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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I seen a show about the tokarev and they said the reliability problems were mainly because of lack of training with this new rifle. Though some were the design of the rifle too. But most were because of lack of proper maintenance and education on semi-auto rifle. I guess most were used to bolt actions and had no clue of semi auto's plus the loading of rimmed cases properly in the magazine mattered too. It is a very interesting weapon and if you can find one that is priced reasonable i would grab it for sure. My first one didn't fuction because of the gas valve not being set right the scribed lines must match up for the valve to pass gas and cycle the gun properly. I noticed that my gun was rearsenaled and was never shot it had no marks on the slide from wear of the cases being loaded into the chamber(cycling). After readjusting the valve properly it shoots and cycles fine. And with the abundance of cheap surplus 7.62x54 ammo its an affordable shooter now too. BigBill

Its also official now I'm retired at "52" all done with the 9 to 5 thing all I have to do now is fish/hunt/plink thats my life from now on well sleep too. Plus browse the local shops for treasures too!!!!!
 

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Retired At 52 !!!!

You are a fortunate man indeed !!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes I am very lucky to in the position I am in. BigBill

I have the time, the ammo, and the use the range free card so I am blessed!!!!!! Now if I had someone to carry the target out to 100yds i'd be all set. I can't walk too well.
 

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BigBill:

You might remember an earlier post of mine about a rifle I have that is a sporter in .303 British based on a modified SVT 40.

It sounds like you've "taken down" your rifle - at least to some degree.

On my rifle the wooden cover over the gas piston was removed, and replaced by the metal - perforated - cover that is normally located ahead of the piston cover. This cover was modified and bent in some way I can't figure out, and I haven't been able to remove it yet.

The approach I'm hoping to take is to remove the stock, and (hopefully) allow the metal cover to come free. As I understand it, I have to remove the trigger group in order to get the stock to come out of the wood. My current problem is how to remove the stock cross bolt (just forward of the magazine). It appears that there is a Tokarev tool for doing this, but I've been wondering if there's some other tool or source of a tool that can do this job. Have you taken out this bolt, and - if so - what did you use?

I'm a little afraid to "go at it" with a pair of pliers unless I have no alternatives.

Thanks!
Rick
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I haven't taken the gun out of the stock yet I just did an in the stock good cleaning and lubed it with moly anti-seize on both my tokarev's. I plan on hammering one to see if it ever fails. When Chinese sks's first came out they all said they were crap and wouldn't last well I have one from the very beginning and i just can't kill it and its out lasting the ever ready bunnie!! The main thing with a semi is dirt and not keeping it clean and lubed properly. Do a search for svt-40 Tokarev and their is a site for them with all the information I think it comes apart without removing the center stock bolt all my military semi-auto's the stock bolt stays in when the top reciever comes up and the trigger group comes out the bottom.
BigBill
 

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There are complete take down instructions on the Tokarev with pictures at www.mosin-nagant.net . Those instructions include taking out the bolt to remove the stock, however, they use a specifically designed tool, and don't go into a lot of detail on this aspect.

These rifles are a lot like the SKS, but there are several differences - this seeming to be one. I'm guessing that Simonov learned from Tokarev. :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I take out the stock center bolt use anti seize when you reassembly it this way it will stay free to take apart again. Just becareful when tightening it the anti seize tends to make us over tighten stuff because its so easy to tighten. Like I said these parts are tough to get I know someone selling the svt on the net missing a center bolt "nut". BigBill
 
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