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Discussion Starter #1
Have a Rem. model 7 in .308 I bought new in 1986. How can I convert it to a .243. Just buy a new barrel from Rem. ? If so would I be better off going to a 7mm-08 ? My goal is reduced recoil. Oh yeah I hunt deer with the rifle. Little deer in Fla.
 

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I would first try the factory "Recoil Management" Loads before I disassembled a fine rifle. They work perfectly in my 7 mag. 1/2 the recoil, roughly same POI at close range. And I still have a 7 mag for when I might want to hunt long range.

Second, I would buy a used .243 before I rebarreled a fine rifle. And new Steven 200's are $249 right now in Houston. I imagine you could spend close to that rebarreling and only have 1 rifle!

Third, (if you don't follow one of the paths above) I would try and buy a barrel from one of the better known barrel makers in a 22-23" before I put another 20" Remington Factory barrel on. My model 7 shoots well, but I prefer a longer, heavier barrel for shooting accuracy and reduced blast, noise.


2 cents from a fellow deer hunter, not a gun expert.

pepaw
 

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Have you tried having the mod 7 fitted with a limbsaver recoil pad? (or other good pad) 308, 7mm/08, and 243 all use the same case, so using lighter bullets is probably the only thing that will make a difference in the felt recoil. My guess is that a 139 grain 7mm and a 140 grain .308 would be basically the same.

I think the recoil pad would be the most cost effective fix, and there are always the mercury filled tubes that most say work well. Probably a lot cheaper than a rebarrel. The .308 is not known as a hard kicker, but on a light compact rifle like my wifes Ruger 77 ultra light in .243, she could feel it........I had a limbsaver installed for her, and she's back in love with the rifle.

I agree with Peepaw, I'd look for another rifle and sell that one if I couldn't get the felt recoil down where I wanted it.
 

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I believe the cheapest option would be to leave it as a .308 and either use the lower recoil factory loads from Federal or Remington or to reload some lighter loads if you're a reloader.

If you don't like those options then I think if you return it to Remington they would likely put a new barrel in your choice of .243, .260 Rem. or 7-08 on it. The factory 120 grain loads for the .260 and 7-08 would reduce recoil some but not as much as the .243 will. BUT are better game killers.


Do you reload or know someone who might reload some light loads for you?

If not you might find it cheaper to just trade rifles for a Model 7 in .243 unless that particular rifle has sentimental value to you.
 

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I'd say go to low recoil loads. If you don't reload it's a great reason to start. Your old friend says the same and you've got a hobby. If you do reload you've already got the money invested in reloading equipment.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the great advice guys. I think I'm gonna keep the .308 mainly because it is reliable and accurate and rebarreling (is that a word ?) sounds pretty drastic. Any how now I have an excuse to buy a new rifle and keep ol' reliable. Not to change the subject but maybe somebody needs to open up a topic on "How to keep firearm purchases a secret from the wife". Thanks again.
 
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