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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Double D,

Well its has a 20" deep tube, 1" bore and as far as the history of it I have no idea who made it or anything. Wish I did. I can tell you that it makes a nice kaboom and blows a smoke ring pretty high. It also looked amazing at night.

That's one of the reasons I haven't even fired a blank out of it till now. Someone who supposedly knows about such things took a look at it and said I could shoot ball out of it without any worries. Well I'm a worrier so I settled on blanks till someone really in the know takes a good look at it. I was concerned because of the casting marks that are still visible around the sides of it. The bore is nice and shiny without any seams or anything visible. If anyone knows more about and can tell by pics I'll be glad to take more of it.

Now I want a 1841 mountain howitzer! I hear they really rattle the windows. I guess if I sold my GTO I'd be able to afford one. :)

Billy
 

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casting marks
????

Cast, especially a casting of unknown material and unknown quality, should be treated as a "looker", not a "shooter".

On the other hand, if you have enough wall thinkness, you could bore it out and install a liner of good known grade steel and have a FINE SHOOTER!
 

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Medbill,
I enlarged the 3/4 veiw of your barrel. Does it appear to have a ring in the casting about 3/8" away from the edge of the bore? If it does it may already have a liner in it.
Most cannon barrels are and were cast.
 

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Medbill -

Welcome - thanks for posting your pictures!


TAKE NOTE EVERYONE, look and see the FIRE EXTINGUISHER. That's practicing good safety!


.
 

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Discussion Starter #8

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Have you checked to see if the barrel is made of steel? There was a cannon in a mall shoe shop here years ago that looked a lot like yours but the barrel was made of aluminum or zinc or something but it was not made to shoot.
 

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Billy,

Read everything on this forum that you can find on barrel liners, breach plugs and vent pieces then contact a machine shop that can handle the project and discuss with them what you are trying to accomplish, then get back on the forum and run your findings by the group. There are some very knowledgeable people here that can steer you in the right direction. The important thing is to fit the proper liner to the barrel, don't try to fit the barrel to a piece of tubing because it is handy or cheap.

Max
 

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Get your self a copy of this book and learn how to make and install a proper liner THE MORE COMPLETE CANNONEER By M.C. Switlik with selected excerpts from other artillery manuals

(Man, I need to get Switlik to give me a commission)
 

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Hi, my name is Kap,

I'd give the thing a magnet test, proof it with two balls, and a double charge. Isn't that standard practice?

I might also check the bore depth for metal thickness at the breach.

Check to see if the breach end of the bore is like a drill point, or spherical like it should be.

If it's a drill point, take care to get your hot embers out.

Hide behind a big tree, or stone wall.

Let her rip, or burst.

If that dosen't phase it, have fun.

If she blows, call Hern Iron. They have to make a living too.

I can't see the trouble and expense of lining it just to shoot blanks.

Kap
 

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kappullen said:
Hi, my name is Kap,
I'd give the thing a magnet test, proof it with two balls, and a double charge. Isn't that standard practice?
I might also check the bore depth for metal thickness at the breach.
Check to see if the breach end of the bore is like a drill point, or spherical like it should be.
If it's a drill point, take care to get your hot embers out.
Hide behind a big tree, or stone wall.
Let her rip, or burst.
If that dosen't phase it, have fun.
If she blows, call Hern Iron. They have to make a living too.
I can't see the trouble and expense of lining it just to shoot blanks.
Kap
Kap - WELCOME to the board!

You've said a mouthfull in your first post! If you can, put up some pictures of what you shoot - we'd love to see them.

Let me make a few comments from my experiences.

Proof testing is not a bad idea, and there are a number of ways doing it.

Checking metal thickness at breach and form of the end of the bore are fundamentally sound common sense things to do! The spherical end removes a sharp inside corner (stress riser) making the piece stronger. Hadn't heard any thing about sparks, but it sure doesn't hurt to be wary.

When it comes to lining & shooting blanks, there I have a much different opinion. Read the 'stickys' at the top of the forum. I have seen from 15' away an unlined bronze signal cannon (designed for salutes) explode. 1" bore about 18" long, professionally made. When you light the fuse you would really like to KNOW that it's a cannon and not a bomb.

Now that's done, we really do WELCOME you here! Toss ideas out & you will get several perspectives.

Keep it safe, legal, polite and fun!
 

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Sorry to butt in but "proof testing" has not been standard practice in engineering since about 1880-something.

The only "proof testing" that is allowed (in engineering) is testing one sample to destruction.

It was found that "proof testing" could (and often DID) cause material over-stress that left the item weaker than it was originally and led to eventual failure.

Please do not think "proof testing" has anything to do with safety - proof testing is a design or process verification and the item so tested should NEVER be used "in regular service"
 

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Calamity Jane said:
Sorry to butt in but "proof testing" has not been standard practice in engineering since about 1880-something.

The only "proof testing" that is allowed (in engineering) is testing one sample to destruction.

It was found that "proof testing" could (and often DID) cause material over-stress that left the item weaker than it was originally and led to eventual failure.

Please do not think "proof testing" has anything to do with safety - proof testing is a design or process verification and the item so tested should NEVER be used "in regular service"



WELL PUT, Very well explained.


Thanks for posting this explanation from a design perspective.
 

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It is my understanding that all modern firearms are test fired with at least one "proof" load in excess of standard maximum pressure. How much in excess I do not know, but presumably within a range that is not expected to cause permanent deformation in the absence of a defect.
 

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Calamity Jane said:
Sorry to butt in but "proof testing" has not been standard practice in engineering since about 1880-something.

The only "proof testing" that is allowed (in engineering) is testing one sample to destruction.

"
Hi Jane,

I work for NASA, and we proof test every thing that goes in space, as well as every lifting, holding fixture etc.

That's part of my job as a machinist to make tooling and fixtures for proof testing of one kind or other.

We shake em, pull em, push em, blast en, freez em, and bake em, to try to break em before they go up in the wild blue yonder.

Even a quarter inch flight bolt gets proof tested. You know some of those bolts don't break untill you load em up to over 1000 pounds.

Once in a while one gets by us!

I guess I'm behind the times.
I'll try to re-educate myself, sorry.

Kap
 

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GG: I know most new firearms are "proof tested" but such testing would be only slightly over the normal "maximum" load. I do not know what the actual figures are.

I DO know about boilers. A boiler is tested to 125% of its design pressure. Any pressure over 150% of design is cause to condem the boiler. Mechanically, from an engineering perspective, any item stressed beyond 80% of its designed "ultimate strength" is considered no longer useable.
 
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