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Just a few comments from a newcomer, to other newcomers.

1. Buy quality stuff. Low cost is often low quality. The Lee presses I have are fine as are the Lee dies. The Lee powder scale is not worth owning, nor is the Franklin Digital scale. Just ordered an RCBS 505. Get the good stuff first.
2. Listen to the "old timers". They will very rarely steer you wrong. (except for the gentleman who suggested that Kosher Bacon Fat is the best bullet lube)
3. If you're gonna cast your own bullets, get the 6 cavity mold for the sizes you shoot the most. Mathematically it should be three times more productive, but feels like it's a lot faster than even that.
4. You WILL spend more than you at first thought. It's an addiction.
5. Follow the load guidelines from the Powder companies. They really do know what they are doing.
6. Find somebody local who is into this and knows what they are doing. A little hands-on guidance is priceless.

alan
 

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I see it a little differently:
1) Buy good quality stuff, no exceptions. Good quality does not necessarily mean expensive.
2) Do not listen to old timers unless they are proven reliable. Too many old timers in reloading are using bad methods.
3) No comment, except to be careful when handling lead. Especially use good ventilation, preferably outdoors.
4) You will not spend more than you first thought if you carefully plan what you need and shop accordingly. If you do that, you will know know almost exactly what you will initially spend, and what you will spend for ongoing expenses.
5) The bullet companies have the best data because they are publishing loads based on the full and specific set of factory components used to make the loads. Those that use typical sporting arms for their testing are the best of the best. Also see response #2.
6) Do not seek advice from anyone until you have read and understood the best practices of reloading as documented in reliable loading manuals such as Speer and Hornady. See response #2. You need to know whether the "old pro" is worth listening to. Most are not.
 

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Tn_junk, it would appear that as a newcomer, you have a better handle on things than most. The only thing I would have issue with is the bacon fat. I ain't wasting that stuff to use as lube. I've still got some arteries that are too wide open. :D

As long as you keep in mind that this is not an exact science for most of us, you'll do fine. Be willing to take a little from ALL sources and make your own educated decisions.
 

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Questor said:
5) The bullet companies have the best data because they are publishing loads based on the full and specific set of factory components used to make the loads.
An this is different from the powder manufactures data how? AA powder, Alliant, Ramshot, Norma and Hodgdon(printed) all list a specific set of factory components, brass, bullet weight-type-brand, COL, primer and powder. Some of the powder manufactures even list pressure which many of the bullet manufactures do not.
 

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I too like the Lee products, except for the scale!
I also have spent more than I thought, but I've enjoyed it alot! ;D
Hard to plan when your first getting started.
 

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FWIW, I have the FA digital scale, and it works great, so long as I keep it out of the air conditioning vent's breeze (a must for any scale)! I use check weights religiously, just in case.

Andy
 
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