Graybeard Outdoors banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone. I am a 20 year old Kansas resident and am new at reloading. I got my kit in June of last year and after extensive studie and help from a reloader I started in August. (Made sure I researched it all before I'd start.) I am getting fairly proffecient in pistol loads and now wanna try rifle ammo. I got one problem, my friend who showed me how to expand the necks on ammo for rifle reloads,(british .303 to be exact) is gonna be out of town for a while and I forgot how to do it. The die plans I have, (lee carbide reloading dies, deprimer, bullet seater, and factory crimp) do not say anything at all about resizing the case necks on them. So how do I do it with the said die? I noticed one of the other rifle dies are the same so I figure there's a different trick for rifle than pistol. (Hence why I haven't touched them yet.) Any advice is greatly appreciated. Thanks alot all.


Nice forums, btw.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
698 Posts
Questions about reloading bottelneck Rifle

If you have set of Lee dies, make ABSOLUTELY certain that they say carbide, and that you're not assuming that all dies are carbide dies. Many pistol dies are carbide dies, many bottleneck rifle cartridge dies are not carbide dies. The difference between the two lies in the molecular structure, which I will not get into, but KNOW THIS. If your dies DO NOT say carbide for your bottle-necked cartridges, you need to lube them with a good case lube. Lyman, Lee, RCBS, etc. all make lube kits. If you try to run the cartridge up the dies without the lube you'll get it in, but you won't get it out, it will get stuck, trust me, I've been there. Now the Lee dies come in a set of 4 that you have apparently purchased, one should say FULL LENGTH RESIZING DIE (then it should name the caliber, say, .308 Winchester). Put this die in, run the ram of your press to the top, screw the die in until it contacts the ram, then back off a half-turn, should be able to fit a nickel in the gap between the ram at it's highest point and the bottom of the die. Set your locking ring there, you've now adjusted the die to resize the brass to chamber in 95% of .308's made. Lube up your cases and resize them. This die will resize the body of the case, the neck, and punch out your primer. From there, if you've loaded a pistol, you know what to do, except you don't need to expand/bell the case mouths to seat your bullets. There are other ways of setting up your resizing dies that involve a little work and some fired brass from YOUR gun, but you wanted general information and I gave it to you, this is also how you should set up your dies if you intend to hunt with your rifle, they'll chamber easier and the accuracy difference is measure in tenths and hunredths of an inch, not in minute-of-a-deer. I hope this helps, if you have any other questions, just ask away, we're here all day!
Selmer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,962 Posts
Questions about reloading bottelneck Rifle

I have never seen a set of carbide bottle neck dies. They would be too expensive to produce. Plus you would still have to lube them because of the surface contact when re-forming the case. Negates any advantage of using carbide. You also need to check your sized case in you rifle before you finnish reloading it if your setting your die a little off the shell holder as Selmer explained. If it won't quite chamber you'll need to turn your sizing die down a little farther untill it does.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Questions about reloading bottelneck Rifle

Ah, my mistake, it wasn't carbide but steel. The exact set is at: http://www.midwayusa.com/rewriteaproduct/764178

I noticed it was a bit tighter whe I test-fed a shell in it some months ago and decided to use a lube on it anyway since it felt tighter, didn't know about all of them being non-carbide. (I was sure it was carbide, this is what happens when you don't study all of your equipment. )


Well thanks guys, sure do appreciate it, my friend must have a different set, he has one that bells out the .303 necks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
557 Posts
Questions about reloading bottelneck Rifle

Rhett

The only reason to bell the mouths of rifle rounds is the same reason to do so with pistol, to seat lead bullets. If he is using cast bullets, this is appropriate. If not, it's an unnecessary step in the process. Most rifle sets do not come with a neck expansion die, it would have to be specially ordered. The exception to this is BPCR sets, where it is assumed that cast bullets witll be used.

Lube your cases and go for it. Be sure to wipe the lube off after resizing, you don't want a lubed case in your chamber. That's why I like the water based lubes, they can simply be wiped clean.

If you are using a SMLE, you will need to trim your cases relatively soon. You should have a caliper to measure them and a case trimmer to trim them to length. SMLE's and the Swiss straight pull rifles now on the market are rear locking bolts, and these cause more case stretch than front locking bolts. Thus the need to monitor case length more closely. If the case of overly long it will extend into the barrel as the case is chambered, swaging it into the bullet. This causes rapid pressure rise, and those rifles are not all that strong. I wouldn't want to be the one on the trigger when it happens.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Questions about reloading bottelneck Rifle

Ah, thanks for the tip on case lenght, I know to monitor it more in rifle loads but not about the Enfields. All of the brass I have has never been fired so it should be good.


My friend is ex-military, so he's a bit oddball. :) (Not that I have anything against grunts, plan on being one some day.)
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top