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I do not own one.
I have read comparisons between several different models and the good news was that even the cheaper ones worked well on the range accuracy.

What would you like to use one for?. I think that it could work very well for Varmints but to use one for Predators that you are calling in could cause un-due movement on your part.
 

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glanceblamm said:
What would you like to use one for?. I think that it could work very well for Varmints but to use one for Predators that you are calling in could cause un-due movement on your part.
Exactly. Well said. Now knowing that the bush that looks like hillary is 45 yds away and that the rock in the corner of the field in 128 yds will give you ranging points. Just don't waste a round on the hillary bush you will only let the rest of thevarmints know you are there.
 

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I have a Nikon 440 yard range finder that I bought for archery hunting. I am happy with it's performance so far, I can see using it for varmit or predator hunting, but only to mentally mark distances on rocks, trees or hay rolls before the hunting begins.

my .02$
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Basically, I'd be using it at "the range" (set up next to the barn) to double check my yardages. Also, when out in the field, I'd use it to find range "markers" (that one lone tree, that big ol' rock over there, or maybe even the hillery bush back in that far corner) not necessarily on game itself. I do bow hunt when my shoulders say I can. And it would be used there as well....

My goal, with the new rifle, is now stretched out to 500 yards. Will the Nikon be the hot ticket or should I look elsewhere?
 

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I have had a reading with my Nikon 440 at 507 yards, I was aiming at a truck across a lake just playing around. The farthest I have gotten a reading in the woods was at 462 yards aiming at a large boulder. I guess the accuracy all depends on how reflective the object is your are trying to range. I don't plan on shooting farther than 500 yards, so for the money this unit works for me. I think I paid around $250.00 at Gander Mountain two years ago.

I use it for the same reasons as your intentions, ranging rocks and trees in different directions from possible areas game may come from to enter my hunting location.

I was surprised how much farther I thought things were, than they actually are...... If I would guess 75 yards, it was actually like 55-60 yards.
 

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With a proper predator rifle 0 to 200 yards should be point and shoot, you should not need to know the range at all. My 17 Remington is 3/4 inch high at 100 yards to be dead on at 200 and an inch low at 230 or so. Most of the other flat shooters will be the same, a range finder is just one more thing to clutter your mind. Larry
 

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Anything below 300 yards not needed. But beyond that you should have the time and freedom of movement to make the distance known.

Since most of my hunting is above treeline and on snow, I use a range finder all the time. I hunt wolves, and find them down in a valleys on kills. I am only able to get so close and have to take long shots, therefore I need to know the yardage. With a 30-06 I will take shots out to 500 yards. With my .338/378 Weatherby I can reach on out to 800 yards. Guessing don't cut it at that range. I have a Bushnell Yardage Pro, a Leupold RX-IV, a Leica, and Unkown brand of German make.
 

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Sourdough, since the range finders work on reflections, how badly, if at all, does the snow glare on sunny days affect the range finders? I guess the same question could be asked of guys in the northern states.
 

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As stated if your not going to shoot over 300 yrds. you don`t need a range finder. Around here it very difficult to call in coyotes so I spend alot of time just watching for them, most of the time with a friend. We will shoot at them as long as we have a safe shooting lane. I use a .22-6mm with eather a sierra or a Berger 80 gn. .22 cal. bullet. Gene usually uses a 7 mm Rem. mag. Both gun wear an 8 1/2 to 25 X Lepould. Even with the flat shooting rifles we use the drop of the bullet, if you miss judge the range 50 yrds at 600 yrds. will cause a miss. We not only use range finders but we also measure the wind velosity and carry chartes telling us the MOA to dial in and the wind drift in inches at the range to the traget. With my rifle I get a drfit of 28.3 in. at 600 yrds. with a 10 mph cross wind. Long range shooting is a combation of science and art, but it`s alot of fun. ;)
 

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On bright days the Leupold is useless, on snow. Depending on glare the Bushnell usually works, or at least can give a reading to get me close form a diffract object. The Leica works about like the Bushnell, but the German made one is different. With the German made one I focus on any abject out to 1000 yards and then rotate a dial till the split image aligns. But the German one is a lot bulkier and takes longer to operate and has to be calibrated more often. It is also easy to knock out of calibration.

Since most days are overcast I usually carry the Bushnell and Leupold because they are compact and easy to carry. The Leica's are made with a pair of Binoculars and are large and bulky. I seldom carry them.
 

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I use a Leica 1200 now and love it, I have owned Bushnell, Nikon, and Leupold and the Leica is by far the best I have used. If you can see it it will range it, no matter what weather or low light conditions you run into.
 

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Sourdough,
I use the Leupold's that are made like bino`s and they seem to work better on snowy bright days. I like them because I don`t have to carry a pair of bino`s when useing them, but would like a range finder that would range a coyote at 600 or 700 yrds. without haveing to hit something close to it for range.
 

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I got a Bushnell Yardage Pro Sport 450 that I use primarily for archery hunting. It was approx. $150 from Cabelas and it works pretty good for the money. It doesn't have the ARC angle reading capabilities but when I'm out scouting I do all the ground level ranging (from where I'll set up my stand/blind) and mark spots for reference with reflective ribbon to take the guess work out of making upward or downward angled shots.
 

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I have a Leica 1200 CRF and have been very impressed with it. I have ranged tree lines out to 1300+ yards. Moose out to 800 yds. Prairie dog mounds to over 500 yds.
It is one accurate and easy to use slick unit.

Aim Small, Miss Small
Savage Vaporizer
 

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I've had my BYP 1000 for about 8-9 years and it does the job well. On a digger hunt some years ago a friend with a Leica 800 and I compared them side-by-side. They were always within a yard of each other, but the BYP would read targets the Leica wouldn't. The 6X of the BYP showed advantages over the 4X of the Leica too, and the BYP can be mounted on a tripod. I've heard the new Leica 1200 is a great little unit, but have not used one myself. Figured if I ever had to replace the BYP it would be with the new Leica though.

Even in the digger fields they were used only to get range referrals prior to shooting a new field for the first time. Would be the same predator hunting although I've never used mine for that.
 

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During the winter we avoid severe[/color] clear days, they are brutal for cold. I only go out when the temp is above -20 (Twenty below) and on those days it is usually cloudy. On cloudy days I take a reading from a tree or bank, or the kill itself.
 
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