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What is the difference between the two..Is the claw extractor a controlled round feed.What would the new a-bolt brownings be??what is the advantages of each?? thanks.
 

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Controlled feed is when the bolt is closing, it picks up the round from the chamber, and holding it tight to the boltface, it chambers when the bolt is closed. The push feed pops the round out of the magazine and the boltface locks around the rim when the bolt is closed. basicly with the CRF you can push the bolt forward, then back, and the round will come out with the bolt because it is attached to it, the push feed bolt will leave the round loose. The "claw" extractor is part of the CRF system, it is what hold the cartridge against the boltface.

Not sure about the brownings, the mauser 98, springfield 03, winchester pre64 and classic model 70 are all CRF, there are others too. Some people are really sold on the CRF, im not one of them. IF it was a dangerous game rifle, maybe, but for me ill be happy with CRF for all of the hunting i do. Winchester made a smart move when they reintroduced the CRF, as lots of people seem to think it is really important. Dont get me wrong, my favorite rifle is CRF, but i dont see any advantage at all for a non dangerous game hunting rifle. Id buy a pushfeed winchester everytime over a CRF if it cost less.
 

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The controlled round feed was a design for a military rifle. The idea is you can't double feed that type of feed system since the bolt has a cartridge on it until you pull the bolt fully to the rear. It helps eliminate more human error than mechanical problems. Dave
 

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Although most people agree that the CRF is important in dangerous game hunting in theory, there really is nothing to support it in practice. Rather, it's one of those "let's get a CRF for my dangerous game hunting for just in case." Yes, it appears that most PH hunters and their clients shoot CRF Winchesters over Remington 700s, but a failure due to a non-CRF design has not been documented - at least to my knowledge. To be honest, however, I had succumbed to this "theory" and when I purchased my .375 H&H, I purchased it in a Winchester M70 Classic Stainless which has the CRF. Is it important (in theory or practice) for big game hunting such as deer and hogs, etc? I don't think so.

I own several Remingtons and Winchesters (with the CRF) in addition to Browning A-Bolts Is (not the newers IIs) and Tikkas. I have never had a failure with either of them.

Zachary
 

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It's important if you short cycle your bolt in excitement and get a stove pipe jam. I have done this with my old 300 Weatherby in a Remington action. CRF won't do this, because it pulls the cartridge back out of the way.
For me personally, I like the classic Mauser 98 design. Though I have owned push feeds. I have 2 now. Both built by Howa. The first is a Weatherby Vanguard that I received from my Dad when I was 14. The other is a Howa varmit rifle I recently purchased. I will purchase more Howa's. I think they are better built than Remingtons today. The action is very similiar to a Remington, with a Sako style extractor.
Currently I own 4 CRF rifles. I have 3 FN 98 actions, all are JC Higgins rifles. 2 are 30-06, the other is a 270. Far and away my favorite rifles, the other is a Model 70 Classic. 338 Win Mag, that's my "Alaska" rifle. It'll be headed to Nome in about a week. Stainless steel, Mel Smart's Acra-Bond Laminate stock, and a Leupold 3x9. About as American as you can get. This rifle shoots, 7/16" group at 100 yards is the best so far. And it's built to hunt, it should look good in about 10 years when it's all dinged up :wink:
 

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One Point about Controlled Feed

One thing to note if you are not familiar with controlled feed is that it is difficult to load a single round without first pushing it into the clip. I ran into this the first time I tried a CRF. I was at the range setting up a Remington I had just purchased. I tried to lay a round ontop of the follower and close the bolt. Would not close. Ended up denting the brass, before I realized what was going on.
It can be done, and from what I have since learned, this was a standard military training practice with Mausers. You have to tip the rim under the claw before closing the bolt, or else the cartridge will not snug up against the bolt face. End result, it won't go bang... YOU HOPE.
I agree it does not really make a lot of difference in any shooting situation you are likely to run into, but with that said, I still find that I like the CRF. Don't know why, other than it just feels right, somehow.
The down side is that you can essentially disable a rifle if the claw is broken or bent a bit.
Blackhat
 

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BlackHat-- I must disagree, it's quite easy to single load a CR feed weapon. The mauser being an excellant example. Suimply push against the tail of the extractor, 1/2 way between the rear end and the extractor band. This will allow the extractor to easily smap over the rim of the single loaded round. It is a bit more trouble and is probably the reason many bench and heavy varmit rifles are not CR feeds. The real advantage of the CR rifles is the huge amount of the cartridge rim grabbed by the extractor. I have not personnal preference.
 
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