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Floating around E-Bay I found the Mini Cut Off Saw by Harbor Freight for $24.99 plus S&H. Now being the type that is looking for a much better deal, I could not help but go to HarborFreight and find the very same item # 42307-3VGA for only $19.99 plus S&H 42307-3VGA

Now mind you, you only get the cut off saw when ordering and not the board and extra stuff you see here.

Disclaimer* GBO, Washington Hunter and The Montanan will not be held responsible for any injuries incurred during the process of building and or using your arrow saws. There is always a chance of getting hurt using something made at home. Build and use at your own risk.[/color]

Supplies:
1.) Mini Cut-Off Saw (Item# 42307 at Harbor Freight Tools)
2.) 40" piece of 1" x 6"
3.) 2 10" pieces of 1" x 6"
4.) 1 3 1/2" piece of 2" x 4"
5.)1 4" piece of 1" wooden dowel
6.) 10 Screws
7.) Permanent Marker
8.) Measuring Tape
9.) Electric Drill
10.) Table Saw, Band Saw, or Hand Saw
11.) Drill Press

The Process:

Step 1.) Lay the 40" piece of 1" x 6" out on a flat surface or work bench. This piece of wood will be used for the Arrow Saw's base.


Step 2.) Line the edge of the Mini Cut-Off Saw with the edge of your base.



Step 3.) There are two holes on the opposite side of the saw. Use two screws and screw the Mini Cut-Off Saw to your base.



Step 4.) From the clamp on your Mini Cut-Off Saw measure 31" out on the base of your new arrow saw. Use a pencil or pen to mark the spot at 31".



Step 5.) From your mark at 31" measure back towards your mini cut-off saw one inch shorter than the length of the shortest arrow you think you will be cutting. (I shoot a 28" arrow so I measured 4" back towards the mini cut-off saw.) Use your pen or pencil to mark these spots on your base.


Step 6.) With your table saw, band saw, or hand saw cut your 10" piece of 1" x 6" into four 1 1/2" pieces. (Cut them lengthwise)


Step 7.) Place the four pieces you just cut along the edges of your base and screw them to the base.


Step 8.) Using your previous marks as reference points, extend them over the pieces you just screwed to the base and write what eash mark stands for.


Step 9.) Using your drill press, drill a hole in the back of your piece of 2" x 4" deep enough that your wooden dowel fits into it snug. After this is drilled out, drill a smaller hole straight through for a screw to fit into. (This hole is also the hole your arrow will fit into when you go to cut it so make sure it's lined up with the clamps on your mini cut-off saw.) Screw the dowel into the hole. This piece should fit snug in between the pieces you screwed into the base.


Step 10.) Enjoy your new arrow saw.


This is mine will look like all set up:


Pictures taken by Washington Hunter of his set up.
 

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I was sick and tired of the local shop always getting lengths wrong. If I wanted 26-5/8", thats what I wanted not +/- 1/8" to 1/4". I bought a Weston 5000rpm arrow cutter some time ago for $89 and now all my arrows are exactly the same length.

It is quite handy to have. All my mates now buy arrows and cut them on my machine.
 

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The correct way to measure arrow length is from the front of the nock index (throat which touches the bowstring)...not the end of the nock. (Unfortunately nocks are NOT standardized throughout the industry..) to the insert at the business end.

You can find Apple 7,000 rpm arrow cut off set ups for about $69. I am a professional arrow maker and I would recommend 9,000 rpm for the newer carbon/kevlar shafts... My 12,000 rpm Easton machine is no longer made due to lawsuits...I believe the new eastons max at about 9,000 rpm also.

Building arrows is a great hobbie/business! Have Fun!
 

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I don't make my own shafts, and don't really recommend this way for making them, but.

I had an arrow break off close to the tip, and so it went in the "long range practice" pile. I took a dremel took with the stone grinder bit, and it worked like a charm! Didn't leave any burns or anything, and this was a carbon shaft.

So when in a pinch....
 
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