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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well it's been a while since I've been on this sight and I've missed it.

Question...I leaving for a gun hunt in Missouri late next week (it can't get here quick enough) and I'm going to be taking a rifle that was last shot 2 years ago. I loaded up some round in November of '04 and it was sighted in for these loads and was grouping like a champ. Fast forward a couple of years and I have the same rounds and gun but haven't shot it in over two years...should it still be zeroed if I haven't done anything to it. You'd have to really bump/drop it to change the zero wouldn't you? Just cleaning and storing wouldn't change anything correct?

Just wondering.

Thanks,

Josh
 

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To tell you the truth I think you will be fine. The land owner that we deer hunt shot his Winchester Pre 64 in 300win this year at two coyotes with his handloads that he has not shot in three years. Both coyotes was chasing a two point mule deer at 265yds. away. He hasn't shot that gun sense his father past away. He hit a large male high behind the shoulder shot. Then the female was on dead run when he let the 180gr. fly. Hit her mid behind the shoulder.
 

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Oliverstacey:

Not re-zeroing that gun may cause you reason for deep, deep regret. Get to Missouri, and then find a range there where you can zero it. My experience is that guns cannot be relied to hold a zero over time.
 

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I have rifles that I haven't shot in a while and the scope just seem to drift off zero. I think it would be wise to check it out before you use it to hunt with.
 

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Your stock could have moved, grimlins could have been at work. Nothing like the peace of mind that comes from KNOWING that everything is kewl!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'm making time Saturday morning to go to the range...taking all guns and ammo to fire each one to see if any have moved. Just can't take a chance. I haven't had problems in the past, but I don't need to make it a first on this hunt.

Josh
 

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I have the chanch and I use it often to be able to shoot every day, over the years I have seen vary little change in a rifles performance using the same ammo, with that said I would not trust taking a rifle on a trip with out re-checking AFTER I got there, remember YOU could have changed more than the rifle, added weight, lost weight, just hold the rifle a little different than you did the last time you fired it, HTH JIM
 

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A friend of mine has a Model 700 Remington with a wood stock in .270 Win. I think it has maintained its original zero since new, at least during deer seasons. I say at least during deer seasons because at some other time of year when the humidity is different the wood stock may swell from moisture causing different forend pressure on the barrel and a different point of impact. I had a Model 700 Remington with a wood stock in .17 Rem. The rifle would keep a good zero all winter when the humidity was low. However, by late spring when the humidity increased the point of impact would go up by one inch at 100 yards. I would then readjust the scope. By the middle of the fall season humidity had decreased and the point of impact at 100 yards would go down by one inch. Again I would readjust the scope. This seasonal change in point of impact kept up for the dozen years or so I owned the rifle. My bolt-action rifles with fiberglass stocks all have free-floated barrels and seem to keep their sight settings. My single shot rifles have wood stocks but the wood is free floated from the barrels and they rarely change point of impact. However, I notice that the gap between the barrel and forend (for some forends) seems to change. If they were not free-floated, I think the point of impact would change. I am very careful with my guns. They almost never get bumped and in a vehicle are placed in cloth cases in a special gun rack between the front seats.
 

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I have a 3006 custom springfield with Leopold scope. Had it for many years and my grandfather before me. It has never changed zero, even after being in a scabbard on a horse and jostled around in the truck.
That being said I still re zero every year, it is always just one shot, but makes me feel better.
If I should miss a shot I will know that it is me, not the gun, and continue to hunt.
At this rate a box of shells will last me 10 years, I hope.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
It seemed to hold zero very well and I just got back from Missouri, I had a very good hunt and took my best buck to date. I was on a gas pipeline in a monster box blind and could shoot as far as I wanted to the east (sky was the limit) and 400 yards to the west. On the third day of the hunt Monday the 12th in miserable weather I spotted a nice buck walking fast across the 114 yard length of the cross section. He was halfway across when I spotted him and didn't have much time...had ranged everything earlier in the day and figured he was around 40-50 yards past the nearest pipeline markers with put him around 290-300 yards. First shot didn't seem to affect him, second slowed him down and the third I think missed him. He then walked towards me and stopped around 260 yards slightly quartering to me and I put the forth shot at the base of the neck and it exited low behind the opposite front leg. He took to more steps and fell over. I had a friend with me that said the first three shots took no more than 5 seconds (I guess I was in the zone). I hit him three times once badly in the back leg but two were where they needed to be.

Seventh time to Missouri and in '07 so I guess I was just lucky.


First photo that was taken...



This photo I was told shows off the mass...


This is my favorite...


He had just under 6" bases, they were just amazing...he was just over 19.5" wide outside and 17.5" inside. The crowns were almost 8" at the base of the antler. I'm turly blessed with this one.

Josh
 
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