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I don't remember who it was but on the old board someone asked about persimmon recipes. I found this one in one of my cookbooks.
Persimmon Pudding

Mix together a cup of sieved persimmon pulp, a cup of sugar, and 2 teaspoons of baking soda. Then stir in a cup of sifted flour, 1/2 cup sliced walnuts, 1/2 cup seedless raisins, 1/2 cup milk, 2 teaspoons melted butter,
1 teaspoon vanilla extract, 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon, 1/2 teaspoon ginger, and 1/8 teaspoon salt. Pour into a greased baking dish and bake in a preheated moderate 350 degress oven for an hour.
 

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Thank You!!

Thank you for the persimmon recipe. I'll try it and let you know how it turns out. Just wanna' make sure. It is baking SODA and not baking POWDER that's called for... Thanks again..
 

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Re: Thank you

Frog123,

It is baking soda.

I found this up above the recipe and thought I would share it with you.

Persimmons, sweetened by frost, were among the lifesaving edibles shown to the starving English settlers their first winter in Virginia by Indian neighbors who'd long mashed this agreeable fruit for cakes and puddings.

The cookbook is called "Gourmet Cooking for Free"
 

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WB

Here is what I found in my tree book. I hope it helps.

Common Persimmon- This tree is primarily a southern species but does occur as far north as southern New York and Connecticut. It is commonly seen growing along roadsides, fence rows, edges of fields, and on rocky hillsides. The best growth and largest persimmon trees are found in the Mississippi River Valley in rich bottomlands. The trees do not occur along the main range of the Appalachian Mountains. They grow in disturbed areas and in deciduous woodlands along with sycamore, red maple, sugar maple, cedar elm, yellow poplar, and several of the oaks and hickories.

These are slow-growing trees that produce small, but attractive bell-shaped flowers in spring. The large fleshy fruits mature by the end of the growing season. Persimmon fruits are a valuable food source to wildlife including whitetail deer, raccoons, foxes, skunks, many birds, and small rodents. People gather and eat the fruits after the skin has wrinkled and the pulp has become mushy, usually after the first frost. Otherwise, the fruit is so bitter that it causes a person's lips to pucker.

The dark-brown wood is very strong, very hard, and heavy. But it is not used commercially because it yields and inferior grade of lumber.

We have the book "****, I Was There" by Elmer Keith but I haven't read it just. I have a feel that I will enjoy this book.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Another Persimmon Recipe

Frog123,

Here is another recipe for you.

Persimmon Bread

2 cups all-purpose flour
1 cup sugar
2 eggs, beaten
1/2 cup nuts (pecans or walnuts)
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 1/2 sticks of margarine
1 cup persimmon pulp

Cream sugar and margarine. Add eggs, flour, baking soda, nuts and pulp.
Mix well. Line loaf pan with waxed paper. Pour mixture into pan. Bake 1 hour at 350 degress.
 

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WB,
You are welcome. I hope to get started on the book soon and when I finished it I will be sure to let you know how I liked it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
A Persimmon Cake Recipe

Cherokee Persimmon Cake

1 cup persimmon pulp
1/2 cup sugar
1 egg
butter (about the size of a walnut)
1 cup flour
1 teaspoon of baking powder
1/2 teaspoon of baking soda

Combine and mix all ingredients well. Pour into a greased and floured cake pan. Bake at 350 degress for approzimately 40 minutes.
 

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Persimmon Cookies
Gather wild Persimmons after 1st Frost.........
Yield: about 2 cups of pulp per gallon of persimmons.

Ingredients:
2cups - flour 1 cup - sugar
1/2 tsp - nutmeg 1 cup - butter
1/2 tsp - cinnamon 1 cup - persimmon pulp
1/2 tsp - cloves 1 - whole egg
1/4 tsp - salt 1 cup - raisins (ground)
1 tsp - baking soda 1 cup - pecans (chopped)

Sift Flour. Cream Sugar and Butter. Add egg to creamed mixture. Dissolve Soda in Pulp. Add spices to creamed mixture. Add Flour and Pulp alternately to creamed mixture.
Blend Well. Add raisins and nuts.
Drop by tsp full on greased cookie sheet and bake at 350 degrees until brown.
Mmmmmm Good !
 

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YEA ! ! ! Thanks everybody ! eddiegjr
 

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blacklab said:
How do you get the pulp? Press the persimmons. What about the seeds?
blacklab; you use a 'Chinois Sieve' usually comes with a large wooden 'Pestle' to mash the fruit with. Place the Chinois over a large bowl. Rinse off the fruit and drop them whole into the Chinois and mash them against the sides of the Chinois as you work the pestle around inside the snow cone shaped Chinois. The Pulp oozes out into the bowl leaving the skin and seed inside the Chinois. ;D
p.s. I corrected the misnomer name 'Colander' to 'Chinois'. Below is a picture of the Chinois and Pestle.
 

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Oooops !
Please refer to my edited post above. It ain't a colander it's a chinois. Never heard it called a chinois before, but that's what it is..... :eek: ;D ;D

4B
 

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There is a very wide price range in these things. Your local hardware store may have them for as low as $20[/color], but I've also seen them at the extreme price of over $100[/color].
 

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From my experience with a "chinois" I think it would be more effective and efficent to squeez the seeds out by hand before you ram the pulp through the chinois. The chinois would get the skins out. The big old persimmon seeds might cause the loss of a lot of pulp. Dont know for sure as I have only used a chinois to seperate small seeds or tough skins. eddiegjr
 

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Hi eddie:
I've never thought of squeezing out the seeds. The yield of pulp shown in my previous post is straight from the chinois. I don't know if I could convince my wife to squeeze 'em out anyway . ;D ;D
 

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FAYE. I just yesterday finished Elmers book, **** I was there, I thoroughly enjoyed it. Never heard of a chinois, collander is what we always called it. POWDERMAN. ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D
 

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I brew a tea from the seeds and left over pulp bound to the seeds. No set recipe. If you brew it too long it will get a somewhat bitter taste. It can be filtered through strainers and coffee filters, but it is labor intensive. It helps to just let the solids settle out and ladle off the golden tea on top of that. I add artificial sweetner myself, but have made it for others using sugar. Seemed a shame to let the seeds go to waste..........Mike
 

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easy persimmon seed extraction
« on: September 25, 2010, 05:24:20 AM »QuoteIf you've got a sausage stuffer with a lard basket, all the pulp will squirt out through the holes and leave the seeds behind. Sure beats a collander or strainer.
 

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persimmon tree is the only american tree that is a species of the ebony family.
 
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