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Gents what does this caliber relate to for recoil? Is it a lot more than a 30-06? About that of a .300 Win. Mag.? Just always wondered. Buckfever
 

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Medium Bore Rifles

Buckfever,

You will find the whelen to be between the 06 and the 375 H&H If its in a well stoched rifle its not so bad..........Joe..........
 

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Somewhere between 06 and 375. Well I guess that is correct but I feel you won't be able to tell much diff between 35 whelen and a 06. as for a 375 H&H not even close.
Here is something to go by,

Recoil out of a whelen on a 8lbs rifle is 22.6
30-06 out of a 6lbs rifle is 20.3 shooting 180 gr.
300 win mag shooting 180gr 8.5 lbs rifle is 25.9
as for a 375 H&H shooting 270 gr, 36.1
:D
 

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I have a .358 Norma which pushes a Speer 250gr at about 2700 fps. This is hotter than the Whelen.
After 12-15 rounds, my frontal lobes get tired of being whacked by my skull and I put the gun away in favor of something milder.
A heavy-barrel Whelen probably won't be too much different from a standard-weight '06.

John
Cape Canaveral
 

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Medium Bore Rifles

moreens,

I happen to have all three and i contend that the 35 Whelen is about in the middle range. Most of the people know that an ill fitting stocked 06 will kick the snot out of ya where a good fitting stock that is set up right will be easy on the shooter. To me them charts don't mean beans. I SAY if you take all three guns and stock them the same the felt recoil of the 35 whelel will be about mid ways between the 06 and the 375 H&H. Now we have to consider the weight of the bullets, You can shoot a lighter bullet in the 375 H&H and a heavier bullet in the whelen thats going to be a whole different ball game. Different guns kick harder, I have a Ruger #1 that kicks like my 416Rem. Mag. It hurts twice as much as my other. 375 H&H.
...............Joe................
 

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My M700 Classic in 35 Whelen with 225 gr PT or 250 gr PT recoils between a 30-06 and a 300 Win Mag.

Great shooting gut for deer and Black Bear here in MI.

Regards,

JD338.
 

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Medium Bore Rifles

YEA RIGHT
 

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Sorry for the typo, :oops: Daughter was hounding me to load up horses.
I meant to say,
Great shooting gun for deer and bear here in MI.

Regards,

JD338
 

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45-70,
my comparison is that all things equal. if I am not worthy of beleiving go to chuck hawks .com that is where I got my info. Can you explain to me how a 35 whelen recoils more than a 300 win mag? Yeah a 300 that has more power recoils less that a 35 whelen. Im not trying to be smart, I just don't know how you can even make such an argument. It seems I am not the only one that see it that way! :D
 

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I would imagine a fast 35 whelen with a heavy bullet could kick more than a 300 mag..My /06 browning has kicked me harder than a friends ruger 300 winchester..Has alot to do with the weight of the gun and the stock..My CZ-550 in 375H&H is a sweet shooter as it is heavy..The 260 accubonds do not kick bad but the 300 grainers can when puched fast..
 

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I'd have to say, at the risk of incurring oso45-70's wrath that a Whelen with a suitable stock should "feel" closer to a 30-06. :|
But then all recoil is felt and it's a funny thing.
Some rifles that feel bad should be fine but others are complete pigs despite the fact they're shooting a light load half the weight.
I reckon a 6lb Whelen with "hot'n'heavy" loads would slap you round sillier than a circus clown with a rubber rolling pin. :x :mrgreen:
 

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I also disagree with the comparison to magnum loads, and emphatically disagree that it is between 30-06 and 375. A 375 kicks the snot out of you, a Whelen DOES NOT. I shoot an Ackley Improved, and with lighter bullets and loads about equal velocity with sililar weight bullets....180-200 gr....the Whelen actually seems lighter than my 30-06. Both my 30-06 and my Whelen are nearly identical P-17's. I rebarreled my Whelen from a matching 30-06. About the only difference in these two rifles is that the 30-06 has a BETTER recoil pad.
225 gr bullets loaded with medium loads still feel fairly close to 30-06. If I load them really hot with Paco Kelly loads...then I start to feel a little more recoil. With 250 gr jacketed bullets loaded hot..then there is recoil. With 280 gr cast bullets....once again with cast loads...the recoil goes back down to about 30-06 levels.
I don't know how manny folks understand this...but larger bore rifles with similar weight bullets work at lower pressures. The difference between .308 caliber and 8mm (.323) will give less felt recoil with the 8mm if you are using the same weight bullet and same powder charge.
This applies equally to the Whelen. You can use bigger/heavier bullets in the Whelen with similar recoil and still get the down-range ballistics of a lighter bullet in 30-06.
These are not guesses or assumptions, these are facts.
 

