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Ive had my Marlin 25N for at least 25 years. Ive put at minimum several thousands of rounds through her and Ive never cleaned the barrel because its always been dead on perfect each and every time through the years. Then a few months ago we had company over to the house and I set it in a different corner out of the way, and I dont know if it got knocked over or if it fell over on its own, and afterwards I didnt know it but apparently when it fell over it jarred the lead build up inside the rifling and later I realized it was starting to shooting erratic. After eliminating my first suspicion of the scope I knew something else was wrong. Anyway I had to clean the bore and of course there was a lot of lead build up but I got her whistle clean but now it doesnt group at all like she use to. I was reluctantly thinking about taking the time to shoot many more rounds to see if my groups might tighten back up ???, and Im not sure if there is a good answer to my question here, or if anyone has had a similar experience, but considering that Ive shot so many rounds through this rifle in years past, then is it possible that the rifling is wore out, and it might not be worth my time or trouble ?
 

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Im going to possibly clean the bore again, remove and clean the action, shoot several rounds, and give it another try.
Thanks
 

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Never heard of a bore getting messed up from a hard landing.



How did you determine that the scope was ok? That would be the first thing I'd sort out. take that scope off and replace it or try it with the sights if it is equipped with them. Keep it simple, shoot it from the bench or rest at 25 yards will be adequate. a 1" or better group at 25 yds will tell you it's not the barrel.



Is the action solid in the stock when the screws are snug? Don't over tighten them, just snug with a screwdriver. Once snug grasp the barrel with one hand and hold the stock securely on a bench with the other and make sure there is no play or movement with the action in the stock.


I can see it maybe taking some time to settle down after removal and some rounds fired thru a clean barrel, but ti should do so within 50 rounds max.
 

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Never heard of a bore getting messed up from a hard landing. Nor have I, and I didnt intend on making it sound like that was the case.



How did you determine that the scope was ok? I had it sent off to Nikon, only to have it returned being deemed as within specs. That would be the first thing I'd sort out. take that scope off and replace it or try it with the sights if it is equipped with them. Keep it simple, shoot it from the bench or rest at 25 yards will be adequate. a 1" or better group at 25 yds will tell you it's not the barrel.



Is the action solid in the stock when the screws are snug? Yes sir, as I have a torque wrench specifically for this task. Don't over tighten them, just snug with a screwdriver. Once snug grasp the barrel with one hand and hold the stock securely on a bench with the other and make sure there is no play or movement with the action in the stock.


I can see it maybe taking some time to settle down after removal and some rounds fired thru a clean barrel, but ti should do so within 50 rounds max. I really do hope so.
Thanks for the help. My biggest concern was that the rifling might have been worn out in certain areas, and might not be worth the time or trouble after all these years, and passing so many many rounds.
 

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Hi Piney River! We seem to have the same model rifle, from about the same time frame.

I cleaned mine religiously, no more than two to four rounds playing with the groundhogs on a given outing, and it was rendered squeaky clean upon reaching home. There ends the differences, and begins the similar problems.

I noticed the rifle would change POI at the beginning of a new season, and often rather than put three shots into 3/4" @ 100yds, it would open the groups up signifigantly. The problem was fairly easily solved over the first few years by retorquing the action screw and rezeroing. 30calflash was really on with it.

I decided that since the POI was also moving, in addition to the grouping opening up, the stock had to have something to do with it. I keep Brownells Accra Glas on hand in the gun room, so I decided to rebed the barrel and action area using a thicker than usual bed of Accra Glas. That was about 10 years ago, and I haven't had to touch the rifle since.

Hope that helps you out, I figure when it fell over, it jarred the action in the stock for the first time ever, and broke the "perfect" bedding from the action.
 

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Thanks for the help. My biggest concern was that the rifling might have been worn out in certain areas, and might not be worth the time or trouble after all these years, and passing so many many rounds.
Somehow, I don't see lead boolits wearing out the rifling in a rimfire. If the lead has built up as you say, shouldn't that have protected the rifling from shooting damage also? Lubed it if you would.


I have heard of some guns that shoot better after being fouled and bad right after a cleaning. Maybe shoot a few boxes of ammo without cleaning and see if it tightens up.


Or it could be the other reason mentioned, scope, loose stock etc. Or could you be using different ammo?


Rosewood
 

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Hi Piney River! We seem to have the same model rifle, from about the same time frame.

I cleaned mine religiously, no more than two to four rounds playing with the groundhogs on a given outing, and it was rendered squeaky clean upon reaching home. There ends the differences, and begins the similar problems.

I noticed the rifle would change POI at the beginning of a new season, and often rather than put three shots into 3/4" @ 100yds, it would open the groups up signifigantly. The problem was fairly easily solved over the first few years by retorquing the action screw and rezeroing. 30calflash was really on with it.

I decided that since the POI was also moving, in addition to the grouping opening up, the stock had to have something to do with it. I keep Brownells Accra Glas on hand in the gun room, so I decided to rebed the barrel and action area using a thicker than usual bed of Accra Glas. That was about 10 years ago, and I haven't had to touch the rifle since.

Hope that helps you out, I figure when it fell over, it jarred the action in the stock for the first time ever, and broke the "perfect" bedding from the action.
Thanks much for that info. I will consider your suggestion if my groups dont tighten.


Somehow, I don't see lead boolits wearing out the rifling in a rimfire. If the lead has built up as you say, shouldn't that have protected the rifling from shooting damage also? Lubed it if you would.


I have heard of some guns that shoot better after being fouled and bad right after a cleaning. Maybe shoot a few boxes of ammo without cleaning and see if it tightens up.


Or it could be the other reason mentioned, scope, loose stock etc. Or could you be using different ammo?


Rosewood
Scope and stock are good, as well as the same ammo. I wouldnt think it would wear out the rifling in certain parts, but then again Ive never had a 22 rifle for this many years, and with this many rounds down the barrel. Im going to have to take the time to bolt action about 50 to 100 rounds to see if I notice a difference. Thanks
 

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I received my Marlin model 60 in about 1987 or 88. I have put thousands of rounds down the pipe. Never seen any diminish in accuracy in it. Probably only run a bore snake down it every few years, never a deep cleaning either.


Lead is a whole lot softer than the barrel steel and rimfire bullets are all most 100% lead or plated which is as soft as lead for all practical purposes. Unless you have some really hot loads causing throat erosion, which I have never heard of in a rimfire, I doubt you rifling is wore.



Now if someone routinely dropped the rounds in the dirt then fired them without wiping off, then you could for sure wear out the barrel.


Good luck and keep us posted.


Rosewood
 

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I received my Marlin model 60 in about 1987 or 88. I have put thousands of rounds down the pipe. Never seen any diminish in accuracy in it. Probably only run a bore snake down it every few years, never a deep cleaning either.


Lead is a whole lot softer than the barrel steel and rimfire bullets are all most 100% lead or plated which is as soft as lead for all practical purposes. Unless you have some really hot loads causing throat erosion, which I have never heard of in a rimfire, I doubt you rifling is wore.



Now if someone routinely dropped the rounds in the dirt then fired them without wiping off, then you could for sure wear out the barrel.


Good luck and keep us posted.


Rosewood
Sounds like promising news as Ive never shot hot loads, or dirty ones either.
Thanks


You didn't get a ding in the crown of the barrel somehow? Even a small burr at the crown will throw accuracy off.
No sir, absolutely not. Thanks just the same.
 
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