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Im a big browning fan but Im not a big fan of Aluminum, whats the deal with these? I know theyre lighter but are they strong? How do they compare to the other Lever guns, Marlin, Winchester Mod 94? Thanks!
 

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The actions on the BLR's are actually stronger than any Winchester 94 or Marlin lever rifle. Winchester and Marlin use a rear lock up system, which isn't as strong as the rotating bolt and front locking lugs of the BLR, which lock directly into the barrel. That's why you can get the BLR in 7mm Mag and other high pressure rounds.

Don't worry about the receiver being made of aluminum.
 

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Just wait .

There seems to be some problems.
I sent my BLR 358W back last year since the hammer started to rub on the gear when operating the lever .Browning repaired it /

Then after the third box of Ammo ,I noticed the lever was starting to stick after firing a round . This will be the second summer the rifle is away for repairs.
Now I heard a few lads had the first problem , with the bolt rubbing the hammer .

Now I hear a few of the first BLRs made in Japan had a problem with soft barrels , and the 358 BLR is made in Japan.

Now I wonder "if" I dare keep this gun. Browning has had it longer in the repair , longer than I had it home in the last two years.

Are they doing to rebarrel?

Had to say . You get what they are willing to do.

I think I would ask the question on the other forums.
 

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I bought a .243 a year or so ago and it has a steel body, or at least a magnet sticks. A lot probably depends on your use. If you sight it in and only fire a couple of rounds a year, the aluminum frame will be adequate. If you shoot a lot, look for one with steel in it.
 

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I had a long action BLR some years back and if there was any aluminum in that firearm that would have surprised me. I sold it not too long after only cause of the "weight", too heavy. Aside of that issue I know of two similiar problems happening to two .308 BLR's here in my parts. Both rifles experienced a "stripped" gear. Whether it was the factory grease that never got cleaned out and used in cold weather or it was metal fatigued, I do not know. They both are not and have never use reloaded ammo either, just factory ammo. Because of that I might reconsider. I have used alot of Browning arms and still do but something about that particular problem is queersome. Just my .02 --- by the way Browning did honor to repair the problems.
 

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I have 3 blrs all made in Japan all with steel recievers and have had no problems with any. My .358 is my go to rifle for bear and hogs. As to the aluminum reciever I have a BAR with one and it shoots excepenially well and no problems in reguard to strength
 

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Since the BLR bolt locks directly into the barrel (as AR15) whether action shell is steel, aluminum or poly makes little difference in strength. Older steel framed BLRs seem to function without problem, but recent BLRs seem to have issues relating to QC, not design.
 

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Ever notice that once you buy a brand and colour of a truck , you notice how many there are just like yours .

Well I never meet so many BLR owners until I bought one .
Reports of the gear rubbing on the hammer is one problem with some of the new Alloy models . Talked to about ten new BLR shooters with this problem
The thing with the case sticking in the barrel seems to be common with the first production steel BLRs made in Japan. The barrels would be machined and set back in the receivers , but this was only a temperary fix , as the problem would recur for the high volume shooter .

Now the older BLR I had was in 308W. It had the steel receiver . It operated great , but was a real "B" with different brand s of Ammo , and reloads . Any change and it would require a major sight in. Then it also required the use of a small base die. Buy remington ammo same lot # and you might be fine , but you needed to confirm every time.

Now My new BLR is now going on two years old . It has been out for repairs last summer for the bolt hammer rubbing problem ,. I got it back to in time to finish the last few days of the deer hunt and remained in the safe for the winter after being sighted in.
This spring I took it out to the range and this case sticking thing after firing started . You would think things would hold up a bit longer than three box's of shells. The point of the lugs locking into the barrels is "NOT QUITE So " I am told.So it is not like your Alloy shotgun that you have used for years with out any issues..
If the bolt hammers the receiver , be it steel or Alloy,where the receiver needs to be machined and barrel set back , then we have an issue
So it was a gain shipped back to browning , and I might again have it for the last few days of the deer hunt.

So we shall see what happens. If I can only hunt a few days a year while it spends the rest in the repair shop, then to me it is not worth having . If I can not shoot a few hundred rounds a year with out having some issues, then likewise it is noT worth having.

So Guys there seems to be a few high priced Lemons.
And I bought this unit to replace the 1895 Marlin Guide , that was also a LEMON.

:roll: "THE LUCK OF THE DRAW" :x

Now I have also heard from Many BLR owners , with units made by FN and on into Japanese production as of to date and they just love the guns.

Do we just have a Problem with Q.C . Or does Browning have some metal or barrel issues? :?

It would be nice to hear from other BLR owners that have had issues and how they were resolved .

Thanks to all for your time
Happy
 

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How old are these BLRs that are having problems? This really takes me back.......my first hunting rifle (of my own) was a BLR in .308 purchased in 1975. What a piece of junk. You simply couldn't get the gun to group no matter what you used or did....looking back some of this has to be attributed to the barrel band set up. The worst thing was the jamming! The thing jammed at the WORST times. The pot metal POS magazine was not a quality unit such as the one on my dad's Win 88. You'd work the lever, and the rounds would all want to come up out of the mag. Under recoil, the next round in the mag would come loose because the lips of the mag wouldn't catch it right, work the lever, all the rounds would come up and out.

My dad and I took this thing to the local "Browning Authorized Gunsmith", I showed him what was happening with some dummy rounds, he promptly blamed ME for it and made me look like an idiot. Dad went to his grave shortly thereafter thinking his kid was an ingrate. I fought with Browning over this for the next year, eventually dealing with a guy who was an engineer of some sort who admitted they were swamped with these problems. I think in 1981 they redesigned the magazine system but by then I was so upset I dumped the gun and said to **** with Browning, although I did keep my B-2000 shotgun; but if it breaks I can't get it fixed since Browning decided not to make them anymore.

I purposely haven't followed Browning much since then. I did get treated like a second class citizen in their Morgan, UT outlet store recently. Maybe someday (and I'm reachin' here) someone with a brain in that outfit will figure out that while expensive, there was a reason Browning's reputation came from Belgian made guns....but then, aren't they owned by the French? :roll:

RR
 
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