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I am sure this has been covered a thousand times. I am getting ready to do a trigger job on a new ruger I just bought. Do you guys float the barrels on your rugers? Thanks in advance.
 

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Some people claim to have better results with a pressure point, but I've floated the barrel on dozens of 77 MK-II's, and also 77 22's, and 77 22 Hornets. In every single case, I've seen an improvement in accuracy. In several cases I've seen horrible groups shrink to extremely tight groups with no other modifications other than the barrel floating. These rifles seem to benefit from free floating, and bedding the action more than any other design I've ever worked with.

As always though, shoot it first. I've also seen 77's that shot real good right out of the box.
 

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I have floated two of my 3 and seen a very nice improvement in accuracy. One is an MKII 30/06 the other was a 77/22 Hornet. The Hornet really came alive after a trigger and floating the barrel. The one I have not floated is a MKII 7mm Rem Mag, it shoots fantastic as is with the stock wrapped around the barrel.
 

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On my Rugers with light barrels I find they shoot better with the pressure point. The M77VT's with a heavy barrel are free floated.
Shoot your rifle first... does it need help? You can shim the stock to see if it would shoot better free floated... most that I have seen will not.
 

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I have one VT (factory floated), 3 M77's and 1 M77 MKII. First thing I do is float the barrel.

Floating the barrel may or may not improve accuracy. What it WILL do is eliminate changes in point of impact due to the stock warping slightly due to changes in temperature and/or humidity.

When I got my first bolt gun I couldn't figure out why the longer I shot it the more the group moved up and to the left even though I was trying to keep the barrel reasonably cool. The cause was barrel heat expanding the wood at the pressure point at the stocks tip. Never had the problem since I started floating the barrel.
 

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I float the barrels. Not for accuracy, but for consistency. I get trigger jobs for accuracy as the help me shoot better! All you have to do on the ruger to float the barrel is sand the pressure point down flush with the rest of the stock. Then take a small piece of plastic or rubber, something thin that wont change with moisture or temp and put it under the front lug. Cut a whole in it for the lug screw and tighten down. The reason for this is plastic have a tendency when to sing further and further in the stock while your tring to float them.
 
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