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Discussion Starter #1
I've got a Rem 700 LSS in 270 winchester and would like to switch it over to a 7mm STW. What all would it take to convert over to the STW and the approximate cost. I just want something that will shoot 1MOA don't need a sub 1/4" benchrest rifle. :)
 

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It would be better if you started with one in 7mm Rem Mag, that way it's just a simple rechamber job. But if you want to start with a .270, you'll either need to have the bolt opened up with a Sako extractor installed, or a new bolt with a magnum face. You will then need a barrel installed. I don't know what others charge, but all this would run about $700 out the door at my shop. Currently the local Wal-Mart is selling 7mm mag 700 ADL rifles for $325, and I would get about $75 for the rechamber. Lots of ways to go, depending on how you want to get there. Of course the main question to ask is what do you hope to gain by going from a 270 to a 7mm STW? You'll have much more blast, recoil, cost to shoot, etc. You gain lots of energy, shooting 160gr. bullets instead of 120gr. at roughly the same speed. Is it what is needed? Not trying to slam anybody for their choices, but it's important to look at the whole picture as well. BTW, I build a LOT of 7mm STW rifles that folks are really happy with, but wouldn't want such a thing myself because I have no need for one.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hum quite a bit of work and alot more than what I paid for the rifle to begin with. I'm just mainly looking for a long range thumper that is different than what I currently have, already have a 270 but couldn't pass up the deal on the LSS in 270. Would mainly be taking long range shots on hogs with a slightly bigger bullet. Maybe I will find a steal someday on a 7mm mag and get it rechambered to the stw if the brass is still available by then. The only other caliber I have any interest in is the 260 rem and/or 6.5x55 but that would put me in the same situation as the stw. Anyway thanks for your reply. :-\
 

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Now 260 or 6.5x55 is a different animal - they work great in a Rem long action standard bolt face. The 260 just takes a rebarrel, the Swede takes a little bolt face work but nothing that 5 minutes with a grinder won't do. They both work great, and as a matter of fact I use a 260 in a long Remington for highpower silhouette. My reamer has .220" of freebore, so I can seat a 140 Amax to the neck/shoulder junction. A round loaded like this won't fit in a short action, but it's really slick in a long one. With the extra 5 grains of powder capacity over a regular chambered 260, I can come very close to the performance of a 6.5-284 with it and accuracy is terrific.
 

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I have a 6.5x55 in the M70 classic featherweight and loaded to like pressures it's greater capacity produces more velocity than a 260. And all with a standard chamber! The little Swede is a fine deer round! For more velocity with these bullets I like the 264 Win..
 

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I have had a 7mm STW since the wildcat was started. My first was on a Weatherby action which was previously a 7mm Weatherby. Without the long throat of the Weatherby cartridge it was much easier to develop accurate loads. I gave this rifle to my son a few years ago after having a second 7mm STW built. The second and my current one is a 700 Remington which was originally in 7mm Rem Mag. Shilen put a 26-inch stainless light-varmint weight barrel on it and I put on a Brown-Precision fiberglass stock and added a high removable cheekpiece and a Leupold 3.5-10X 50mm scope. If one is shooting game the size of whitetail deer I think 140-grain bullets are ideal. They have plenty of energy to over 500 yards and can be driven at 3,500 fps. Mine shoots 140-grain Nosler Balistic Tips at 3,550 and I zero it for 300 yards. Maximum bullet rise up to 300 yards is about 2.7 inches and drop at 400 yards is about 7 inches. One can hold "dead on" to 350 yards. One may say "What's the big advantage of an extra 50 yards of flat trajectory?" My theory is that 350 yards is only 17 percent farther than 300 yards, but there is 36 percent more land within a 350-yard circle than within a 300-yard circle. My advice would be to use a really good quality, smooth barrel or you may get a lot of copper fouling.
 
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