Graybeard Outdoors banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
723 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is an account of an engagement between Texas Rangers of Company "D", Frontier Battalion, and an Indian raiding party in Menard County, Texas in 1874. Company "D" commander was Captain Cicero Rufus (Old Rufe) Perry, whose service to Texas started when he was 13, and was a courier for Gen. Sam Houston at the Battle of San Jacinto. Lieutenant Roberts, was Daniel W. Roberts, who eventually commanded Company "D" as a Lieutenant, and ultimately as a Capitan. Scott Cooley was soon to become the target of his old Ranger buddies when he became the primary blood letter in the Mason County War. As you can see from this account, brutality wasn't strictly an Indian trait.




Austin Daily Democratic Statesman
Saturday, November 28, 1874

"Another Ranger-Indian Fight.-Five Indians Killed and one Captured.

"On Saturday morning last, a portion of Major Jones's escort and a detachment of Capt. Perry's company, encamped on Elm crock in Menard county, and about one hundred and sixty miles west of this city, encountered a party of nine Indians, with the above result. The Indians came down Elm within a few miles of camp, and, running in on a beef detail of two men, Scott Cooley and Billy Trawic, opened fire upon them, when they fled to camp in hot haste, pursued by the Indians, who fired several shots, Cooley returning the fire. The Indians were immediately pursued. and overtaken after a gallop of about twelve miles, when a running fight took place, the Indians being at a disadvantage because of the superior numbers of the rangers. The Indians would occasionally halt to make a standing fight, but the showering bullets would soon put them to flight at break-neck speed, rough, rocky places having no terrors for them. Five Indians were killed and one captured, together with their horses, arms, bows and arrows, shields, etc. The captured Indian, a Comanche, was brought to the city yesterday by a detail of five or six rangers, and as he passed up the Avenue in wild Indian costume, strapped to a mule, all eyes were turned to him, and large crowds of people followed him to the Capitol grounds, where the red warrior was gazed upon by hundreds of curious eyes. The captured Indian ran about two miles after his horse was shot from under him, but seeing he would be caught, he turned back to the men, fell upon his knees and, throwing up his hands. shouted 'bueno amigo',which is'me good friend.' The Indian, who is now in jail, will, we understand, be sent back to camp, and perhaps then tried by a court martial. If so, we wouldn't give much for his chance. The boys brought some fresh scalps with them, and they report that Scott Cooley, who was fired at and run into camp, not only cut a wounded Indian's throat, but stripped a large piece of skin from his back, saying that he would make a quirt out of it.

"The following is the official report of Major John B. Jones regarding the fight: "HEADQUARTERS FRONTIER BATTALION, }
"AUSTIN, TEXAS, November 24,1874 }
"Gen. W. Steele, Adjutant General
"Sir-I have the honor to report that on the twenty-first instant, Lieut. Roberts, with a detachment from Capt. Perry's company, and Lieut. Beavert, with a detachment from my escort, came upon a party of nine Indians in the southern part of Menard county, having followed their trail for several miles, going in the direction of Mason. They immediately gave the Indians chase, and in a running fight of several miles, killed five and captured one, together with their horses, arms, and equipments. Three of Lieut. Robert's horses being wounded and all of them broken down, he was forced to abandon the chase, but at last accounts, Lieut. Beavert, with a few men well mounted were in close pursuit of the other three, with fair prospects of coming up with them, as they had an open country to run over.
"None were killed or wounded on our side.
"The Indians were Comanches.
"The prisoner will arrive in this city to-morrow to be disposed of as the Governor may direct.

"JOHN B. JONES, "Major Commanding Frontier Battalion."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
723 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
OldWest wasn't exactly like you saw at Satu

Speaking of young, my great grandfather (James G. Odiorne) was 17 when he joined Company "B", Frontier Forces (commanded by my alias namesake, Captain A.H. (Hamp) Cox), in 1870. He died before I was born, but my mom and uncles said he had some interesting stories to tell. One was about when a 12-man detachment of his company was sent out to pursue a raiding party of Cammanche, 35-40 strong. They caught up with them in Palo Pinto County, and the fight got pretty serious for a while. My James was going one on one with one of the raiders when his (James') .44 Winchester jammed (guessing it was a '66). Fortunately for James (and for me - I wouldn't be here otherwise) he got the Winchester functioning in time to take the fight out of his adversary (permanently). In this engagement ten of the raiders were killed, forty stolen horses were recoverd, and five of the Rangers were wounded. The Governor Of Texas recognized this Ranger success in General Orders No. 8, May 11, 1871, published by his Adjutant General.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
723 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
OldWest wasn't exactly like you saw at Satu

The Texas Rangers evolved from an unpaid group of 14 men and one sergeant organized by Baron de Bastrop in 1823 to protect the settlers of Stephen F. Austin's initial colony from the depredations of Karankawa Indians. Later in 1823, Austin, at his own expense, organized a paid 10-man "Ranging Company", individual members of which were called "Rangers". Subsequent Texas Ranger organizations were always organized along military lines and functioned as units/detachments pretty much until the Indian threat and Mexican border problems were resolved. The "One Riot One Ranger" bit didn't become prevalent until the 1890s or so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
470 Posts
OldWest wasn't exactly like you saw at Satu

So they actually did work that way at some point. I guess hollywood had to get it from somewhere.

You know, it's funny on tv. I was watching one of the old Gunsmokes the other day and they had a prizefight using the "modern" rules (no hitting below the belt, etc.). I never really knew when Gunsmoke was supposed to take place but my guess would be the early 1870s, being a cowtown and all. I'm thinking those rules in boxing came in to being in the 90s or after the turn of the century. So it's not just civil war troops carrying 92s and SAAs. They also have some of societies rules in the wrong period too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,405 Posts
OldWest wasn't exactly like you saw at Satu

the one riot-one ranger thing has several begennings, depending on who you read--i guess its like its been said before--nothing is original to an author of any saying. nothing new under the sun--only things forgotton.
blessings
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top