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I often hear about Savage's out-of-the-box accuracy, but one thing I never hear about is the quality/dependability of Savage actions. I literally don't hear anything, good or bad.

How does a Savage bolt action compare to Mausers?

Are Savage actions reliable under the worst conditions?

Are they noteably strong? Or are they middle of the road. Ruger handguns have a reputation for being exceedingly strong often warranting "Ruger Only" sections in reloading manuals.

And I guess this is a little trivial but, why did Savage switch to round-round receiver tops? If there isn't a clear advantage all it does is confuse the aftermarket items such as peep sight and scope rings.
 

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The action is strong enough to be chambered in calibers like 300WM, 338WM and was chambered in 300RUM a couple years ago. It's a strong action and I have bought some of their rifles, but I'm not one of those guys who is going to overload his handloads either. Follow the loads that are in the books for safety sake.

I've never heard of a savage failing to feed. You just have to make sure you bring the bolt all the way back just like any other rifle before you try to feed another round.

As far as the worst conditions, get the stainless models if you're going to be out in the rain. No matter who makes it, blueing wears off and light surface rust can start in when metal gets wet.

I don't know why they switched to a round receiver but there are plenty of aftermarket parts for both. I use dednutz scope mounts & rings and I think they can accommodate anything.

Don't be worried about buying a Savage. I have bought several and they all perform well. They are as accurate of a rifle gets out of the box and they're priced lower than the rest. You get more than what you pay for with a Savage!
 

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I have a Savage 110CL. I bought it new around 1970 and have had a fair amount of experience with it. The action is as smooth as my Remington 722 action, which is very slick. And smoother then my Remington 700 action, which is not bad.

Over the Chrony with the same load on the same day the barrel on the 110 has proved itself to be 30f.p.s. faster. And it is slightly more accurate then the Remington 700.

I also prefer the Savage safety to the Remington safety. The Savage safety is recessed behind the bolt and is easily accessible from the right or left side. (I shoot both right and left-handed.) I have never had the Savage safety rub-off. In turn I have had both the Ruger 77 and the Remington 700, 722, and 788 rub off when carried by a sling on the left side. The tang safety on the old Ruger 77 sets up and is exposed.

Feed and extraction has always been positive. In 2007 I have fired by rough count close to one hundred rounds in the 110CL. Some years I have fired more rounds in it, and fewer others.

The Ruger 77 is the only rifle I ever sent back to the factory. When it was new it would scratch cases. There had to be a bur in it. The factory returned with a note they could not find a problem. But it no longer scratched cases.

The identified Savage and Remington actions are quieter then the M77 Ruger action. You can quietly slip a round in the Savage or Remington, but there is a mechanical sound produced by the Ruger. If I can hear it a critter will hear it.

The opinions are based on long term use of the above actions and most likely do not reflect on current production by any of the named manufactures.

In the past I have owned a Husqvarna, which was built on a commercial Model 98 action. It had a slick action that held near maximum 30-06 loads and fired them with accuracy. It was on the heavy side, and the wood was not the greatest. But it is a fine hunting rifle. In my father-in-laws hands it took moose, and caribou in Alaska, and deer in the lower 48. If I had the rifle back it would be re-chamber it to 300 Winchester Magnum.

The Husqvarna M98 action is a favorite of my “Wildcatter” brother and he has built two rifles on Husqvarna improved M98 action. I believe the improvement was in the safety, which allowed for scope mounting.

I have had some experience with the Swede M96 action in a customized rifle. Meaning the barrel was cut to twenty-three inches and it has an after market stock on it. The action is very smooth and dependable. And the rifle is accurate. I would not load the M96 action to higher pressures, because it is not recommended. The model 96 Swede has been bang flop on deer. And the positive feed of the action does not have the mechanical sound of the Ruger 77 action. Nor do I recall the Husqvarna M98 action having that same sound.
 

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Savage uses a heavy 2 lug bolt. There are two holes drilled in the receiver to bleed off excess gas and in the past savage had a safari rifle chambered in 375H&H (and, I think 458 win mag). Never heard of a Savage action breaking or being damaged. Also all the Savages I have owned had very smooth actions.
 

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SDS-GEN said:
Savage uses a heavy 2 lug bolt. There are two holes drilled in the receiver to bleed off excess gas and in the past savage had a safari rifle chambered in 375H&H (and, I think 458 win mag). Never heard of a Savage action breaking or being damaged. Also all the Savages I have owned had very smooth actions.
The 2007 Savage brochure still shows the .375 H&H, as well as the .338 Win. mag., offered in the 116 Weather Warrior series rifle. :)
 

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Never had an ejection problem with mine, I own 3. I did have a problem with a couple of boxes of Win failsafes in 300 win mag. I believe there was a pressure problem with the ammo. I couldn't get the bolt open after firing. This occurred a couple of times and I dumped the rest of the ammo. This is the only feed/eject problem I have ever had. Not saying it doesn't happen, under field conditions, especially, Murphy (of Murphy's Law fame) lurks everywhere. Dirt, ice, adrenaline, and other factors sometimes cause firearms malfunctions (and short stroked bolts). On a recent hunt to Alaska one in our party couldn't get a second shot off at a bear because he short stroked the bolt. He pulled the bolt back as far as it would go on his Sako, shoved it back forward and pulled the trigger only to hear it go click. After a week in the salt water it developed a bit of rust in the action that prevented it from being opened all the way. Happily the first shot was enough and the bear was recovered 20 yards into the bush. I've also heard of accuracy problems and barrels that were drilled off center. Again, not saying it doesn't happen, I'm just kind of skeptical until I see it with my own eyes.
 
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