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I am an avid bowhunter that is intrested in handgun hunting..I have not had much experience shooting a hand gun and I was wondering if you had any advise as how to get started. A guy I hunted with suggested that I become proficent at a lower caliber (.22) and then make a move up to a higher caliber. He said that when you first start it take alot of pratice to get good and if I started with a larger claiber it could cost me alot $$$$ before I get good. Thanks
 

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You could start with a 357 Mag. but only shoot 38 Specials until you become comfortable with it. After sufficient practice, move up to full power 357 Mag loads. You can use these effectively for deer out to 75-100 yds.

A Thompson Contender is my favorite hunting handgun, it's easily scoped and you can add different calibers for just the price of a new barrel.

Greg
 

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Gettin Started

Your friend is right, get a good quallity 22 to start with, something like a Ruger or a buckmark and start honing your skills before you start shooting the stout stuff. I know a lot of people who stated out shooting the magnums and never developed any good shooting habits. They still can't hit the side of a barn!
 

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:D Your friend is correct...I have been shooting a handgun for a lot of years,and once in awhile i will develope a flinch..thee only way i can get rid of it is to take out the .22 and consentrate on the sight picture while the trigger is being squeezed....You dont have to shoot thousands of rounds to be a good handgun shot,it helps...just keep doing the same thing every time that you hit the target...If ya use a .357 keep it to no further that 50 yards at the most....I tell everyone that i teach to shoot at a paper plate..when you canputt all of your rounds into that plate,at whateverdistance it is,then back off about 25 yards,you will be all set. That .22 will teach you a lot about trigger pull,sight picture,and stance..all while atempting to hit the target...when it all comes together..you willknow...andif it falls apart a little..go back to the .22..... 8)
 

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I like the Ruger Single Six personally. I've also had Ruger Mark II Targets that were really nice and a Buckmark made by Browning. I like the Single Six for the simple reason that it is a lot like shooting my 44 Ruger Super Blackhawk. The only downfall is that you only have 6 shots and then the reloading takes a little longer than the autos with magazines. You can usually pick up a Blue Single Six for about $300 and Stainless ones run in the $350 range. Ruger Mark II Targets in Stainless with a 5.5" barrel run in the $325-350 range depending on where you get it of course.
 

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I would recommend the Ruger Super Single Six. I bought one a while back, and just love it. I got the 6.5 inch barrel model in stainless. It is a very accurate revolver for target shooting and hunting. It's best groups are 7/8 inch at 25 yds with open sights using CCI Maximag Solid point with 6 shot group. Mine likes the .22 magnums a little better than it does the .22lr. I haven't shot any shorts, so I don't know how well it likes those. These guns are built very stout, and with care, will last an extremely long time.

I have taken several squirrels with this revolver, and must say it is both challenging and quite rewarding to hunt with! The stainless finish is much easier to maintain on a hunting revolver than the blued finish. If you have any scratches or a cylinder line(which you will), a scotchbrite pad will make the finish look like new again. Once the finish is scratched on the blued gun, it is harder to get back right again. The Super Single Six also has fully adjustable sights. You will want a handgun with fully adjustable sights for shooting/hunting, especially since it allows you to adjust for different ammo. Stay away from models with fixed sights.

The velocity for this firearm is very interesting. With some 22magnum loads, you should obtain more velocity than you would have if shooting 22lr through a rifle length barrel. But, you will not have the velocity that is achieved through using magnums in a rifle length barrel. What this means is that 22 magnum bullet velocity through this revolver is better than most folks hunting with 22lr rifles, but you don't have the 'bullet explosiveness' associated with 22 magnum rifles. I like being able to use the 22lr for cheap practice/plinking and being able go up to the 22 magnum cylinder for hunting.

I was looking for a good deal and had to search for about 6 months before buying my Super Single Six. The cheapest I could find one of these models was about $350. All the local dealers were selling them for $400 plus tax. I got lucky and found a one owner revolver in excellent condition on the internet that had all the original papers, original box, spare cylinder, leather cowboy cartridge drop belt and holster, and extra pearlite grips for $250. I swiped that one before someone else had the chance to. If you decide to get a used one, make sure the cylinders both have the last three numbers of the gun's serial number engraved on them. If it has a cylinder that is not original to the gun, it may not have been fitted correctly and could cause problems. Good luck finding whatever you decide to get!

