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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Greetings,
Well, last winter I started pondering a better load for my 3.2" bore. Steel balls are great (hard to find 'em after the shot) but I just love to tinker around with stuff. I've made a few test rounds that I elevated to 600' then dropped sideways. At a 2deg pitch they landed point first and stabilized about half way down. At 3deg pitch they really straighten out quickly, so my thought is to stay with 3 degrees. After all, if they will stabilize sideways then fired in line they should do just fine. They are approximately 9" long, 1.25" dia with 3 each 7/8" vanes set on 3 degrees.

The wood is just to proof out the machining fixtures, I'll go to a UHMW sabot for better pressure sealing like I have for the 3" steel balls. The darts also can be drilled out for tracer loads later in the year.

Anyone here have any experience in shooting these sort of projectiles? If so, I'm really interested in how you're measuring the velocity. The radar unit seems to be very confused by the separated sabot sections. I could go back to the old steel plate pendulum principal if necessary. More math!

Thanks for reading, and your suggestions.
Gos
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Is there a restriction on what type of non explosive projectiles can be fired from a muzzle loaded cannon?
 

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Greetings,
Well, last winter I started pondering a better load for my 3.2" bore. Steel balls are great (hard to find 'em after the shot) but I just love to tinker around with stuff. I've made a few test rounds that I elevated to 600' then dropped sideways. At a 2deg pitch they landed point first and stabilized about half way down. At 3deg pitch they really straighten out quickly, so my thought is to stay with 3 degrees. After all, if they will stabilize sideways then fired in line they should do just fine. They are approximately 9" long, 1.25" dia with 3 each 7/8" vanes set on 3 degrees.

The wood is just to proof out the machining fixtures, I'll go to a UHMW sabot for better pressure sealing like I have for the 3" steel balls. The darts also can be drilled out for tracer loads later in the year.

Anyone here have any experience in shooting these sort of projectiles? If so, I'm really interested in how you're measuring the velocity. The radar unit seems to be very confused by the separated sabot sections. I could go back to the old steel plate pendulum principal if necessary. More math!

Thanks for reading, and your suggestions.
Gos
If you can find a high speed camera with 1000 frames per second , like the Casio EX-FH100 , it is a simple mater to count the video frames from firing to impact for the velocity. It is fairly accurate. Your projectile nose shape is more suited to hyper velocities then what you are likely to obtain with just black powder.
 

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If you can find a high speed camera with 1000 frames per second , like the Casio EX-FH100 , it is a simple mater to count the video frames from firing to impact for the velocity. It is fairly accurate. Your projectile nose shape is more suited to hyper velocities then what you are likely to obtain with just black powder.
Please explain your 3deg pitch, not sure what you mean.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The vanes are welded 3 degrees off of axis to induce rotational spin. Like an arrow fletching, or a sabot dart. The first testing was done a 1 degree. It failed to stabilize the projectile when it was dropped. 2 degrees imparted a reasonable amount of spin, but it took a while for it to align up. 3 degrees seems to straighten it out fairly quickly when dropped on edge, so the theory is it will stay stabilized and not tumble if shot out of a cannon. I'm looking for accuracy out of a smooth bore rather than hand rifle it. None of these variants have been fired, hence my question on anyone else's experience with sabot rounds.
 

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The vanes are welded 3 degrees off of axis to induce rotational spin. Like an arrow fletching, or a sabot dart. The first testing was done a 1 degree. It failed to stabilize the projectile when it was dropped. 2 degrees imparted a reasonable amount of spin, but it took a while for it to align up. 3 degrees seems to straighten it out fairly quickly when dropped on edge, so the theory is it will stay stabilized and not tumble if shot out of a cannon. I'm looking for accuracy out of a smooth bore rather than hand rifle it. None of these variants have been fired, hence my question on anyone else's experience with sabot rounds.
You just might be in new territory for here , so by all means try one out
 

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This board is about Antique cannons and mortars, made in or before 1898 with specific exceptions, has been for 18 years.

Tell us about your cannon and perhaps we can help you achieve your goal. What your a doing looks pretty interesting.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
This board is about Antique cannons and mortars, made in or before 1898 with specific exceptions, has been for 18 years.
DD. My apologizes. I don't own a cannon under 10 years old, so I'm way out of line here regarding the age requirements. Please go ahead and just delete my post. Again my apologizes.
 

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Most of our cannon are not a century or more in age, they just follow the designs of pre-1898 to comply with federal law. They are typically muzzleloaders but there are a few breechloaders of pre-1898 design also. As long as you are not using fixed ammunition (primer, charge and projectile in one package), you're pretty much OK.
 

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Looks cool I've used sabots before ,
but nothing like that !

Is the dart held in place by friction ?
 
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