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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Started putting a garden again for the last couple years.
Always plant everything in the same spot.
So far they all are still producing good .
Was just wondering if I rotated the plants (tomato and peppers) if it would make any differance.
What's you all ideas on rotating plants?
 

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We change the locations every other year or so, This helps lessens soil mineral depletion as different lants require different mineral and nutrient percentages. we also plant the same types of plants in different areas of the garden instead of just a full row of Tomatoes then a full row of peppers we intersperse tomatoes and peppers together as an example, that way disease or insects that may attack one type of tomato plant will have a much harder time traveling to other areas in the garden where the same plants are growing, We also use different varieties of tomatoes , cukes, peppers , garlic etc.. IE: we mix our big boy tomatoes in with early girls , or champions. this helps us have tomatoes all season long as they reach maturity at different times in the season.

- This approach seems to work for us
 

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To solve this I just run my rows different every year. First year is North to South. Next year is East to West. Taller things get planted farthest from the sun, along with cool weather stuff in their shade to get 3 or 4 more weeks out of them. Works out good and I plant a crop of turnips or collards in the Fall to till under in the Spring. Haven't had any trouble with deficiencies.

You may search for companion planting on the internet. That helps as well. For instance I plant my beans like the old timers did. Sew a climbing bean seed next to corn 4 weeks after the corn is planted. The beans produce nitrogen. Feeds the corn so you don't have to apply as much fertilizer.
 

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Arier ,
I like your Bean approach, I will try this next year.
 

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Always rotate, many diseases and bugs that infest a particular crop (tomato hornworm is one such) will be present in the soil, and just infect the new crop coming in. Also, like has been stated, lessens soil depletion if you rotate, especially nitrogen loads in the soil. Always follow a nitrogen producer with a nitrogen user...
 

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One other thing, remember that some plants, such as tomatoes, and peppers, are related, both nightshades, and can share diseases, as can cucurbits, or vine crops, such as cucumbers, and melons. Rotation should have non-similar crops included.
 
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