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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As a kid I used to run in the woods and catch the occasional Grinner, muskrat, **** etc. That ended when my woods became a subdivision. More years later than I will admit to, I'm in an area with lots of Fox, Coyotes, and Bobcats ( a first for me ). I've been predator calling, but I'd like to try some limited trapping next season.

I've been reading all the great info you all have been sharing and would like to ask a few questions. I have a couple of books, but they are very basic.

What is night latching?

I've heard reference to a brand of trap called a jake, what is that, why is it good, and where does one get them?

I've heard about a modification called offset jaws, what does that do?

Can I use one size and style trap for the species mentioned above or should I try to target species with a specialized trap size and set? All three occur on the land I have available.

Any Info Would Be Most Appreciated,
China hand
 

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Information

Nite latching is the modifing the dog and trap pan of trap so it is easy to set when dark or poor light to see trap pan and dog easy. The dog is notched and pan is modified to fit in notch. WHen setting trap you hear a (snick) when dog and pan meet their notch and trap is ready to put into place for what ever you are trapping. The Jake trap is made by J.C. Conner of Ohio. It is a cadillac of canine traps. You buy it, prepare for trapping such as boiling, waxing ect and set it. NO modifications needed. Offset jaws on traps are to allow trap levers to come up higher on trap jaws to get a better locking postion in holding canines paw. Depending upon what trap you choose there are available traps that you can use on all three species and do a good job such as nbr 2 or 3. Type of trap is usually the trappers preferance and experience in trapping that determines what he wants to use. Sometimes if trapper doesnt have money to buy already modified traps he can do it himself if he has welder and metal skills and save some money BUT it still takes time and proper knowledge to modify trap to work properly. There are books out that you can purchase that will lead you in right direction. Also plan to attend your states trapper rondys so you can ask questions and learn more. Trappers will run off at the mouth (LOL) and help you now days . YEars ago it was a tight lip society with alot of trappers not wanting to give secrets away. Hope this helps abit. Any more questions fire away.
 

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There was a article in F-F-G a while back on trap modification. It had some good pics of night latching as well. Ill try to see if I can find it when I go back down to the 'fur shed'.
Tim B
 

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The article is called, TIME FOR A TRAP TUNE-UP written by Dave Morelli. Its in the Oct 2002 issue of Fur-Fish-Game.
Tim B
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank You Both

That is helpful. I'm just going to stick to basics, but much of what I was reading shows me there is a lot to learn. I run a metal fabricating plant, so modifications are probably easy for me to do. Right now I am just concentrating on building some basic knowledge so I know hat I'm doing. I'd like buy my initial equipment once if possible.

Meanwhile I'm "practicing" on all my little woodland buddies that come to visit the chickens at night. Again, thanks for the help.

China hand
 

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Ole Rdfx gave you a good run down and I agree with him on every thing. I would like to extend two points a bit, for I feel that you may get some more ideas. Night latching is exactly what the ole Fox described. However, it also gives another advantage; the night latch or gun trigger results in a shorter travel distance for tripping the trap. With the appropriate pan tension the trigger is not a hair trigger and can do away with alot of the problems of bedding etc associated with pan covers...I don't use pan covers at all but simply plug under the pan with a small bit of aged fiber glass insulation.

Secondly, offset jaws do exactly as Rdfx says. In addition there is a gap between the closed jaws which, when done correctly for the speices to be taken, can reduce paw damage, bone breakage and lost critters. Here in NM all traps must be offset for this reason. I personally would offset all my traps for Coyotes, Cats and fox. I understand from those in the know that offsets may not be as good for *****.
 
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