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Discussion Starter #1
Considering one of the above in .36 opinions etc... much appreciated
I already have a Remington NMA 1858 in .44 love it.
Is this wedge system both employ troublesome?
 

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Pietta Navy sheriff or Pietta New York Met

No more or less than any other Colt type. Believe these two are full sized (1861 Navy sized) guns with shorter barrels rather than the "real" 5-shot versions....not 100% sure, but if you are expecting one of the small 5-shot (built on the .31 frame) guns, you might be dissapointed.

If you love the Rem. 58 .44...how about the .36 Navy version? Basically the same gun as the Rem. 58, just with smaller holes. Believe the Pietta version does carry a shorter barrel than the .44...6 1/2"?
 

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Pietta Navy sheriff or Pietta New York Met

As long as it is made pretty close to being rite, you won't have any more trouble than chosing new nipples and the rite caps. The colt design with the wedge seems week, but you got to remember that it has a nearly 1/2" thick arbor and if everything is fitting rite it more than securly locks the bare to the frame.

Personaly I like the colt design better, fits my hands better, and most are natural pointers. I can't hit squat with a Remington, but I don't need the sights much on a colt, which is a good thing because they don't have much in the way of sights!
 

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Pietta Navy sheriff or Pietta New York Met

John, the wedge is actually an advantage as it allows you to adjust the cylinder gap if needed. The wedge and arbor are very robust. Forget the nonsense you've maybe heard about Colts shooting loose. I have 30+ years old Colts that have fired thousand of rounds and are as tight as when new. There are 140 years old Colts out there still in firable condition, surely a testament to the basic soundness of the design. And these guns are justifiably renowned for their elegance and fine balance.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Pietta Navy sheriff or Pietta New York Met

Yes, I can see that now regarding the wedge, also backstrap not needed as massive arbor. OK Remies have back strap to provide strength, but cylinder rotates on slim bar - cylinder pin - MMMMMMM..
Local dealer has a .36 Navy Sheriff (Pietta) - part brass frame though would prefer all steel, however as NEW - cylinder no usual marks whatsoever for 70 pounds new UK price 144 giving this serious thought. I have to say it comes to point of aim superbly, like an extension of my arm. I take it this is a historically correct copy you fellas I guess should know??
 

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Pietta Navy sheriff or Pietta New York Met

Believe the Pietta'sare made with 6 1/2" barrels, which is a bit shorter than orginals (the originals I've seen are 7 1/2"...just 1/2" shorter than the .44versions). The brass trigger guard is normal, that's how most of the originals were made (maybe all of them...the ones wehre I couldn't tell had been plated at some time). Belive there are some small dimentional differences...but other than the barrel length it's a pretty close copy.

Except for the size of the holes in the barrel and cylinder, it's the same as their .44 version.

Sights are differnt....at least the older versions of the Uberti .36 used a dovetailed front sight. Same shape as the Pietta version (both are the same shape as the originals) but the Pietta version is staked to the barrel and non-moving. Not sure if all the Uberti's have the dovetail front or if all the originals did...were several model varitaions and I'm not up on the changes each one entailed. In any event, have run across more than a few originals that had their barrels bobbed back at least once in their long history, so a 1" short version wouldn't be out of place.

IF you like Remingtons and they point well for you, then consider the .36 Rem. repro. I've been a .36 fan for a lot of years, figuring as I'm NOT using these guns on people but on paper and plinking targets, the small ball isn't much of a penalty.
 
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