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Have any of you noticed how the latest reloading manuals are reducing the loads for older calibers and milsurps? Specifically for the Swedish 6.5x55mm loads using IMR4320 powder and Hornady 140 gr.SP:

47th (1992 edition) Lymans Manual.....
IMR 4320 powder/ 140 grain Jacketed SP: 39.0gr. @2421fps to 43.0gr. @2645fps

13th(2001-latest edition) Speer Manual......
IMR 4320 powder/ 140 grain Spitz-SP: 36.5 [email protected] to 40.5gr. @2567fps

One Book/One Caliber (2000 edition)........
Sierra Bullets-IMR 4320 powder/140 grain Spitzer BT: 33.3 [email protected] to 40.4 [email protected]
Speer Bullets-IMR 4320 powder/140 grain Spitzer SP: 36.5gr. @2313fps to 40.5gr. @ 2567fps
IMR- IMR 4320 powder/140 gr. SIE SP: 37.5gr. @2465fps
Nosler Bullets- IMR 4320 powder/140 grain XFB: 35.0gr. @2514 to 39.0 gr. @2801fps

finally<Stevespage> 6.5x55mm Swedish....IMR 4320 powder/140gr. SP: 33.3gr. to 43.0gr.

Notice how the current manuals are down loading across the board? Is this because the great U.S. Courts are so ready to hand out huge monitary awards for liability cases???

Jim
 

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savageT,
It might be that litigitis has had some effect on the load manuals but it is just as likely that the measurement of chamber pressure has gotten better and some of the older "accepted" loads have been shown to produce more than SAAMI standards. Powders could be different enough today, having changed over the years, that they are faster in use today than they were years ago. With all the variables in reloading I assume that the manuals are more correct today - with some exceptions - than they have ever been. Don't assume you can use the data from older books without working the load up - I loaded a moderate (median) load from the new Speer manual for my 357 maximum and ran into sticking cases - Always work up loads when changing components - even powder lots.

PaulS
 

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Remember also that this cartridge was originally devloped over 100 years ago and many of the rifles chambered for it are showing their age. (Just as many loads for the 45-70 and the 30-30 are built around the lowest common denominator.)

MM
 

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Yes, Savage... I "hug" my Model 99 .300 Savage 'most EVERY day.

I've been reloading a long time and, "YES", I've noticed that as our society got more litigious and the ambulance-chasers become more numerous and more aggressive, the good folks who write the reloading manuals have become a great deal more cautious in what they seem willing to indicate are "maximum safe loads".

While some of it might be due to older firearms in questionable conditiion still possibly in use, I've noted that, in a great many cases, even so-called "modern" caliber's loads for which there are NO "older firearms" have been reduced as well.

Take the case-in-point concerning my .338 Winchester magnum... a caliber that didn't come out until 1958, so there are no "old rifles" made for that caliber.

I caught "major heck" from no less than Ken Waters, the well-known gun writer/wildcatter whose fine articles have appeared in Rifle Magazine and other well-known gun publications. Ken, who lives in New Canaan, CT., and I had been corresponding about my Savage Model 99 (he also owned one) when, in one of my letters, I happened to mention my hunting handload for my Model 70 Winchester in .338 Winchester magnum caliber. It is the same load I've been using since I bought the rifle brand new and began handloading... the same "load" I got the huge bull moose with in Canada... the same load published as a "maximum safe load" in the 45th. Edition (1970) of the Lyman Reloading Handbook.

In Ken's defense, I must say that later reloading handbooks had lowered the maximum safe load by 2 grains from the load published in 1970, but then... this year, the new Lyman Reloading Handbook just published is, again, indicating the old, heavier load as the "maximum safe load".

I believe this is a perfect example of how the companies who publish the reloading books are running scared because so many people refuse to take the responsibility of their own acts when they do something stupid... and these same people tend to call in a lawyer at the first sign of any controversy... especially if they think they can collect any money out of it.

However, quite frankly, the smart reloader "works up" his handloads slowly and carefully anyway, watching at all times for "high pressure signs". THIS is NOT a person whose going to blow up his rifle. To practice less caution is NOT conducive to a long life.

But then, some people just ain't the brightest bulb on the Christmas Tree... know what I mean? It's like the caution note on an electric tool that says, "Do not operate this tool when standing in a bathtub full of water"..................... DUHHH !~!~!
 
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