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Boge

Everything I have read says it is a very good copy of a fragile design. I have also read that, due to better metallurgy, it is stronger and more reliable than the original. Realize that the original was the third most common Union Army handgun purchace during the Civil War, after the Colt and the Remington. A lot of them were used in the original configuration.

It is a unique design, with a top strap that comes off to break the pistol down.

Having said all of that, I am sure that it also applies to my LeMat, and I love it!
 

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Ol' Clint used one in Unforgiven, but I believe he had the DA version, which was original...the SA version was made up at the request of the Army, since they probably were afraid that the average soldier would screw up with such an unfamiliar concept as DA.
 

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Starr

Charlie, if you ever pulled the trigger on a 19th century double action, you'd know why the Army preferred single action. They were delicate, as were the early Colt DA's, like the Lightning, and needed some strong fingers to operate. Turning all that mechanism on a black powder fouled gun was probably even worse, and more prone to bend or break internal parts. By the time the Army bought double action revolvers in 45ACP 1917, the Colt and Smith&Wesson had vastly improved their mechanisms.
 

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Boge,
I purchased a Starr SA made by Pietta several months ago from Cabelas in Owatonna MN. I have only fired it on one occasion, thus far. I had trouble with cocking the hammer on it. I don't know if it is characteristic of the piece or it just needs to be "worn in". I have cocked it repeatedly in front of the tv,and it seems to be getting better. I 've read that they need to be cocked briskly,since. The front sight was too thin for my liking,so I have replaced it with a thicker,taller one from "Track of the Wolf". the rear sight is a very thin shallow notch on the hammer, which I have opened up with my Dremel tool to allow me to at least see the sights. As I recall, it was shooting high, but centered.
This revolver points well and is a joy to shoot, barring the sticky hammer problem. It does not have a cylinder pin that goes clear thru the cylinder, so fouling was not an issue with it,asI merely put a little Ballistol on the front and rear of the cylinder. The large thumbscrew on the rear of the frame is a very handy dismounting feature also. I'm looking forward to shooting it some more in the spring when I get healed up from carpal tunnel syndrome surgery. Hope this helped.
J. D. Higgins
 

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Re: Starr

Flint said:
Charlie, if you ever pulled the trigger on a 19th century double action, you'd know why the Army preferred single action. They were delicate, as were the early Colt DA's, like the Lightning, and needed some strong fingers to operate. Turning all that mechanism on a black powder fouled gun was probably even worse, and more prone to bend or break internal parts. By the time the Army bought double action revolvers in 45ACP 1917, the Colt and Smith&Wesson had vastly improved their mechanisms.
I 'spect you're right...I've always had a problem with modern double actions...I've got smallish hands, and that long, 100-lb. trigger pull just defeats me. I'm lucky if they go downrange instead of some dangerous direction. I never thought of the BP-fouled gun. I bet it's what Newt's Mom called Hilary.
 

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When I started shooting NMLRA revolver matches some 50 years ago, I used an original STARR SA ( 1863 ) for several years. When the replicas came on the market I purchased a pair to shoot in CAS. All of the Pietta STARRS I've seen so far do need some work to make them work well. My two will have to have new bolts. Havent had time yet, but when I can re-work them, I think they'll a lot of fun. They have to be the uglist revolver ever made, and should be good for a few "style" points!
My normal match guns are Roders & Spencers, which are the most trouble free of any. They never give trouble over a three day match.

Cheers, Old Scout
 
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