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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking for some advice on a rest when hunting with my .460. I'm good out to at least 100 yards shooting from a bench and rest, but I really don't have the ability to drag that all down to my ground blind. What should I use? A monopod? A bipod? Something else? Any advice would be great. Thanks!
 

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I use a bi-pod. I rest the chin of the revolver on the Y of the bi-pod. I use the Stony Point ones that can be adjusted from sitting to standing. When I am walking thought the woods I extend them and they are used as walking sticks as well as a shooting rest.
 

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I use one of the "pole cat" mono-pods. They're pretty solid, and you can really adjust them just right for your needs. Never tried those shock-corded sticks, but either would serve as a good rest. I think the cost on mine was @ $25-$30 at Cabelas. Money well spent if you do a lot of still hunting on the ground, and makes a good hiking stick/snake poker as well.
 

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So which one is better? I would think that I could be a bit more steady with a bi-pod, but I like the idea of a mono-pod. BTW where is the "chin" of the revolver? Is it right in front of the trigger guard?
 

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Yes right in front of the trigger guard.

My bi-pod can be used as a walking stick also, the two legs come together, I never really liked the mono-pod, not as steady, but better than nothing.
 

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Well I ordered the Stoney Point Polecat bi-pod measuring 25"-62". I'll be using it nest weekend to hopefully harvest three deer. I'm pretty pumped!
 

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I must have some hill-billy in me. After shopping for shooting sticks, I walked back into the woods and cut a couple straight 1"-2" saplings and lashed them together with duck decoy line. They work great and if I lay them down and forget them, so what? Just cut a notch and start the lashings with a good clove hitch. For what it's worth....

Sean
 

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After shopping for shooting sticks, I walked back into the woods and cut a couple straight 1"-2" saplings and lashed them together with duck decoy line.
We must be related; I made mine from straight willow branches and put them together with parachute cord through holes I drilled in them.

I much prefer bipods over monopods or tripods by the way. The monopod doesn't provide adequate lateral or forward/backward stability. As for the tripod, you are always going to have a little barrel movement. With a tripod, barrel movement has to be from side to side unlike a bipod where the barrel movement will be more backwards and forwards; the latter will have less of a negative effect on accuracy in my opinion.
 

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I guess I'm not the only one who when I'm out in the woods looks for a couple of downed branches to lash together
with strips of raw hide(old boot laces) that I keep attached to my bandoleer holster to create a bipod shooting stick. I
keep it in the bed of my pickup and use it throughout gun season and also the late smokepole season. I prefer these
homemade ones to my stoney point steady stix. ;D
 

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Certainly don't mean to question anyones methods , to each his own , .....I've found a straight stick ( mono pod ? ) works best for me. With most store bought rests they allow you to rest on top or in the "v" or some variation of that. Seems like Mr. or Mrs. deer always manages to show up in a dip, ravine or hillside or whathave you, making the height of the sticks unusable . By using just a straight stick you can adjust the height simply by sliding the left hand up or down the stick, then resting the weapon on my left wrist. (for right hand shooters ) Obviously I shoot a contender.....a revolver my burn ya unless you rest it from the grips. Most deer I've encountered won't give ya enough time to set up a bi or tripod. Course my method is not nearly as wobble free as afore mentioned devices, but a lot better than off hand. Now maybe if ya hunt from a blind with everything setup........only mho Sorry, after rereading the originally post, you did say about hunting from a ground blind....gonna leave this post anyway, it may help those of us that still-hunt.
 

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Here in Texas we use ground and elevated blinds and they all have walls made from solid material (i.e. plywood). So I found a small sand bag rest made by Caldwell. The thing weighs a little more than a pound and packs nicely. It has the "v" notch to rest your gun, but also has weighted flaps sewn on either side to allow it to straddle the wall of the blind. It is solid and allows for a variety of shooting angles.

When I walk I utilize a mono pod. It works, but in hindsight a bi-pd would have probably been better. Fortunately I spend most of my time in a blind.
 
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