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Since this is one of the most active and helpful forums around I will ask my off-topic question. I want to start reloading, but to be honest I am totally confused by all the pieces, parts, gauges, bells, and whistles that seem to be involved. I don't want to pull you guys too far from handi business, so good links or short responses are ok. It just seems that all this eqipment needs this accessory, and that add-on part. what do I REALLY need to load for a .308 , .25-06, and 30/30? I feel like a blind man in a mirror store. :shock: :?
 

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I myself haven't started reloading yet either. But I plan too very soon, right now I have been reading up on a lot of info on the web. I believe buying a reloading kit outright with a couple good manuls is a good place to start. Then if you find something else you need to add to it, and I am guessing there will be a few small things you/we might have to, then pick them up. I got some really good suggestions on a few kits as of late :wink: and I believe I am going with the Hornady lock-and-load kit. Goes for around $220-250.
 

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Reloading

beckerhead,
Best to start off with a good basic kit.The Lee Anniversary kit served me very well to start.It has everyting you need to start.As time goes on and you become more accustomed to the hobby of reloading you will become aware of other pieces of equipment that will enhance your results.
But to start with use the KISS principle.KEEP IT SIMPLE & SAFE.
You'll find that reloading is really a joy and is a hobby within the hobby of guns and shooting.
You'll be very apprehensive and then proud of your first few loads.Hey,I can do this!!
Utilize the assistance of the fine people on the reloading section here on Graybeard and read everything you can in the reloading sections of this and other forums.If you have a question,put it to the more experienced people here.Remember there are no dumb questions,just unasked ones.
Much luck on your new chosen hobby.

Stan
 

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Beacker Head
The Lee anniversary Kit is a good kit to start out with.
You need to get a couple of good manuals and read them. They will answer many of your questions and keep reloading safe . You will also need the following with your kit.

Dies: I like RCBS and Lee I use neck dies for my handi rifles and bolt rifles. I use full lenght dies for my pump 06 and would also use it for lever action

Powder trickler: Many brands work, I like RCBS. This device lets you trickle powder on to your scale to make your loads very accurate.

Bullet Puller: Hope you never have to use one, but comes in handy if you ever make a mistake and have to pull a cartridge apart.

Reloading Blocks: Plastic or wood work for holding your rounds.

Case Trimmer : At some point you will have to trim cases. Many work, I use RCBS and some guys like Lee,Lyman ect.

Lube pad: For lubing your empty cases before running through the press. (the kit will come with lube)

Stainless Steel Caliper : It takes inside, outside and depth measurements of case.

Shell Holders for press: You will have shell holders for your priming tool that comes with the kit, but you will need shell holders for your press. I use RCBS.

Make your self or buy a good reloading bench.

Please read manuals very carefully before ever attempting reloading. If ever in doubt look it up and ask questions.

Norse
 

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Norseman112 said:
Powder trickler: Many brands work, I like RCBS.
Redding is good too, and on sale for $13.99 at Midway this month:
http://www.midwayusa.com/esearch.ex...lector=all_products&search_keywords=trickler+

Bullet Puller: Hope you never have to use one, but comes in handy if you ever make a mistake and have to pull a cartridge apart.
You can get by with a 2x4 with a hole drilled in it. Put a shellholder on the case to keep it from falling in the hole.
Shell Holders for press: You will have shell holders for your priming tool that comes with the kit, but you will need shell holders for your press. I use RCBS.
Good thing Lee dies come with shellholders.
 

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Except the RGB die sets, but at $10, what can you expect!

Tim
 

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Pick up a couple of reloading manuals and read, read, read..... then read some more. The Lyman and Richard Lee's 2nd edition are good manuals, as are all the rest, but these two are quite good for a beginning investment. The Lee Anniversary Kit is a very good beginning as well, but the so called "Perfect Powder Measure" is anything but perfect. A measure from Lyman or RCBS will be a far better investment. Lee dies work very, very well. Dies are like many things in life....you don't nessicarily get more by paying more.

Do not be decieved by the "reloading saves money" thinking. Won't happen. What will happen is that you will find that you shoot more for the same money, and if you get to be like a lot of us old farts around here, you'll find ways to shoot your centerfire rifles 50 times for about the same cost as a box of 22's these days. In fact, I quit shooting 22 rimfire years ago because I'd rather be shooting my cast bullet reloads.

Enjoy the journey!
 

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what do I REALLY need to load for a .308 , .25-06, and 30/30?

Here's 2 really simple questions for you...because what your asking will get a bunch of different answer's without your answers...

1).....How much can you spend up front...?

2).....How detailed..(involved)...do you want to start out ...or become??

The reasons I ask this...is namely...once you have a set figure your capable and willing to spend...then it is a-lot easier to fill in the blanks with the different equipment and to help you...

You will find a few different viewpoints on this..just as everyone has a paticular favorite car...so it is as well with reloading...you can buy cheap...or you can buy in the middle...or you can go all out and buy the top of the line...each of the different price brackets reflects the quality and amount of equipment you will get...and in turn...the different functions you can do in reloading...

You will also find some folks who say you don't have to spend a-lot to be a accomplished reloader...yep...this fact is true..but....as with any story...there is always the other side to look at...and .this is where my veiwpoints differ somewhat.....Once you make the commitment to become a accomplished Handloader .....you will commence spending a great deal more money...on higher priced-better made equipment...the kind of equipment that eases the amount of time you have to spend at the bench...or doing a certain task....the kind that produces better results..at the bench..and in your groups.....the kind of equipment that is built to last a lifetime..instead of replacing it every few years...or months...instead of having just 1 or 2 reloading manuals...you will want to have every current manual produced..so you can cross reference all the different bullets......you'll be looking at all those different accessories in a totally different light...because those of us that's been doing it...the other way.. for a lifetime...know just how much easier it is to have them and to use them properly...and wonder what we would do without them......and..with that... this brings me back to the 2 questions I ask you...I could ask you several more ...but those 2 will determine what type of equipment you can start out with.