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I shot my Whelen today and found the recoil to be a little more than my .30-06. I did not find it to be uncomfortable.

I would add here that stock fit is important. And a good recoil pad helps. I find my whelen, which just "feels right" to be more comfortable to shoot than my Dad's old 721 in .270. The difference being that the 721 has a shorter LOP, and is narrower. It feels awkward. I am not implying that a .270 generates less recoil energy than the .35, but is less comfortable to shoot because of a poorly fitting stock.

John
 

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Worked these out for reference:

8 lb Rifles
.257 Roberts 120 gr @ 2880 12.3 ft-lbs
7mm-08 140 gr @ 2840 14.9 ft-lbs
7X57 Mauser 140 gr @ 2820 15.5 ft-lbs
.270 Win 150 gr @ 2900 19.5 ft-lbs
.308 Win 180 gr @ 2650 20.1 ft-lbs
.30-06 Sprfld 180 gr @ 2760 22.6 ft-lbs

8.5 lb Rifles
7mm Rem Mag 160 gr @ 3010 22.6 ft-lbs
.338-06 210 gr @ 2690 24.9 ft-lbs
250 gr @ 2410 28.1 ft-lbs
.35 Whelan 225 gr @ 2500 25.2 ft-lbs
.300 Win Mag 180 gr @ 3070 29.9 ft-lbs

9 lb Rifle
.338 Win Mag 210 gr @ 2900 31.9 ft-lbs
250 gr @ 2690 34.7 ft-lbs
9.5 lb Rifle
.375 H & H 300 gr @ 2600 43.9 ft-lbs

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
35 Whelen Recoil

Thanks all for the comparisons and listed ballistics. I picked up a Tikka Whitetail Hunter in a new .308, wood and blue that had been riding the wood gun rack because in that rural area everybody shoots common names. I don't mean that is bad , I have had and still do guns of many makers.
Recently I have been thinking about making a trade of the Tikka for a 35 Whelen and use it for big whitetails in Canada. I don't want to develop a flench and it would have to be accurate my Tikka's have spoiled me. I thought that a 225gr bullet might slow them down. Those 300lb bucks just take off like you hit them in the butt with a .22. They are usually found not more than 200 yards away. So these are the reasons I asked for real gun hunters experiences. Thank you all for the information.

Buckfever
p.s. just once I would like to flatten one, be good for my head!!
 

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recoil???

PERCEIVED recoil is a very subjective thing. It has too many variables to realistically calculate - stock design, state of mind, how much clothing is worn, shooter's stance (position), etc. But, PHYSICAL recoil is merely a mathematical calculation. Given that the weight of the rifle is the same, recoil becomes a function of bullet weight, bullet velocity, and powder charge weight. Using a calculator and assuming an 8 lb. rifle produced these results:

1. 200 gr. bullet, 2700 fps, 50 grs. powder (30-06) - recoil factor = 29
2. 200 gr. bullet, 2900 fps, 60 grs. powder (300 mag) - recoil factor= 36
3. 300 gr. bullet, 2700 fps, 60 grs. powder (375 mag) - recoil factor= 59
4. 250 gr. bullet, 2500 fps, 50 grs. powder (35 Whelen) - recoil factor= 36

My charge weights are rough approximations and my velocities are totally from memory, so I may be off by some amount.

I was a little surprised that the 35 Whelen and the 300 Mag. came out this close, although I did suspect they would be about the same. Of course, the rifle weight will not be the same in the real world. In the real world, the 35 Whelen might be the lightest of the four and the 375 Mag. would likely be the heaviest, which would moderate the 375 Mag. and exaggerate the 35 Whelen.

In truth, the 35 Whelen probably does recoil more like a 30-06 than a 375 Mag., most 300 magnums probably recoil about the same as the 35 Whelen.

My point is: MEASURABLE recoil is a "product" of bullet weight, rifle weight, and velocity. Of course!, if you load the same weight bullets, at the same velocity, in the same weight rifle; the recoil will be the SAME, wether it's a 30-06, 300 Mag., or 35 Whelen.

