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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Cheers,

I just recieved an order from Dixie Gun Works of these wads.

Has anyone out there with a long barrel (30") ever used them?

The copy that comes with them says that they are "pre-lubed" and are to be placed directly on the powder - no cardboard wad underneath.

I've always lubed my felt wads with the same lube that I use on the bullet and always put a cardboard wad underneath the lubed wad.

I was getting "key-hole" punches in the paper and when I asked C. Sharps, their answer was that I was running out of lubrication at the end of my barrel. They told me to do what I'm doing now - so I'm a little confused as to which method is best with these wads.

Thanks,

cr
 

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I've never much cared for Wonder Wads, as-is. I always soak mine in more lubricant.
I've used Wonder Wads for 20 years or so. I've always found their dry lubricant to be lacking, even in cap and ball revolvers with their comparatively short barrel.
I use a very old lubricant recipe, perhaps dating to the late 19th century, and soak my wads in that:
1 part paraffin (canning paraffin, sold in the cooking aisle)
1 part mutton tallow (sold by Dixie Gun Works)
1/2 part beeswax
All amounts are by weight, not volume.
With a kitchen scale I weigh 200/200/100 grams of ingredients, which will almost fill a quart Mason jar.
Place the jar with ingredients into three or four inches of boiling water. When ingredients are melted, stir together with clean stick or disposable chopstick. Allow to harden at room temperature; hastening cooling by placing in the refrigerator may cause the ingedients to separate.
When cool, tighten the lid on the to keep dust out and natural moistures in and store in a cool, dry place.
I put a couple Tablespoons of the lubricant into a clean tuna or cat food can, then place it on the stove at the absolutely lowest setting. You need only to melt the lubricant. When fully melted add the Wonder Wads and stir them until well-saturated, using the same stick or chopstick.
I don't squeeze out the excess lubricant; just allow the wads to cool and use as-is.
Some shooters will be aghast, no doubt, at the inclusion of paraffin in this recipe because it's a petroleum product.
Petroleum products typically leave a hard, tarry fouling that is hard to remove, when used with black powder.
Not so, paraffin. A chemist type on another site explained that canning paraffin lacks the hydrocarbons that other petroleum products have. Apparently, hydrocarbons are the culprit in the fouling mess.
Anyway, I can say that I've used the above lubricant with lead bullets in cartridges, as a patch lubricant for my .50-caliber muzzleloading rifle, with conical lead bullets in cap and ball revolvers, and as a felt wad lubricant.
Not once have I encountered the hard, tarry fouling typical of other petroleum products.
I believe the paraffin is actually quite beneficial. It stiffens the felt wad considerably, which helps it scrape out fouling. Recovered wads show a mirror-image of the rifling, around their edges.
This recipe creates a lubricant nearly identical to the commercially available black powder cartridge bullet lubricants. In fact, to the untrained eye it can be difficult to tell the difference.
I use these lubricant-augmented wads in my .45-70 Trapdoor carbine and reproduction 1873 Winchester .44-40 with 24-inch barrrel, as well as my .36 and .44 cap and ball revolvers.
All guns shoot very clean when these wads are used with Goex FFFG or FFG black powder.
I've never had to place a vegetable fiber wad below the wad. I've used a vegetable fiber below the bullet at times, but could never see a difference.
On especially hot days, I'll place a waxed-paper wad (cut from a pint of milk or similar carton) between the powder and wad or bullet, to keep the lubricant from contaminating the powder.
I don't know if I really need to use this waxed paper wad but it certainly doesn't hurt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
paraffin

:grin: Cheers Montanan,

Not wanting to start a fight, but is the paraffin thing documented or another "tail of an old wife" - I've fallen for so many of them that I can NEAVER tell if what I'm told is one or not.

What's your lube, if you don't mind - and why? I'm still in the "store bought" stage so any info will be helpful.

Also, do you resize the brass for every re-loading, or just do the belling of the throat?

While I'm being "dumb" - how oversize of a bullet do you shoot or do you size the bullets every time? My mold is a .460 and I can't tell any difference if I down size to .457 or not. 'Course, this could be OFU - ie, bad shooter.