Let me know..

Mac
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I can't really go over $300 (at one time) at all, and that is pushing it to be honest. How involved? I want to build better than what I buy, my .25-06 regularly shoots sub 1/4" with factory fodder, my .308 hovers around 1" even with UMC, as a matter of fact my best group with that rifle was shot with UMC 150's at a tidy 3/8", and my 30/30 well I can always stay within 2" and usually a little better, but I want to be able to use better bullets than most factory loads have, since hogs are on my menu, maybe a barnes, or nosler partition? So basically I want to be able to build more consistent loads for the bench, and better hammers for the beasts of the earth.
 

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beckerhead said:
I can't really go over $300 (at one time) at all, and that is pushing it to be honest. How involved? I want to build better than what I buy, my .25-06 regularly shoots sub 1/4" with factory fodder, my .308 hovers around 1" even with UMC, as a matter of fact my best group with that rifle was shot with UMC 150's at a tidy 3/8", and my 30/30 well I can always stay within 2" and usually a little better, but I want to be able to use better bullets than most factory loads have, since hogs are on my menu, maybe a barnes, or nosler partition? So basically I want to be able to build more consistent loads for the bench, and better hammers for the beasts of the earth.
This makes it a lot simpler..there are 2 kits I would recommend to get...
1) Hornady Lock and Load classic...

2) Lyman Orange Crusher Expert kit...

There are differences in the 2 and simalarities...as for what you get...some of the trade offs come in ease of usage...with the Lock and Load bushings..also...the Lyman kit comes with a case trimmer...which is a nice one...not great...but nice...and will work ...with the Hornady you will have to get a trimmer...there are various ones on the market from the little lee hand trimmer...up to the electric type..all of them will work..but again..ease of usage and your time will dictate what you need..

For your $300 dollars...if you are wanting to include all your dies...you won't be getting the very best dies out there..yes..you can get some pretty cheap Lee dies sets...but..they are not my choice of dies for several reasons...my choice of dies are as follows..

1) Forster....

2) Redding

3) RCBS

4) Hornady

These dies give me the consistancy I expect from my reloads...and of late have come to only use Redding and Forster...they aren't cheap...but most quality products aren't...Both RCBS and Hornady...will for a fee cut a fully custom die for your chambers..all you have to do..is send them a few fired cases...

Case priming is usually done best by hand...so you can have a better feel of the primer seating...Lee makes a good one...as does RCBS...and the others...$15.00 up...this is one item I do advise you to get..

Next up is manuals...they aren't cheap either...if you only use 1 type of bullet...start with that manufactures reloading manual...then expand it out to emcompass all of them as money permits...the Hornady kit comes with their 2 book set...Lymans has their reference...I would suggest the Nosler #5...The Sierra #5...The Lyman #48 ...and the Speer #13...in that order...these have a ton of information and helpful hints and tons of loading data for you to use..Another one to find at a-lot of news stands...is the Hodgdons Annual magazine...if you use their powders...you'll certainly want to look through it ...

Mac
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Mac, thanks for the feedback. I am really trying to figure all this out, I am known to deliberate and compare things to death, so you can imagine something with this many variables. I have spent the past 2 months reading every review I can find about Mueller scopes, and I know in my heart they have to be pretty darn good, but my head needs to feed on sick amounts of data in order to make the buy. I like the Hornady stuff, I have their catalog at home, and have been in it all week. Where is the best place to order this stuff? I know that Natchez has been ripped by people here, but I don't know the details, I have used them for years with no problems at all??? what about Midway? Dang, I get wordy quick, anyhow, I have about 120 cases fired from my gun, I read about just "neck sizing"?? your fired brass for better efficiency? what is all that? Sorry for the bother :oops:
 

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I would compare prices including shipping for the equipment you ultimately decide on. Midway, Cabelas, Midsouth, Natchez and Grafs all have fairly competitive prices, but when you consider the shipping too, sometimes paying just a bit more for the item will justify paying a lot less for shipping. For example, I recently ordered 500 rem 405gr .458" bullets, Cabela's price was $1 more per 500 than Midway, but the total order cost from Cabelas was $71 compared to $84 from Midway due to Midway's high shipping.

The issue with Natchez is they won't sell to customers in certain states due to tax laws, so some feel that Natchez should be boycotted.

Tim

www.midsouthshooterssupply.com

www.midwayusa.com

www.natchezss.com

www.grafs.com

www.cabelas.com
 

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I'm going to give you a phone number...it's to someone that can help you a-lot...he is one of the better C/S techs at Redding...his name is Bruce Merkur...he is an older gentleman...who is one of the most knowledgable techs Redding has...here's his number...1-607-753-3331...give him a call ...

Here's another number..1-800-223-8799....this is to the Sierra Ballistic Technicians...you can get a tremendous amount of imformation from both ...


These are some great reference numbers to call...Sierra...has a couple video's that will walk you from beginning to that of compition reloading...they are very good..and you can actually watch how to do it...if you don't have someone in your area to help out.Also..you can check with your local conservation office...they might have reloading classes available...because it sounds to me you actuallly need to see how to do this...instead of reading about it...and that's ok...just remember...everyone is nervous about it when starting out...you just have to take it slow and deliberate...never be in a hurry...or rushed...or get distracted...it's not always easy to accomplish this...but it will help you more than you know..

Mac
 
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