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Have an arthritic shoulder and my TC carbine, .223, is rather uncomfortable to shoot after a few rounds. I'm thinking the .204 might be about as effective, on close in shots, as my .223 but with a softer recoil. Wonder if I could get a comment or two using the analogy of , about the same recoil, about half, somewhat less, way less. General evaluation would be great. Thanks. DG
 

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I have 2 .204 carbines both on 23" full bull barrels. I did at one time have a similar .223 barrel. Can't honestly say I could tell any difference in the two for recoil....the added weight of a .204 barrel being the only real difference. They both burn about the same amount of powder, slightly more for the .204. The bullets for a common .223 run 40-60 gr. and for a .204 30-45 gr. One of my .204s I made a very heavy foreend for to eliminate any significant gun movement shooting off a bench...that helped alot. Another option is a .221 FB carbine length, I have one of those and there is less recoil with it than the other two.

FYI - I found the .204 to be more effective than the .223 on long shots, close shots and all shots.
 

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I have reloaded for both.

You could definitely down load the .204, still have .223 ballistics and get less recoil. Especially if you use a full length barrel for the .204.

You probably know that a .223 has a point blank range (1 inch high at 100 yards) of about 235 yards. The .204 will go out a full 300 yards using the 4000 fps ammo. If you used 32 grain bullets and loaded at around 3300 fps you would start getting into very low recoils.

My .204 Encore barrel is for sale on the classifieds too :)
 

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skb2706 said:
FYI - I found the .204 to be more effective than the .223 on long shots, close shots and all shots.
Every groundhog or crow that I hit with my .223 ends up dead. Does the .204 make 'em dead'er?

Dave
 

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Davemuzz said:
skb2706 said:
FYI - I found the .204 to be more effective than the .223 on long shots, close shots and all shots.
Every groundhog or crow that I hit with my .223 ends up dead. Does the .204 make 'em dead'er?

Dave
What does 'deader' have anything to do with what I wrote ? What it says is "I found it to be more effective", frankly I don't care what your results are. As coltdriver posted your range is extended.
 

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I believe that as miniscule as the recoil of both rounds is you'd only be able to see or determine a difference in a mathematical calculation not from the feel on your shoulder. Like you I have a seriously bum shoulder and as a result am now using the .410 almost exclusively when shooting skeet. My shoulder just can't take much recoil anymore.

But back to the two rounds case capacity is almost identical in them with the .204 Ruger having a very slightly greater capacity. If you used them both in identical rifles with identical weight then the only reason one would recoil more will likely be the slight difference in bullet weight. Velocity potential is the same given same bullet weight. So use a 40 grain in both and recoil will be the same. Use the 32 in the .204 and the Hornady 35 in the .223 and again for all practical purposes recoil is identical. But use the 50 in a .223 and a 32 in the .204 and you might (MIGHT mind you) actually feel a slight difference.

If you use heavy full bull barrels 24" to 26" long it's darn hard to even tell they recoil. I know that in Remington Varmint rifles with 26" barrels no matter how much I shoot the .223 it bothers my super sensitive shoulder not in the least. The Encore with similar barrel is about the same weight.
 

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To be honest, with comparable loads, you could be blindfolded at the bench and not know which cartridge you have just fired. In the real world, the difference is negligible.

Of course, if you were blindfolded for this experiment, your groups may start to look like Dave's -- JUST KIDDING, Dave!
 

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sweetwyominghome said:
To be honest, with comparable loads, you could be blindfolded at the bench and not know which cartridge you have just fired. In the real world, the difference is negligible.

Of course, if you were blindfolded for this experiment, your groups may start to look like Dave's -- JUST KIDDING, Dave!
Oh.....So you are a member of my gun club? Damn.....I'm gonna have to start postin my own targets now!!! :p


Dave
 

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A quick and cheap fix is a Past recoil shield. I have a bull barrel contender in .223 and was at the range yesterday and my shoulder was acting up. Put my recoil shield on and that took all the sting out of it. Another way is a slipon Limbsaver pad. That is what I use on my 20 ga. over and under. That and two Aleve every morning.
 
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