I/we were so bad Sunday that I seriously considered welding a bayonette on the end and just stabbing the targets!

Gentle winds,
cr
 

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crashresidue how you doing this fine day.

I have always maintained beeswax and it's use. Here is what I use.

(For bullets with lube grooves)
8 oz beeswax
4 oz coconut oil bar
4 oz neetsfoot oil (not compound) some will use Virgin Olive Oil

(For paper patch bullets and grease cookies)
8 oz of beeswax
8 oz of neetsfoot oil

The reason that I use it - it works, and carries the moisture that is needed for keeping the fouling soft.

Easy to mix.

Pan #1 filled about 1/4 to a 1/3. Pan #2 is placed over (helps if Pan #2 is slightly smaller to fit into Pan #1) bring water to boil. Place broken up 8 oz. of beeswax into pan and let melt. Add your 4 oz. coconut oil bar and let melt then add 4 oz. of neetsfoot oil and stir until mixed and clear.

I then have already prepped a 9"x9" cooking cake pan lined with cylo wrap and pour my liquid lube into the pan. Let stand till crust if forming on top and then place into fridge to let get firm.

Grease groove bullets are then pan lubed as needed. Hope this helps.
 

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I have been shooting the big cartridge black powder rifles for a while now. I think during the first year I tried to use wonder wads and even some lube with parifin in it. Neither work worth a darn. I think the old lube receipt you quoted was for SMOKLESS POWDER. I know of no referance for parifin in any black powder lube.

I suggest you concentrate on the correct bullet design that will carry enough lube. If you can not accomplish this, then and only then, you might try grease cookies behind the bullet, however, these are not the best solution in cartridges such as the 40-65 or 45-70, because it reduces powder capacity too much. There are a lot of books out there on this stuff. You need to do some research. If you live in an area where they shot BPRC at clubs or shots, go to these and ask questions. Perhaps you can find a metor or coach to help you with load development. Good Luck to ya, and keep makin' smoke.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
wads

Cheers Gentlemen,

Thanks for the formula - I need ALL the help I can get!

Now, a new question - I'm trying to standardise everthing I can, and the first thing that popped into my twisted mind was- "brass - all the same length". So, I started checking my brass for length and got some that were "long" - I can trim those, and I got a bunch that were short. I shoot a 45-2 7/8 - in decimal thats 2.875.

Well, I just arbitrairly(sp?) set the lower limit at 2.860 for a short length. Well, much to my dismay, of the "short" ones - I got 5 Bell's that have only been shot twice and never trimmed. I only have 20 Bell brass - so I'm looking at a "failure" rate of 25% in case length on this brand.

Anybody else out there had problems with Bell brass being non-uniform?

This evening - it's raining on Maui! What a grand sound! Had a beautiful day - gust winds but bright blue skies. Ya'al gotta' come here at least ONCE in you life!

Gentle winds,
cr
 

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Montana, I think that is probably a pretty good lube you are using, however I think I have an even better one. I use it on both grooved and paper patched bullets.

4 oz natural beeswax
4 oz natural almond oil
1 oz pure lanolin

the reason I use almond oil is that it is THE oil rated for high temperature cooking, (such as in a very hot chineese wok over a hot gas fire). It will not catch fire like crisco, canola oil, or any other veg. oil, until well past their flamable (inflamable) temp.

It is rated as the highest temp cooking oil there is. Has no appreciable odor, and is not much more expensive.

It gives good lubrication with both types of bullets. I use it as a grease cookie (1/8") for PP bullets and when melted in a double boiler I pour it into my lube sizer and it works better than anything else I have tried including SPG.

Neatsfoot oil works great on leather, that is if you want an oil saturated leather that will pick up every bit of dirt and dust that there is around. I have not tried it for bullets, and don't know how it handles high temps, but I don't think it would be an improvement on the almond oil, lanolin and beeswax formula that I am using.

I don't know of anyone else using this formula and I am not a national champ at anything, so you can take this for what it is worth.

The thing is, IT WORKS VERY WELL. :D OMAHA
 
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