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Banderso: I would find out from somebody, including Colt, if anybody out there still repairs the Python. Colt has, I think, been out of the Python business for a while and if the attitude of the customer service people there hasn't changed over the last four bankrupsies you will be schmidt out of luck if you need the thing worked on.

They used to refer to the Python as the Gentleman's 357. It is not as rough or tough as the S&Ws, Rugers or Taurus revolvers and will not handle (or chamber I should say), some of the longer nosed cast reloads.

I can't recall if the Elite was the matt blue 8" hunter style or in some other form of window dressing.

I would define what it is you wish to utilize the revolver for, and then match current production, sales and maintenance capabilities to your purchase.

IMHO. Mikey.
 

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Colt Python elite

Also see my reply in the general Handguns section.

Colt is still very much in business. Parts are not an issue with Pythons, though local gunsmiths that are capable of working on Colt D, E, and I frame revolvers may be. There are a couple of nationally known firms that do good quality work on these Colt arms, and more than a few 'smiths that do work as good or better.

The cylinder length issue for cartridges loaded with long nosed lead bullets applies also to some S&W's, as well as to some other makes and models. I might note that the original ammunition made by Winchester for the .357 Mag had bullets more like Phil Sharpe's design than Elmer Kieth's for this reason.

Colt D,E, & I frame revolvers will not, in general, withstand rough handling that many other makes will accept. This is largely due to the unique positive cylinder lock up attained through design just before firing. No other current production revolver can be timed as closely; the price paid is that maintenance is necessary more often than with other designs. If you shoot mostly 38 Specials, this really isn't much of a concern, if you shoot mostly 357's you'll probably have to service a Python at about 10,000 round intervals.

One reason to purchase a Colt D, E, and I frame revolver: you like the trigger. One reason not to purchase a Colt D, E, or I frame revolver: you don't like the trigger. If you know anyone that owns one of these Colt revolvers, ask to go shooting with him/her so that you can see what you think.

Bob
 

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Colt Python elite

I recently purchased a Colt Phython with a 4 inch barrel. Best action I've ever felt, and the bluing is superb! If I didn't know better, I'd swear they sent these to a watchmaker and jeweler for final fit and finish. Can you tell I'm impressed with this gun! :grin:
 

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Colt Python elite

Around here everyone seems to be asking a mint for just about any Python. Last week I saw a used 6" stainless (not the elite) and they were asking $875, It could have been $825 but I am pretty sure it was the former. If any of you happen to think thats a good deal email me and I'll let the second person to do so know where I saw it. Why not the first person you might ask. Because I will send him mine thats just like it as soon as he sends me the cash. :lol:
BruceP
 

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Colt Python

I have an ORIGINAL 8" Nickle plated Elite from 1985
Parts are still avalible, but I have never needed any after maybe 5000 rounds over the years.
These Pythons are VERY accurate and smooth. Groups with 357 magnum loads are in the 2" range at 50 yards with my old eyes.
As for not handling heavy loads....BUNK mine has seen 2000 rounds of 180 grain hot loaded rounds along with many 158 grain loads.
These gun holds up well.
I still feel it is one of the BEST revolvers ever made.
tom
 
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