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Just bought a clearance-priced ADL. What would it take to change it from its current .30-06 to a .35 Whelen?
 

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Expensive!

New barrel in .35 Whelen (at least $200 for a quality barrel).

Blue the barrel if it doesn't come blued (approx. $60).

Gunsmith charge to install the new barrel ($120 to $180).

Install iron sights on the new barrel (if you like having iron sights) ($40 to $60). Hope the gunsmith has a long jig extension for drilling the holes in your barrel. Lots of them just "eye-ball" it, and I have seen some front sights that are badly canted one way or another.

Then, hope you don't have any follow up problems from the installation, like a tight chamber, or feeding problems, or a host of other things that happen whenever you rebarrel.

You are much much better off finding a used .35 Whelen in very good condition at a gunshow and buying it. This will save you lots of time, money and headache. If you find one, then the seller will probably accept your .30-06 in trade, and you may only be out another $100 to $150 or so.
Most gunsmiths will give you this same advice.

If you spend all of the money to rebarrel, then counting the original cost of your rifle, you will probably have $750 to $800 invested in the rifle, . . . .and you won't be able to sell it for $300.
 

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I just had a 700 rebarreled to .35 Whelen. The out the door cost at ER Shaw was around $350 for a stainless barrel, fitted and test-fired, bead blasted and locking lugs lapped.

If you want a Whelen you can also order a remington bolt or pump from Grice.

Big Paulie is right about a low resale value. It wasn't a consideration in my case, but it may be in yours.

John
 

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Can't you find a smith to rechamber the existing barrel? The .35 Whelen is a .30-06 necked up to the bigger bullet.
It's not just a simple rechamber. It's a rebore and rechamber. In such cases it's really best to start with a chamber some what smaller than it will end up. Otherwise the smith will likely need to set it back a thread or two and that might result in an improperly bedded rifle. A rebarrel job is the easiest way to go if the rifle is to be converted.
 

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Reboring is usually about as expensive as rebarreling. I would definetly rebarrel the remington.. If a 35 Whelen can be found as a factory rifle it will likely be cheaper..
 

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Last year I had a local gunsmith rebarrel my old -06 to .35whelen for $250 out the door.
That included a new barrel, reblueing the action and barrel, chamber work, test firing, and some trigger work. Unfortunately, once this project was under way, Remington came out with their new model chamber in .35 whelen. So it can be done relatively inexpensive. Just check around with your local gunsmiths. :grin:
 

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See if Midway has any Adams and Bennet 35 Whelen barrels left. They were around $70, don't remember if they were short chambered or what. Of course a new Shilen Chrome moly tube is only about $135 or so and you know you'll get a good one there. Figure about $250 - 300 to barrel it up with a bead blasted finish and you're in business. Or like everybody says, find a 700 CDL or Classic in 35 whelen and do it that way. You just never know if you'll get a decent barrel that way, but it'll be cheaper.
 

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I just had ER shaw rebarrel a win 70 to 35 whelen from 06 cost was 310 dollars shipped to my door. I was really impressed with the job they did. I would check them out.
 
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