hunting pressure start with the red lens and follow the advice above, if your hogs are naive then go ahead and start with the white lens, it lights things up alot better.

If I can clarify any of this for you, or anyone else post your questions or e-mail me I'll do my best.

sincerely
SHB
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yeah, I was trying to get the little 100 yard unit, but no one had it in stock at the time. I ended up getting the house brand of the 250. Works great! I'm ready to try it out soon. I also picked up a red lens for my D-cell mag light. That actually puts off enough light to shoot out to 25 or 30 yards with either of my scopes.
 
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