Graybeard Outdoors banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Lyman combo primer tool that has large and small primer crimp reamers, a VLD chamfering tool, and a neck deburring tool. I used the small reamer on some 5.56 brass. I started priming cases and ran into some that still had too much of the crimp left. I remembered reading on a forum a guy just used his chamfering tool to remove primer crimps. I didn't have any other tools to try so I used my VLD head and it did the trick.
What do others use to remove the crimps? I'm looking at the RCBS swaging die set. Any input will be appreciated.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,016 Posts
i made a trade here, for some 308 brass with crimped primers.. i used my lee chamfer tool to remove the crimp

if i was removing a whole lot of crimps or doing so on a regular basis, id get the rcbs swaging set
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,510 Posts
i used to have an rcbs swager for use with
military once fireds. then the ar's got real popular
and commercial cases got cheap and plentiful.
then all the shooting messes and brass got
scarce again, and so on. . . .
i have enough now i'll likely never have to re-work
any military, but if i were to i'd likely get another swager.
one pass and it's done
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,611 Posts
I have a RCBS tool. I recently went through every piece of brass I own and tossed out all the military pieces. I once sized a bunch of 30-06 down to 25-06 and they were my most frequent problems, and the only caliber I necked down.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,755 Posts
I solved my problem by throwing my crimped primer brass in a large box and loading only commercial brass. Yep, I'm lazy, and I've picked up enough commercial brass on the concrete at the range to last a while. Then I might look back at the crimped primers....

Ben
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
787 Posts
Lifelong machinist/mechanic here, and when I first encountered primer crimps, I immediately thought of a countersink. I had a few in my toolbox and grabbed a 60 degree tool and have never had a need for any other tool for that job. 20 years later and a few thousand crimps removed, it still works great...
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
2,656 Posts
I used to try an avoid military brass for this reason. But, I ended up with so much 5.56 and .308 brass that it just made sense to use it. The hand held method with a hand tool works, but can be a little inconsistent, and hard on the fingers. I bought an RCBS bench primer swaging tool, and it works great. Just the thing when you have a 5 gallon bucket of brass to do. RCBS also makes a primer swaging set that fits in your single stage press for a little less $$ than the bench tool.

Larry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,534 Posts
I use the Dillon "Super Swage 600" tool, IMHO the best tool to use. I've used it for all my military brass, definitely worth the money.

Here's a video of it in action:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jGzKShy2tYk

It is a little pricey, but I bought mind back in 1984, and it's still going strong. Dillon has a life time guarantee on the product, not the buyer/person, so if you buy a used one, the guarantee is still good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,461 Posts
I'm with mdi on this. Ended up with over 1000 rds. of LC brass a short time back. All once fired. My 2 boys love to shoot their AR's. After I run them thru a Dillion carbide sizer,(still use Imperial sizing die wax thou), they'll take turns with the variable speed drill, do couple hundred rounds each, removing crimps, and then the rest is up to me. Saves my fingers from curling up from old Arthur, if ya know what I mean. gypsyman
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,611 Posts
OldSchoolRanger said:
I use the Dillon "Super Swage 600" tool, IMHO the best tool to use. I've used it for all my military brass, definitely worth the money.

Here's a video of it in action:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jGzKShy2tYk

It is a little pricey, but I bought mind back in 1984, and it's still going strong. Dillon has a life time guarantee on the product, not the buyer/person, so if you buy a used one, the guarantee is still good.
I agree 100%!!!

I also have the RCBS for a single stage and it works but is slower than the Dillon. The Dillon is fast adjustable and efficient. I can do 100 cases in just a few minutes.

Reaming if don't correctly is fine, but using s knife or "space ship" debuting tool can EASILLY remove too much material and leav the primer with less support seriously refusing the brass life. Swadgeing is the way to go if you intend on getting full life from your brass.

I think we all know LC mil brass is quality stuff and excellent for reloading. I especially like it for case forming because it doesn't carry a case head designation. So one needs to know and look at what they have.

CW
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
24,004 Posts
another vote for the Dillon. If you have a lot of brass or will in the future. Its well worth the price.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,475 Posts
Frank - You talking about the Dillon?

I used the RCBS for the single stage for decades but decided to spend $100 for the Dillon once the AR got going. The RCBS sometimes was very slow when it didn't want to align the case, which was probably my doing but I could never figure out how to align everything perfect every time. The Dillon is much faster and I wish I'd spent the money decades ago because I don't think you will find better. To be fair, I haven't tried the other bench mounted systems, so some may be just as good but they probably won't be faster or better.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,500 Posts
I have reamers, the rcbs swage tool but have bought the ch4d press swage kit. I have yet to try it but looks very smooth. It works like a ram prime with a shell holder. Has anyone here used this kit?

Sent from my SM-G920R7 using Tapatalk
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top