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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We've tried who knows how many different recipes both simple and quick and those that have to be made up days ahead of time. We've tried premade boxed, bagged and canned crusts until we don't have any more options that we are aware of. If you have a recipe or know of a ready made crust that works, hook a brutha up. We have a good pizza stone and a number of other ways to cook the things. We just can't seem to find the right combination.
 

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now that's funny !
i was just looking for something else a while ago
and had to move a recipe for this to find the one i wanted.


pizza dough-
mix 3 cups flour
1 tbs olive oil
1 pinch salt
mix 3/4 cup warm water w/ 1 tbs dry yeast
and 1 tbs sugar


mix the wet and dry and knead


oil a mixing bowl and set in dough ball
and cover w/ damp towel and let rise
1-1/2 hours.


then roll out your crusts.


that's verbatim of what's written so
there may be some room for improvisation
in there somewhere. haven't made this in
quite a while, so i don't remember any
quirks or particulars


good luck
 

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Have you tried rye flour? I heard it makes good pizza dough but never tried it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ranger99 said:
now that's funny !
i was just looking for something else a while ago
and had to move a recipe for this to find the one i wanted.


pizza dough-
mix 3 cups flour
1 tbs olive oil
1 pinch salt
mix 3/4 cup warm water w/ 1 tbs dry yeast
and 1 tbs sugar


mix the wet and dry and knead


oil a mixing bowl and set in dough ball
and cover w/ damp towel and let rise
1-1/2 hours.


then roll out your crusts.


that's verbatim of what's written so
there may be some room for improvisation
in there somewhere. haven't made this in
quite a while, so i don't remember any
quirks or particulars


good luck

This is about the most basic crust recipe going. We've built on it over the years with the addition of spices like sage, rosemary, garlic, oregano, cumin and brown sugar. The best improvement comes with using vodka rather than water. No I'm not jokin. Try it. Improves the texture and leaves no vodka taste behind. We also lightly dust the stone with fine ground corn meal. This is the best we can do and it comes out OK but I would love to come up with something exceptional.


blind said:
Have you tried rye flour? I heard it makes good pizza dough but never tried it.

We have. And strange as it may seem, there is a huge difference in flour brands but especially with rye flour. Not a real fan of the texture of any of them we've tried so far though.
 

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the vodka sounds interesting.
of course the alcohol would cook
away, and leave the flavor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The vodka thing is something we saw on America's Test Kitchen. It leaves no alcohol or flavor behind. The alcohol evaporating is what improves the texture.


Oldshooter said:
Good thread! I always said if I could get my hands on a good crust recipe I could be a pizza tycoon. It is the hard part.

John Schnatter of Papa John's sure never figured it out and look at him. :D
 

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you guys using a stone. Do you spread the down out on the stone or roll it out on flour and then transfer it to the stone? Homemade pizza is one of my favorite foods but those crust mixes just don't taste like the pizza parlors crusts and I been procrastinating on buying a stone to long. ranger is that recipe for one crust?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Lloyd the stone has to be preheated to work right. Put it in the oven at 500* for 15 to 20 minutes before you're ready to bake. Make up your pizza elsewhere and transfer it to the stone. Like I mentioned above, with some crusts you need something on the stone to keep it from sticking. The best we have found is a finely ground corn meal. Dust the stone lightly and immediately throw on the pizza. Some use some of the spray on release agents but we never had much luck from them.


Our stone sets on a steel rack with 2 handles that allows us to remove the stone from the oven easily and we do the cutting right on the stone. Because of the heat in the stone the pizza will continue to cook somewhat outside the oven if you have a thick stone. Ours is only about 5/8" thick and cools quickly so it isn't an issue.
 

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ok bare with me on this as the only crusts ive made are with the packaged crust mixes but I don't see how to transfer a crust to the stone. Mine are so thin and fragile that theyd no doubt be destroyed if I tried to move them. Do you maybe roll out your crust on flour? Mine so far are just pressed out in a greased pizza pan
 

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Very thin crust try to roll the crust onto a rolling pin and then unroll it onto the stone. Working space might be tight if the rack is too high.
Be sure to dust stone with corn meal.
Use peel to remove the pizza from the oven.
How do you keep the pizza crust from sticking to the work surface while you are making it?
Could you build on the peel? Sounds real delicate.
 