This can turn into a discourse of splitting hairs and be endless, but in generality, if you increase either velocity or bullet weight the recoil will go up. If you increase BOTH, the recoil goes up much more dramatically.
 

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Re: 35 Whelen Recoil

We still flatten those boys with the thirdy/ Dirtty. Just take the lungs out!
Want to get fancy- use the 45/70 shoot them in an angle away shot and still take the lungs out.
It is when on the same trip we meet a four to five hundred pound bear by surprize at close range , cause at twenty yards and quick shootin', we tend not to aim so good . that is why I carry the 358 now, and lots of :oops: bathroom paper.
Now that whelan would be a great gun as long as that second shot can come close to the first one .
Leave the bolt for the open and planned shot.
Happy
Buckfever said:
Thanks all for the comparisons and listed ballistics. I picked up a Tikka Whitetail Hunter in a new .308, wood and blue that had been riding the wood gun rack because in that rural area everybody shoots common names. I don't mean that is bad , I have had and still do guns of many makers.
Recently I have been thinking about making a trade of the Tikka for a 35 Whelen and use it for big whitetails in Canada. I don't want to develop a flench and it would have to be accurate my Tikka's have spoiled me. I thought that a 225gr bullet might slow them down. Those 300lb bucks just take off like you hit them in the butt with a .22. They are usually found not more than 200 yards away. So these are the reasons I asked for real gun hunters experiences. Thank you all for the information.

Buckfever
p.s. just once I would like to flatten one, be good for my head!!
 

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Re: .358

Buckfever said:
What .358 are you using and please talk about recoil and knock down power. Thanks Buckfever

I am using the 358 W in the new light weight BLR ( Browning Lever).
This rifle is just under seven pounds , easy to carry and points naturally.
I find the recoil of this round close to that of the 308 with factory 200 gr, bullets and again as a reloader , recoil goes up as the weight of the bullet goes up. The BLR has an excellent recoil pad, so I do not notice recoil as I also shoot a bolt action 3006.
Your not going to pick off a chuck @ four hundred yards with this round , but feel it's going down at 250 yards, if you do your part.
Here in Central Ontario , mixed farm land and bush the round is about perfect for deer, bear and moose, that we would encounter , and it is quickly catching on with the hunters. These rifles ar sought after and now there is a waiting list for a used unit.

In these parts you can hit him in the open and quickly loose the animal in thick cover in the bush . you need to hit him hard with a good sized bullet leave a good blood trail and not have the animal go far.

The 358 W does all of this in a short action.

Winchester is the only one loading a 200 gr bullet for this as fa as I know, but the reloader can load anything from the 180 to 250 gr 35 cal. bullet , using 358 W, brass or reforming brass from 308 W which is the parent case .
For informal plinking at the range or deer hunting for that matter the round goes do well with lead bullets.

Since the BLR has a box magazine you are not limited to blunt bullets required for the other levers.

This rifle chambering does not have the power of the whelan and for the most part to take advantage of what the round is capable of you need to reload. A good bullet will pass through a good sized bear and leave a good blood trail, vital when hunting over bait in heavy coverat last light . You want the aninal down quickly and not far from where you hit him.


Now of your seeking more range out of the BLR or want the powder of the whelan , you can still achieve this looking at the 300 WSM or the new 325WSM, chambered also in this rifle.

When I was going in to buy a rifler I was thinking of the 300 WSM , checked out a used 3006, then the 358 W just came in. Since I was a reloader and knew what it was ,the rifle never touched the gunshop bench . Had I placed an order for4 a new gun that day it would have been a toss up between the 358 W and the 300 WSM.
No regrets after two years , but then again we did not have the 325 WSM.


I bought it. :-D
 

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The recoil numbers really don't mean much. It's what you feel when you shoot the gun that matters.

For example, I've had muzzle loaders with those evil looking steel crescent buttplates. With the SAME LOAD they were punishment when shooting from a bench or prone, but *****-cats when shooting off-hand.

I have a brother who has a Rem. 7600 in .30-06, a Win. 70 in .300 WM, and a 12 gauge Mosseberg. He says the Rem. 7600 is the most punishing. Notice I didn't say which recoiled more because the truth is neither one of us knows - we just know that one gun is less pleasant than the others.

That's why I don't shy away from 10 lb guns. They soak up recoil.
 
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