:blaster: :sniper:
 

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Handgun Hunting 101

Hello tpomp,

I think you will do well applying your bowhunting skills to the sport of handgun hunting, but before you can hunt sucessfully, you must be able to shoot successfully.

IMO, the best way to start is learn the proper mechanics of shooting with a .22 LR in a quality handgun. Be prepared to practice, practice, practice. Read all you can, get quality instruction, solicit advice (you'll soon learn to discern the good from the bs). Ideally, learn to shoot from someone who is adept and accomplished in the field.

Once you have a grip on the mechanics (pun intended), start looking for a 357 magnum. It makes for a smoother transition to the larger calibers you'll eventually want to shoot, and is cost effective, by using the 38 specials for practice. When you are comfortable with the 357, (which won't take long, IF you have applied sound mechanics and fundamentals) you are at a good place to start.

IMO the most suitable hardware for this endeavor is a T/C Contender.
 

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:wink: Save your self a lot of time & money Id buy a contender with a 22 cal barrel, put a good scope on it & shoot. After about 500 rounds or so you will know if you like handguns. If so you can up grade barrels to just about any cal. for a lot less money than buying a lot of different guns :D
 

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Next Step

Ok, so you've got yourself a .22 and you've practiced, practiced, practiced...What's next?

For the money counscious buyer who may be able to afford only one other pistol for a while, what would be a good caliber to "grow" with? I'm thinking about going the .45 (long) Colt route in a single action. I've heard that it's able to cover a wide range of perfomance and is suitable to many different applications with various loads and bullet weight/types.

So here's my question: How much recoil does a light .45 LC plinking round generate? (Handloading is an option for me.) Is it a good step up from a .22? I want to step up to the next level, not take a flying leap.

Thanks in advance for any advice.
 

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:D The recoil generated by the .45colt would be directly related to the weight of the handgun u are using...I would assume that u are going to purchase one with a 7.5 inch brl.....I shoot a .45 colt and its a schofield model 1875,topbreak...In this one u cant put in souped up loads,so get a stronger gun,...the light plinking loads i am using present very little felt recoil....the projo is a 250 grn flatpoint....The .45 can and does cover a wide range of hunting applications......but no handgun should be used beyond 100 yards...i think anything beyond that is kinda a stunt ,but it can and will be done.....a .45 in comercial loads is a fine deer size cartridge out to around 50-75 yards,at the most...Most guys will tell you to get a .357 and use .38 specials in it...I would do the same thing but i learned a long time ago to let the guy get what he wants.....the .38s are great for plinking,and small game...the .357 is good for game up to deer at ranges no further than 75 yrds..you can also soup the .45 up to greater power,but then again it depends on the handgun u purchased...get some reloading manuals,and dont be afraid to ask people that reload..but always check what they are telling u in a book..first..before ya shoot that round...good luck and i hope that i did not confuse ya anymore that ya already were....get what u want,and read up on it....king :toast:
 

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Yes if you find single actions appeal to you the .45 Colt or .44 Mag either one will do about all you'll likely need it to for a long time to come. Even tho not really a fan of them the Ruger single actions are strong and will do fine for such work as you have in mind. If you use factory level loads which generally push a 250-255 grain bullet to 800-950 fps you'll find recoil in a Ruger to be very mild. Hardly more than a .38 Special load in most .38 revolvers.

GB
 

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The 45 would be a good way to go. Check out this article by John Linebaugh, its pretty good and will give you some insight in the power levels that can be worked up to in the 45. Note that he mentions the info in the article is only good for New Model Blackhawks and Bisley Blackhawks. The bisley blackhawk would be a nice one to have due to the grip shape handling the recoil so much better than the standard grip shape. Here is a link to the article. See what you think.

http://208.251.255.244/linebaugh/dissolving.htm
 
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