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Lloyd said:
. . . . ranger is that recipe for one crust?

i'm sorry. i truly don't remember. from the amount of flour
i'd have to guess and say 2 crusts :-[
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Lloyd said:
ok bare with me on this as the only crusts ive made are with the packaged crust mixes but I don't see how to transfer a crust to the stone. Mine are so thin and fragile that theyd no doubt be destroyed if I tried to move them. Do you maybe roll out your crust on flour? Mine so far are just pressed out in a greased pizza pan

Use a pizza peel. The little paddle pizza parlors use except with a short handle. Make up the pie on a floured peel. We remove the stone from the oven. This is where the handles come in handy. A quick flip of the wrist and the pie slides right off onto the hot stone then you put the whole thing back into the oven. You could do the transfer with the stone still in the oven but it makes a floury mess. Doesn't take 10 seconds to remove, transfer and replace. Don't want the stone or oven to cool.
 

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If you use a mixer with dough hooks, get all the liquid and about 2/3 of the flour into the bowl and let it mix for about 5 minutes, then add the rest of the flour. When that is incorporated, let the machine knead it for about 4 or 5 minutes.

Roll it out THIN. When you think it's thin enough, roll it out some more.

A hot stone works best. Have it HOT!!! 450 F or so.
 

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I don't have a recipe.

I do have 35 year old experience though. Pizza dough is fairly oily. I remember making dough and handling it and my hands NEVER sticking to it, EVER. There were no secret ingredients, hard red wheat flour (bread flour), 110 deg. water, yeast, salt, vegetable oil. Mixed it up in 50 lb increments, (as much as 250#s on a good Friday night) let it rise in garbage cans, punched it down and put it in fridge. It would rise another 4 - 30 hours it was degrading at 24 IMO though. This was a fairly thin crust, a cracker type crust if you will.

Ours was rolled out and placed into a well seasoned steel pan. Sauced, then a layer of cheese, spread the pre cooked meats, add the veggies. Placed into a 550 degree oven for about 8 minutes.

Where I see most failures is trying to get too much stuff on the pizza. Too much sauce the danged thing will never crisp up. Cheese, grease ball. Meat, cheese won't really melt right and it doesn't heat fast enough. Veggies, too wet. Moderation in all things and for christs sake spread edge to edge, no wad of crap in the center.


Forum Obstructionist
 

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Empty said:
I don't have a recipe.

I do have 35 year old experience though. Pizza dough is fairly oily. I remember making dough and handling it and my hands NEVER sticking to it, EVER. There were no secret ingredients, hard red wheat flour (bread flour), 110 deg. water, yeast, salt, vegetable oil. Mixed it up in 50 lb increments, (as much as 250#s on a good Friday night) let it rise in garbage cans, punched it down and put it in fridge. It would rise another 4 - 30 hours it was degrading at 24 IMO though. This was a fairly thin crust, a cracker type crust if you will.

Ours was rolled out and placed into a well seasoned steel pan. Sauced, then a layer of cheese, spread the pre cooked meats, add the veggies. Placed into a 550 degree oven for about 8 minutes.

Where I see most failures is trying to get too much stuff on the pizza. Too much sauce the danged thing will never crisp up. Cheese, grease ball. Meat, cheese won't really melt right and it doesn't heat fast enough. Veggies, too wet. Moderation in all things and for christs sake spread edge to edge, no wad of crap in the center.


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Makes sense! I'll have to cut the recipe down a tadd ! ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Got a tip on a recipe using a bread maker to make the dough. Just throw all the fixins in a couple hours ahead of time and let it do it's thing. Toss it, add toppings and fling it on the stone. I'll be trying it this week sometime and let you know.
 

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I use my favorite bread recipe for pizza crust but I was raised on thick crust pizza.

1 3/4 cups warm water (+/- 1/8 cup)
4 Cups Flour bread flour
1 Teaspoon Salt
2 Teaspoons Yeast
2 Tablespoons buttermilk powder
1 Tablespoon honey

This recipe was a family favorite but I had to give up bread because of health reasons...

Tony
 
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